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FormatterServices.GetSerializableMembers returns protected and internal fields twice for derived types. Once as an instance of SerializationFieldInfo and once as RtFieldInfo.

I find this very confusing! Can anyone help me understand why Microsoft decided to implement it this way?

I have written a sample program that re-produce my problem:

class Program
{
    [Serializable]
    public class BaseA
    {
        private int privateField;
    }

    [Serializable]
    public class DerivedA : BaseA { }

    [Serializable]
    public class BaseB
    {
        protected int protectedField;
    }

    [Serializable]
    public class DerivedB : BaseB { }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Program.PrintMemberInfo(typeof(DerivedA));
        Program.PrintMemberInfo(typeof(DerivedB));
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    static void PrintMemberInfo(Type t)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(t.Name);

        foreach (var mbr in FormatterServices.GetSerializableMembers(t))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("  {0} ({1})", mbr.Name, mbr.MetadataToken);
        }

        Console.WriteLine();
    }
}

I would expect that privateField and protectedField are reported once each. However this is the actual output when running the program:

DerivedA
  BaseA+privateField (67108865)

DerivedB
  protectedField (67108866)
  BaseB+protectedField (67108866)

As you can see protectedField appear twice, with different names but with the same metadata token so it is indeed the very same field.

Can anyone explain why?

share|improve this question
    
Apparently, this has been known for a while: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2bb1dc1s(v=vs.90).aspx (comment section). –  500 - Internal Server Error Mar 1 '13 at 23:30
    
But still no explanation in sight... :-( –  Mårten Wikström Mar 2 '13 at 14:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This seems not to be related so much to the FormatterServices, but to how reflection works and how it is used by FormatterServices. For the Type.GetFields method when used with BindingFlags.NonPublic (see: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6ztex2dc.aspx): "Only protected and internal fields on base classes are returned; private fields on base classes are not returned."

Completely stripped of any checks, and tailored to your example, what FormatterServices does to get the fields is basically:

    static IEnumerable<FieldInfo> GetSerializableFields(Type type, Func<Type, IEnumerable<FieldInfo>> andNext)
    {
        return 
            (type.IsInterface || type == typeof(object))
            ? new FieldInfo[0]
            : type.GetFields(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
                  .Where(f => (f.Attributes & FieldAttributes.NotSerialized) != FieldAttributes.NotSerialized)
                  .Concat(andNext(type));
    }

    static void PrintMemberInfo(Type t)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(t.Name);

        Func<Type, IEnumerable<FieldInfo>> andNext = null;
        andNext = tp => GetSerializableFields(tp.BaseType, andNext);
        var fields = GetSerializableFields(t, tp => new FieldInfo[0]).ToArray();
        var base_fields = GetSerializableFields(t.BaseType, andNext).ToArray();

        var counter = 0;
        foreach (var f in fields.Concat(base_fields))
        {
            Console.WriteLine(
                "{0} Reflected: {1} - Declaring: {2} - Field: {3} ({4})", 
                (counter++) + 1, f.ReflectedType.Name, f.DeclaringType.Name, f.Name, f.MetadataToken);
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
    }
}

Which generates the following output for your example classes:

DerivedA
1 Reflected: BaseA - Declaring: BaseA - Field: privateField (67108865)

DerivedB
1 Reflected: DerivedB - Declaring: BaseB - Field: protectedField (67108866)
2 Reflected: BaseB - Declaring: BaseB - Field: protectedField (67108866)

And FormatterServices simply does not filter its results by checking if it includes the same field from the same declaring type more than once. Given the way FormatterServices is implemented (performing checks on a type's serializable base types), they should probably be doing something like filter by ReflectedType == DeclaringType:

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it's just like they forgot to do that filtering. Thank you for your research effort. –  Mårten Wikström Jul 14 '13 at 12:29

After testing it from few angles, I decided to change my answer.

The method GetSerializableMembers() is defected, The duplicates are not a correct projection of the underlying memory. (which is really surprising..)

I suggest using: t.GetType().GetMembers(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);

And check the incomming result for the list of members.

Good Luck.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for answering. However, you write "...get all the derived object members that are marked [Serializable] regardless of their access modifier." - The way I interpret that actually speaks against what the method returns where the same field is returned more than once. I cannot think of a single use case where duplicates are interesting or non-confusing. I would mark your answer as accepted if you can provide such an example. –  Mårten Wikström Apr 6 '13 at 15:56
    
Fair enough, I added such an example. but the example or case usage is not really the issue at hand - the question is: would you rather prefer the method to return results which are suitable to how we as developers or humans visualize the object or how it is physically stored in memory? –  G.Y Apr 7 '13 at 8:20
    
I think you are missing the point in my question. The fields I regard as duplicates are really referring to the same member since they have identical metadata tokens. In the example you posted you have two separate fields (different metadata tokens) so there are no duplicates there! –  Mårten Wikström Apr 7 '13 at 21:18
    
yes - I see your point of view. I believe (not tested it yet) that when you declare a protected field and afterward derive the class, the compiler create a new member and set a reference to the field in the base class. if this is not the case, the method have a bug, but I think this is what happening. –  G.Y Apr 9 '13 at 9:15
    
That is not correct. The compiler will not create new members for inherited members unless they are overridden. –  Mårten Wikström Apr 9 '13 at 16:43

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