Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

So... I have a little piece of code I have been working on for most of the morning. It's just a little project to help me remember syntax and so on. I have obviously missed some kind of massive error as the code returns a segmentation fault for reasons I don't understand.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <getopt.h>

struct cards 
{
int card_value[99];
char card_name[99];
char card_suit[99];
int card_tally;
};

struct cards hand[2];

void tally (int a)
{
int k, j;
for (k=0; k<5; k++)
 {
  j = j + hand[a].card_value[k];
 }
hand[a].card_tally = j;
 }

 void check_for_ace (int a)
 {
int d;
for (d=0; d>5; d++)
  { 
    if (hand[a].card_name[d] =='A')
      {
          int y;
          int z = 10;
          for (y=0; y<5; y++)
            z = z + hand[a].card_value[y];
          if (z < 22)
            hand[a].card_value[d]=10;
          else
            hand[a].card_value[d]=1;
      }

   }
}

void draw_card (int a)
{
int z = 1 + rand () % 13;
int x=0;

while (hand[a].card_value[x] !=  0)
    { x++; }

if ((z > 1) && (z < 10))
  {
      hand[a].card_value[x]=z;
      hand[a].card_name[x]=((char) '0' + z);
  }
else if (z == 10)
  {
      hand[a].card_value[x]=z;
      hand[a].card_name[x]='T';
  }
else if (z == 11)
  {
      hand[a].card_value[x]=10;
      hand[a].card_name[x]='J';
  }   
else if (z == 12)
  {
      hand[a].card_value[x]=10;
      hand[a].card_name[x]='Q';
  }
else if (z == 13)
  {
      hand[a].card_value[x]=10;
      hand[a].card_name[x]='K';
  }
else if (z == 1)
  {
      /*Function 'check_for_ace' deals with this more properly*/
      hand[a].card_value[x]=1;
      hand[a].card_name[x]='A';
  }
 check_for_ace(a);
 tally(a);
}



void display_hands ()
{
int x;
printf("\nDealer's Hand Shows: ");
for (x=0; hand[0].card_name[x]!=0; x++)
  {
      printf("%c ", hand[0].card_name[x]);
  }

printf("\nPlayer's Hand Shows: ");
for (x=0; hand[1].card_name[x]!=0; x++)
  {
      printf("%c ", hand[1].card_name[x]);
  }
}

void dealer_turn()
{
  while (hand[0].card_tally < 17)
  draw_card(0);
}

void player_turn()
{
int op=0;
while (op != 2)
  {
    printf("What would you like to do?\n");
    printf("(1)it or (2)tand\n");
    scanf("%d", &op); 
    if (op == 1)
     draw_card(1);

  }
}   

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
srand(time(NULL));


    draw_card(0);
    draw_card(1);
    draw_card(1);
    display_hands();
    player_turn();

    dealer_turn();
    display_hands();

return 0;
}

Now, the really odd thing is, see that empty line between player_turn and dealer_turn? If I put a display_hands in there the code executes without error.

Any ideas?

Also, I realize I did use headers I don't require. I plan to use them later and just left them in for this post so that I would have left everything exactly as it is with the error.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by jman, Mike, SztupY, towi, MainMa Mar 1 '13 at 22:21

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Read the compiler warnings! –  user1944441 Mar 1 '13 at 19:46
1  
Did you mean to include <stdio.h> twice? Shouldn't one be <stdlib.h>? –  Inisheer Mar 1 '13 at 19:48
    
Armin: All I get is an implicit function declaration warning about rand but rand will return numbers in a loop until I get sick of seeing them without causing an error. Is there an error I'm missing? –  cwm Mar 1 '13 at 19:49
    
Perhaps this: for (d=0; d>5; d++), in check_for_ace()? Actually, though, that shouldn't fault, it will just never run the loop body... –  twalberg Mar 1 '13 at 19:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You aren't initializing j before you execute this line.

  j = j + hand[a].card_value[k];

When I added a j=0 initialization to your code, it no longer crashes.

E.g.

void tally (int a)
{
int k, j;
j=0;  /* <----- added this line */
for (k=0; k<5; k++)
 {
  j = j + hand[a].card_value[k];
 }
hand[a].card_tally = j;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
You are absolutely correct, that does in fact fix it. I thought that all declared but uninitialized integers started with a value of 0, for some reason. A mistake I will not be making again. Thank you, I really appreciate it. –  cwm Mar 1 '13 at 19:55
    
Please accept answer then if it fixed it. –  dcp Mar 1 '13 at 19:56
    
Only the global-scope ones, but it's best not to rely on that either... –  twalberg Mar 1 '13 at 19:56
    
a simple habit that can save hours of debugging... –  Mike Mar 1 '13 at 19:58

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.