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Given the following code, is it possible to define scheduler, creation, and continuation settings for instances of Task doThing?

I want to be able to schedule the multiple instances of doThing so they actually run exclusively from other instances (even when they are awaiting other subtasks).

    private static async Task doThing(object i)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("in do thing {0}", (int)i);
        await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
        Console.WriteLine("out of do thing {0}", (int)i);
    }
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        CancellationTokenSource source = new CancellationTokenSource();
        ConcurrentExclusiveSchedulerPair pair = new ConcurrentExclusiveSchedulerPair(TaskScheduler.Current);

        Task Task1 = Task.Factory.StartNew((Func<object,Task>)doThing, 1, source.Token, TaskCreationOptions.AttachedToParent, pair.ExclusiveScheduler).Unwrap();
        Task Task2 = Task.Factory.StartNew((Func<object, Task>)doThing, 2, source.Token, TaskCreationOptions.AttachedToParent, pair.ExclusiveScheduler);
        Task Task3 = doThing(3);
        Task Task4 = Task.Factory.StartNew(async (i) =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("in do thing {0}", (int)i);
            await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
            Console.WriteLine("out of do thing {0}", (int)i);
        }, 4, source.Token, TaskCreationOptions.None, pair.ExclusiveScheduler);
        Task.WaitAll(Task1, Task2, Task3, Task4);
        Console.ReadKey();
        return;
    }
share|improve this question
    
Do you mean that Task2 should start only after Task1 completes? –  svick Mar 1 '13 at 22:01
    
Yes. I'm aware of .ContinueWith but I don't care about the order in which they execute, as long as they don't execute concurrently. –  Jake Mar 1 '13 at 22:19
    
What is the significance of your "non-lambda" tasks? In your example above, while you don't use a lambda, you are using delegates in your tasks, and that's the only thing that matters. Lambdas are just syntax sugar. –  Andrew Arnott Mar 3 '13 at 17:15
    
@AndrewArnott You're right. I'm having a hard time consisely defining tasks created wrapped in another task by StartNew due to calling await within. –  Jake Mar 5 '13 at 17:55
1  
I've renamed your question to better match content. –  Andrew Arnott Mar 5 '13 at 22:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

TPL TaskSchedulers only can see one synchronous segment of an async method at a time, so you can't do it simply with schedulers. But you can do it, using a higher level primitive. One that I frequently use is TPL Dataflow.

First, install the NuGet package:

Install-Package Microsoft.Tpl.Dataflow

Then use this code:

private static async Task doThing(object i) {
    Console.WriteLine("in do thing {0}", (int)i);
    await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
    Console.WriteLine("out of do thing {0}", (int)i);
}

static void Main(string[] args) {
    CancellationTokenSource source = new CancellationTokenSource();
    var exclusivityBlock = new ActionBlock<Func<Task>>(f => f(), new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions { CancellationToken = source.Token }};
    exclusivityBlock.Post(() => doThing(1));
    exclusivityBlock.Post(() => doThing(2));
    exclusivityBlock.Post(() => doThing(3));
    exclusivityBlock.Post(
        async () => {
            Console.WriteLine("in do thing {0}", 4);
            await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
            Console.WriteLine("out of do thing {0}", 4);
        });
    exclusivityBlock.Complete();
    exclusivityBlock.Completion.Wait();
    Console.WriteLine("Done");
    Console.ReadKey();
    return;
}

This code lacks an individual Task for each posted work item. If that's important, you can use this sample:

internal static class Program {
    private static async Task doThing(object i) {
        Console.WriteLine("in do thing {0}", (int)i);
        await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
        Console.WriteLine("out of do thing {0}", (int)i);
    }

    private static void Main(string[] args) {
        CancellationTokenSource source = new CancellationTokenSource();
        var exclusivityBlock = CreateTrackingBlock<Func<Task>>(
            f => f(), new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions { CancellationToken = source.Token });
        var task1 = exclusivityBlock.PostWithCompletion(() => doThing(1));
        var task2 = exclusivityBlock.PostWithCompletion(() => doThing(2));
        var task3 = exclusivityBlock.PostWithCompletion(() => doThing(3));
        var task4 = exclusivityBlock.PostWithCompletion(
            async () => {
                Console.WriteLine("in do thing {0}", 4);
                await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
                Console.WriteLine("out of do thing {0}", 4);
            });

        Task.WaitAll(task1, task2, task3, task4);
        Console.WriteLine("Done");
        Console.ReadKey();
        return;
    }

    private static ActionBlock<Tuple<T, TaskCompletionSource<object>>> CreateTrackingBlock<T>(Func<T, Task> action, ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions options = null) {
        return new ActionBlock<Tuple<T, TaskCompletionSource<object>>>(
            async tuple => {
                try {
                    await action(tuple.Item1);
                    tuple.Item2.TrySetResult(null);
                } catch (Exception ex) {
                    tuple.Item2.TrySetException(ex);
                }
            },
            options ?? new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions());
    }

    internal static Task PostWithCompletion<T>(this ActionBlock<Tuple<T, TaskCompletionSource<object>>> block, T value) {
        var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
        var tuple = Tuple.Create(value, tcs);
        block.Post(tuple);
        return tcs.Task;
    }
}

Note however that this is just a bit more laborious, because Dataflow isn't primarily designed for tracking individual submissions but rather the overall process. So while the above works just fine, Stephen Cleary's answer is probably simpler and therefore preferable.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. I learned a new trick! :) –  Stephen Cleary Mar 3 '13 at 18:27
    
Also, you can use block options to specify a TaskScheduler. Technically, it is a lambda task, but it's still a great technique. –  Stephen Cleary Mar 3 '13 at 22:18
    
Yes, there are lots of goodies in the options. As for 'lambda tasks', as I comment on the question itself, it's irrelevant. method groups and lambda tasks are equivalent for nearly all purposes. –  Andrew Arnott Mar 3 '13 at 22:40
    
Thanks for the help so far. A beefed up example would be very appreciated! –  Jake Mar 5 '13 at 18:35
1  
I've updated my answer, @Jake. –  Andrew Arnott Mar 5 '13 at 23:08

Given the following code, is it possible to define scheduler, creation, and continuation settings for instances of Task doThing?

The bad news is: no, there is no way to do that. It doesn't make sense to define a "scheduler" for a non-lambda task. Creation options aren't needed, and continuation options are set on continuations, not on the task itself.

The good news is: you don't need this behavior.

You want asynchronous synchronization. The built-in way to do this is using SemaphoreSlim, as such:

SemaphoreSlim mutex = new SemaphoreSlim(1);
private static async Task doThingAsync(object i)
{
    await mutex.WaitAsync();
    try
    {
        Console.WriteLine("in do thing {0}", (int)i);
        await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
        Console.WriteLine("out of do thing {0}", (int)i);
    }
    finally
    {
        mutex.Release();
    }
}

Personally, I think the finally syntax is awkward, so I define an IDisposable and use using instead.

If you need more power, Stephen Toub has an async coordination primitives series, and I have a full suite of primitives in my AsyncEx library. Both of these resources include an AsyncLock with a Task<IDisposable> WaitAsync() member so you can use using instead of finally.

share|improve this answer
    
I disagree, there is certainly a way to avoid concurrency between tasks. I'll add an answer of my own. –  Andrew Arnott Mar 3 '13 at 17:12

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