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I would like to do something like this but it won't compile because Pair cannot be assigned to.

var
  MyDictionary: TDictionary<TGuid, TCustomRecord>;
  Pair: TPair<TGuid, TCustomRecord>;
begin
  // ... create and populate my dictionary ...

  foreach Pair in MyDictionary do
  begin
    PairRef.Value.MyField := PairRef.Value.MyField + 1;
  end;
end

Just to be clear, I know how to accomplish this with more code, I'm looking for something that is concise and easy to read.

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you can use TDictionary<T>.Values –  Sir Rufo Mar 1 '13 at 21:59
    
You want to be able to modify either the key or the value in the for loop? You can do a by-item iterator using for CustomRecord in MyDictionary (where CustomRecord : TCustomRecord) if you just want to manipulate the values –  Petesh Mar 1 '13 at 22:00
    
@SirRufo, Values is a read only enumarator –  Lawrence Barsanti Mar 1 '13 at 22:04
    
@Petesh, I want to update my value. Unfortunately, the approach you suggested does not work. –  Lawrence Barsanti Mar 1 '13 at 22:05
4  
@Lawrence: Use TObjectDictionary instead, and pass [doOwnsValues] in the constructor; it makes TObjectDictionary free the Values as they're extracted, deleted, or the dictionary is destroyed (similar to the way TObjectList behaves). Then you can use a class instead of a record, and won't have this issue. –  Ken White Mar 1 '13 at 22:37
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no iterator on TDictionary that returns a reference to a value. All the iterators provide values and that means that what you are asking for is not possible with the current design.

In other languages, for example C++ and D that I know, references are first class citizens in the language. You can easily write iterators that enumerate references rather than values. That's what you need to solve your problem concisely. Unfortunately the language is lacking.

One obvious option would be to switch to using reference types (class) rather than value types (record). That would solve the iteration problem in a stroke because would be iterating over references. However, one usually chooses to use value types for a good reason and you may have constraints that stop you making this switch.

Another possibility would be to write a container that offered iterators that provided pointers to the values. That's as close as you can get to a reference to a record. But you would have to roll your own container.

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Darn, this is not the answer I was hoping for. –  Lawrence Barsanti Mar 1 '13 at 23:45
    
It would be ugly, but I wonder if you could get around this by making a TDictionary of Pointers to Records. (Gross, I know) –  Warren P Mar 2 '13 at 12:47
    
@Warren But who would own the records? You'd have to have a separate container for them. –  David Heffernan Mar 3 '13 at 8:29
1  
Yeah, I guess it's Bad All The Way Down. –  Warren P Mar 4 '13 at 14:14
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Here is a simple program which shows the different handling using records and objects with a TDictionary.

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}
{$R *.res}

uses
  System.SysUtils, System.Generics.Collections;

type
  TMyRecord = record
    Field : Integer;
  end;

  TMyObject = class
    Field : Integer;
  end;

procedure UseObjectDict;
var
  LDict :  TDictionary<TGUID, TMyObject>;
  LValue : TMyObject;
begin
  write( 'TMyObject: ' );

  LDict := TObjectDictionary<TGUID, TMyObject>.Create( [doOwnsValues] );
  try

    // populate
    while LDict.Count < 10 do
    begin
      LDict.Add( TGuid.NewGuid, TMyObject.Create );
    end;

    // update
    for LValue in LDict.Values do
      begin
        LValue.Field := LValue.Field + 1;
      end;

    // output
    for LValue in LDict.Values do
      begin
        write( LValue.Field, ', ' );
      end;
    Writeln;

  finally
    LDict.Free;
  end;
end;

procedure UseRecordDict;
var
  LDict :  TDictionary<TGUID, TMyRecord>;
  LKey :   TGUID;
  LValue : TMyRecord;
begin
  write( 'TMyRecord: ' );
  LDict := TDictionary<TGUID, TMyRecord>.Create;
  try

    // populate
    while LDict.Count < 10 do
      begin
        LValue.Field := 0;
        LDict.Add( TGuid.NewGuid, LValue );
      end;

    // update
    for LKey in LDict.Keys do
      begin
        LValue.Field := LDict[LKey].Field + 1;
        LDict.AddOrSetValue( LKey, LValue );
      end;

    // output
    for LValue in LDict.Values do
      begin
        write( LValue.Field, ', ' );
      end;
    Writeln;

  finally
    LDict.Free;
  end;
end;

begin
  ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown := True;
  try

    UseObjectDict;
    UseRecordDict;

  except
    on E : Exception do
      Writeln( E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message );
  end;

  ReadLn;

end.
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1  
+1 Horrible that we need to jump through such hoops... –  Marjan Venema Mar 2 '13 at 9:26
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