Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am seeing some odd behavior out of the strncat function in the string.h standard library, and would like some help understanding what is going on.


The crux of my issue is in a function I created called readLine with the purpose of returning the lines of a file as char * strings without a trailing newline terminator. That function looks like this:

char * readLine(FILE * fp) {
    char * chunk = NULL;
    char * line = NULL;
    int count = 0;

    // iterate through chunks of a line until we reach the end (or an error)
    while (fgets((chunk = malloc(sizeof(char) * BUFFER_SIZE)), BUFFER_SIZE, fp) != NULL) {

        // realloc on a null pointer works like malloc  
        line = realloc(line, ++count * BUFFER_SIZE * sizeof(char));    

        printf("chunk's contents: %s\n", chunk);

        // does chunk contain the end of a line?
        if(strchr(chunk, '\n') == NULL) {   
            // concatenate string parts and continue loop
            strncat(line, chunk, strlen(chunk) + 1);        
            free(chunk);

        } else {
            // we want to return a \0 terminated string without the \n
            // expected position of \n in chunk is ({length of chunk}-1)
            chunk[(strlen(chunk) - 1)] = '\0';

            // concatenate string parts
            strncat(line, chunk, strlen(chunk) + 1);
            printf("readLine line:    %s\n", line);
            free(chunk);

            break;        
        }        
    }
    return line;
}

I call it in main in a loop that looks like this:

FILE * fp = NULL;

if ((fp = fopen(FILE_PATH, "r")) != NULL) {
    char * line = NULL;

    while ((line = readLine(fp)) != NULL) {
        printf("main line:        %s\n\n", line);
        free(line);
    }

    fclose(fp);
}

Now the odd behavior comes in my definition of #define BUFFER_SIZE 1000. With it set like that I get the following output (which is not what I want):

chunk's contents: I am on line 1
readLine line:    I am on line 1
main line:        I am on line 1

chunk's contents: Over here I am on line 2
readLine line:    I am on line 1Over here I am on line 2
main line:        I am on line 1Over here I am on line 2

chunk's contents: Line 3 here
readLine line:    I am on line 1Over here I am on line 2Line 3 here
main line:        I am on line 1Over here I am on line 2Line 3 here

chunk's contents: Look out for 4
readLine line:    I am on line 1Over here I am on line 2Line 3 hereLook out for 4
main line:        I am on line 1Over here I am on line 2Line 3 hereLook out for 4

chunk's contents: Johnny 5 alive!
readLine line:    I am on line 1Over here I am on line 2Line 3 hereLook out for 4Johnny 5 alive!
main line:        I am on line 1Over here I am on line 2Line 3 hereLook out for 4Johnny 5 alive!

BUT if i change that definition to something like #define BUFFER_SIZE 20, I get the output I am looking for:

chunk's contents: I am on line 1

readLine line:    I am on line 1
main line:        I am on line 1

chunk's contents: Over here I am on l
chunk's contents: ine 2

readLine line:    Over here I am on line 2
main line:        Over here I am on line 2

chunk's contents: Line 3 here

readLine line:    Line 3 here
main line:        Line 3 here

chunk's contents: Look out for 4

readLine line:    Look out for 4
main line:        Look out for 4

chunk's contents: Johnny 5 alive!

readLine line:    Johnny 5 alive!
main line:        Johnny 5 alive!

I think I have the problem narrowed down to the strncat(line, chunk, strlen(chunk) + 1); line. I don't understand why the preceding lines are being included when my BUFFER_SIZE is sufficiently high.

share|improve this question
    
Try to memset your buffers to 0 before using them. –  bash.d Mar 1 '13 at 20:28
    
Note that your strncat is implementing Schlemiel the Painter's Algorithm: joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000319.html –  ecatmur Mar 1 '13 at 20:34
1  
Notice that with line = realloc(line, ... you will have an unrecoverable memory leak should realloc fail and return NULL (which you should check for). The realloc function is horrible from an API point of view, among other reasons because it invites to write incorrect code like this. –  hlovdal Mar 2 '13 at 0:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
line = realloc(line, ++count * BUFFER_SIZE * sizeof(char));

does not initialise the allocated memory. So if the first realloc in readLine gives you back the chunk of memory you got in the previous invocation - not impossible, you may have the old contents still in there.

Anyway, with uninitialised memory, the first strncat may invoke undefined behaviour, since there need not be a 0 byte in the allocated memory.

Allocate a buffer to line before entering the loop, and write a 0 to the first byte.

Also, don't use

line = realloc(line, ++count * BUFFER_SIZE * sizeof(char));

If realloc fails, you leak memory. And you should check the return value of realloc,

char *temp = realloc(line, ++count * BUFFER_SIZE * sizeof(char));
if (temp == NULL) {
  // Oops
} else {
    line = temp;
}

And don't malloc to chunk in the fgets call,

while (fgets((chunk = malloc(sizeof(char) * BUFFER_SIZE)), BUFFER_SIZE, fp) != NULL)

If malloc fails, that invokes undefined behaviour too. malloc and check before calling fgets,

while ((chunk = malloc(sizeof(char) * BUFFER_SIZE)) && fgets(chunk, BUFFER_SIZE, fp) != NULL)
share|improve this answer
    
great answer, Thank You. In the realloc idiom, would it be appropriate to free(line) if temp == NULL? I really like that while condition revision too –  Hari Seldon Mar 1 '13 at 20:49
    
Yes, then line still points to allocated memory that shall be freed. What sort of diagnostic and recovery/cleanup before exit you do when realloc fails depends. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 1 '13 at 20:53

You can stick with realloc and memset your buffers to zero before, though.

share|improve this answer

Your problem is here:

    line = realloc(line, ++count * BUFFER_SIZE * sizeof(char));    

According to the man page for realloc:

"realloc(3) does not guarantee that the additional memory is also
 zero-filled."

and

"If ptr is NULL, realloc() is identical to a call to malloc() for size bytes."

So any new memory you get is likely to be filled with non-zero bytes, meaning the first time it is called, it's probably not going to have a 0 for the first byte, which means that strncat is going to be appending to whatever junk bytes are in the allocation.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.