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I've noticed that lately my assignment grades have been getting lower as the class has advanced in Python, and I was wondering if anyone could help me see what I did wrong with these code snippets and why they were supposedly wrong. This may be a long post, but any help that'll stop me from making these mistakes in the future is appreciated.

def geometric(l):
    'list(int) ==> bool, returns True if the integers form a geometric sequence'
    res = False
    if (l[1] / l[0]) == (l[2] / l[1]):
        res = True
    return res

This is a code that was considered wrong. As the code says, it takes a list of ints and returns whether or not they're in a geometric sequence. My book says a sequence is geometric if a1/a0 equals a2/a1, which worked just fine for 2, 4, 8, 16, etc. I just realized that the issue with this one is that it only checks the first two indices and ignores the rest of the numbers. What could I write that would fix this?

def letter2number(grade):
    '''string ==> int, returns the numeric equivalent to the letter grade, adding 0.3 if the grade contains a +
    and subtracts 0.3 if the grade contains a -'''
    res = 0
    if 'F' in grade:
        res = 0
    elif 'D' in grade:
        res = 1
    elif 'C' in grade:
        res = 2
    elif 'B' in grade:
        res = 3
    elif 'A' in grade:
        res = 4
    if '+' in grade:
        res += 0.3
    elif '-' in grade:
        res -= 0.3
    return res

This wasn't considered wrong, exactly, but it was much longer than he intended I guess. A comment he wrote on the file was "# set res to index of grade in grades," but since it was an independent lab I couldn't ask for help. I attempted to give each grade its value in a list but I couldn't index it correctly.

def leap(n):
    'int ==> bool, returns True if the year is a leap year, False otherwise'
    res = False
    if n % 4 == 0 and n % 400 == 0 or not n % 100 == 0:
        res = True
    return res

Figuring out an if statement that translated into "A year is a leap year if it is divisible by 4 but not by 100, unless it is divisible by 400" was confusing for me. Apparently what I wrote works for all odd numbers, but I can't really figure out why.

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closed as off topic by abarnert, Robᵩ, George Stocker Mar 1 '13 at 21:43

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
n % 4 == 0 and n % 400 == 0 or not n % 100 == 0 parses as (n % 4 == 0 and n % 400 == 0) or not n % 100 == 0 not as n % 4 == 0 and (n % 400 == 0 or not n % 100 == 0) which would be correct. In other words, and has a higher precedence than or. –  Steven Rumbalski Mar 1 '13 at 21:32
    
Now that I think about it, I think this probably belongs on codereview.stackexchange.com, not here. –  abarnert Mar 1 '13 at 21:37
    
Actually, this certainly doesn't belong on Code Review. As per the faq, questions about trouble-shooting, debugging or understanding code snippets are strictly off topic there. –  codesparkle Mar 2 '13 at 20:55

2 Answers 2

It seems like at least half your problems aren't programming problems, but problems understanding the assignment. For example:

This is a code that was considered wrong. As the code says, it takes a list of ints and returns whether or not they're in a geometric sequence. My book says a sequence is geometric if a1/a0 equals a2/a1, which worked just fine for 2, 4, 8, 16, etc. I just realized that the issue with this one is that it only checks the first two indices and ignores the rest of the numbers.

Your code correctly implements what you thought the assignment was. It just doesn't implement what the assignment actually was, by checking all pairs of indices. Once you know that's what you need to do, presumably you can figure out how to write a loop that compares pairs of indices:

def geometric(l):
    'list(int) ==> bool, returns True if the integers form a geometric sequence'
    res = True
    for i in range(len(l) - 2):
        if (l[i+1] / l[i]) != (l[i+2] / l[i+1]):
            res = False
    return res

And then you might notice that you can short-circuit things at the first failure, or compare all the ratios to the first instead of comparing them as pairs (meaning you have to calculate most of them twice), or write a simple helper function that just checks one pair and use all to run it on all of them, etc., but those are all just refinements.

Then:

Figuring out an if statement that translated into "A year is a leap year if it is divisible by 4 but not by 100, unless it is divisible by 400" was confusing for me. Apparently what I wrote works for all odd numbers, but I can't really figure out why.

You first need to translate that into a sequence of and and or and not steps in English. What you did, "divisible by 4 and divisible by 400 or not divisible by 100", is not even close to the same thing. You then coded that incorrect algorithm correctly, but that's no help.

All you need to do is translate "but not" to "and not", and "unless" to "or": "visible by 4, and either not divisible by 100 or divisible by 400". The only tricky part about translating that to code is using parentheses instead of the command and "either":

if n % 4 == 0 and (not n % 100 == 0 or n % 400 == 0):
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Perhaps the default case should be False because sequences with a length less than 3 will return True. Of course, I don't know what the right return value would be. Perhaps an exception. –  Steven Rumbalski Mar 1 '13 at 21:26
    
@StevenRumbalski: Compare to, e.g., all([]). Generally, when something is defined as "true if every …" and there are no "…", you consider it vacuously true. (However, if the OP raised that issue and asked the prof what to do in that case, it certainly wouldn't have hurt his grade…) –  abarnert Mar 1 '13 at 21:33
    
Is the talk about the second question coming along soon? –  Volatility Mar 1 '13 at 21:37

For your letter2number I would have used a dictionary instead to handle the mapping, something like this:

def letter2number(grade):
    G = {'F': 0, 'D': 1, 'C': 2, 'B': 3, 'A': 4}
    D = {'+': 0.3, '-': -0.3}

    if len(grade) == 2:
        return G[grade[0]] + D[grade[1]]
    else:
        return G[grade[0]]
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