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I need to create an array of another class. Example:

namespace std
{
      public class Car
      {
           double number,id;

           public Car()
           {
               // initializing my variables for example:
               number = Random.nextdouble();
           }

      }
      public class Factory
      {
           public Factory(int num)
           {
               Car[] arr = new Car(num);
           }
      }
}

The problem is I get this error:

'Car' does not contain a constructor that takes '1' arguments

I just need to have an array of Car in Factory class (the car variables are initialized with its constructor).

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1  
What are you trying to do with new car(num)? what is num supposed to do? Your constructor for car takes no parameters –  Adam Plocher Mar 1 '13 at 18:52
    
@AdamPlocher: Yes, but look at the question title and the variable he's trying to assign it to - it's pretty clear he's trying to create an array. –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '13 at 18:55
    
Yeah, I realized that shortly after commenting :-) –  Adam Plocher Mar 1 '13 at 18:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You've just used the wrong brackets. You always use square brackets for arrays and indexers. Round brackets are to invoke methods, constructors etc. You meant:

car[] arr = new car[num];

Note that conventionally .NET types are Pascal-cased, so your types should be Car and Factory rather than car and factory.

Also note that after creating the array, each element will be a null reference - so you shouldn't write:

// Bad code - will go bang!
Car[] cars = new Car[10];
cars[0].SomeMethod(0);

Instead:

// This will work:
Car[] cars = new Car[10];
cars[0] = new Car(); // Populate the first element with a reference to a Car object
cars[0].SomeMethod();
share|improve this answer
    
thanks,problem solved. but another question: can i declare the arr outside the constructor without the num value? in other words make a array dynamic in size? –  user1229351 Mar 1 '13 at 19:16

You need to use [] not () when you declaring an array or indexers.

car[] arr = new car[num];
share|improve this answer

If your requirements doesn't constrain to use only Array, you can use a typed list.

List<Car> = new List<Car>(num); 
//num has to be the size of list, but a list size is dinamically increased.

The error in your code is that array should be initialized as follows:

public class factory
      {
           public factory(int num)
           {
           car[] arr = new car[num];
           }
      }

Regards,

share|improve this answer
using System;
namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    public class Car
    {
        public double number { get; set; }
        public Car()
        {
            Random r = new Random();            
            number = r.NextDouble();// NextDouble isn't static and requires an instance
        }
    }
    public class Factory
    {
        //declare Car[] outside of the constructor
        public Car[] arr;
        public Factory(int num)
        {
            arr = new Car[num]; 
        }
    }
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Factory f = new Factory(3);
            f.arr[0] = new Car();
            f.arr[1] = new Car();
            f.arr[2] = new Car();
            foreach (Car c in f.arr)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(c.number);
            }
            Console.Read();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Except that ignores num, of course... –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '13 at 18:56
    
@JonSkeet Now is it fine? –  kashif Mar 1 '13 at 19:00
    
@JonSkeet - In the author's own example he ignores both iD and the num since the parameter isn't actually used. –  Ramhound Mar 1 '13 at 19:01
    
@Ramhound: But he's clearly trying to use num in the factory constructor in the question, and previously this answer ignored it. –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '13 at 19:02
    
@kashif: Yes, it's better. It's not really clear why you've introduced the local variables (and it will go bang if num is 0, 1 or 2) but I'm fine with it. –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '13 at 19:03

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