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I had to answer this question with some code:

Suppose I wrote the following method specification:
public void manipulateData ( ) throws java.sql.SQLException, java.sql.SQLDataException

You are writing code for a database program that will use this method and you want to handle each specifically. What should the try/catch clause look like?
You can use no-ops-- empty blocks {}--for the catch clause contents.
We are only interested in the syntax and structure of the statements here.

I answered with this:

try {

} catch(java.sql.SQLException e) {

}
catch(java.sql.SQLDataException e) {

}

He did not accept the answer for this reason:

"Your catch clauses are in the wrong order. Can you explain why the order matters?"

Is he correct in his answer?

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4  
An exception will only be caught once. If the first exception matches the type, the second and so on will be skipped over, even they might be sub types. So normally sub types come first and are followed by super types, so different types of exceptions will be caught precisely. –  shuangwhywhy Mar 1 '13 at 22:48
2  
This is cause an compilation Unreachable code is an error! –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 2 '13 at 12:14
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8 Answers

Yes he is correct. As you can see in the Javadoc, SQLDataException is a subclass of SQLException. Therefore, your answer is wrong, since it would create a block of unreachable code in the second catch.

In Java, this code would not even compile. In other languages (e.g. python) such code would create a subtle bug, because SQLDataException would actually be caught in the first block, and not in the second one (as would be the case if it was not a subclass).

Had you answered catch(java.sql.SQLException | java.sql.SQLDataException e) { }, it would still be incorrect, since the question asks to handle each exception specifically.

The correct answer is in Grijesh's answer

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it's actually more that SQLDataException will not even be available to be caught at that point, this will create a error if I recall correctly –  ratchet freak Mar 2 '13 at 1:01
4  
@ratchetfreak Yes. If fails at compile time with exception java.sql.SQLDataException has already been caught. The compiler is smart enough to detect this. But even if the compiler did not detect it, it would still be a logical error, since the second catch would be unreachable. –  user000001 Mar 2 '13 at 6:52
1  
This can be generalized to other programming languages as well, and in this case the compiler may not be able to produce an error(e.g. in python where it is not possible to do these checkings at compile-time), and in that case you'll simply have a bug. –  Bakuriu Mar 2 '13 at 7:42
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In Java you have to put the least inclusive Exception first. The next exceptions must be more inclusive (when they are related).

For instance: if you put the most inclusive of all (Exception) first, the next ones will never be called. Code like this:

try {
     System.out.println("Trying to prove a point");
     throw new java.sql.SqlDataException("Where will I show up?");
}catch(Exception e){
     System.out.println("First catch");
} catch(java.sql.SQLException e) {
     System.out.println("Second catch");
}
catch(java.sql.SQLDataException e) {
     System.out.println("Third catch");
}

will never print the message you'd expect it to print.

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5  
And the compiler would be mad about it. –  Luiggi Mendoza Mar 1 '13 at 22:30
    
Absolutely. But the real question is: would the instructor be even madder about it? –  DigCamara Mar 1 '13 at 22:34
    
If the instructor has a compiler in his head, it will be :) –  Luiggi Mendoza Mar 1 '13 at 22:35
2  
Well, later exceptions don't always have to be more inclusive; only in the case where some caught exceptions are subclasses of others (as in the example given). –  LarsH Mar 2 '13 at 7:33
1  
@LarsH you're right. I've modified my answer to reflect the missing information –  DigCamara Mar 2 '13 at 18:58
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Think of the inheritance hierarchies of the Exceptions: SQLDataException extends SQLException So if you catch the 'generic' one first (i.e. the topmost base-class of the hierarchy) then every thing 'below' it is of the same type due to polymorphism i.e., SQLDataException isa SQLException

Thus you should capture them in bottom up order w.r.t. the inheritance hierarchy i.e., subclasses first all the way to (generic) base class. This is so because the catch clauses are evaluated in the order you've declared them.

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but how do I explain this part if my answer was wrong? "Can you explain why the order matters?" Is he talking about my code or just talking about in general use? –  user2124033 Mar 1 '13 at 22:41
    
Thanks for the information! Would this be the correct way to change the ansewr? try { } catch(java.sql.SQLException | java.sql.SQLDataException e) { } –  user2124033 Mar 1 '13 at 22:50
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SQLDataException will never be hit as SQLException will catch any SQL exceptions before they reach SQLDataException.

SQLDataException is a sub-class of SQLException

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Order matter when catching exceptions because of following reason:

Remember:

  • A base class variable can also reference child class object.
  • e is a reference variable
catch(ExceptionType e){
}

The lowercase character e is a reference to the thrown (and caught) ExceptionType object.

Reason why your code not accepted?

It is important to remember that exception subclass must come before any their superclasses. This is because a catch statement that uses a superclasses will catch exception of that type plus any of its subclasses. Thus, a subclass would never be reached if it came after its superclass.
Further, in Java, Unreachable code is an error.

SQLException is supperclass of SQLDataException

   +----+----+----+
   | SQLException |  `e` can reference SQLException as well as SQLDataException
   +----+----+----+
          ^
          |
          |
+----+----+----+---+
| SQLDataException |   More specific 
+----+----+----+---+

And if your write like having error Unreachable code (read comments):

try{

} 
catch(java.sql.SQLException e){//also catch exception of SQLDataException type 

}
catch(java.sql.SQLDataException e){//hence this remains Unreachable code

}

If you try to compile this program, you will receive an error message stating that the first catch statement will handle all SQLException-based errors, including SQLDataException. This means that the second catch statement will never execute.

Correct Solution?

To fix it reverse the order of the catch statements.That is following:

try{

} 
catch(java.sql.SQLDataException e){

}catch(java.sql.SQLException e){

}
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Reference: Multiple Catch Clauses –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 2 '13 at 12:21
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For compiler multiple catch statements are like if..else if..else if..

So, from the point where compiler can map the generated exception (directly or by implicit type conversion), it will not execute subsequent catch statements.

To avoid this implicit type conversion you should keep the more generic exception at last. More derived should be stated at the beginning of he catch statements and most generic should go at the last catch statements.

SQLDataException is derived from SQLException which is interns deiced from Exception. So, you will not be able to execute any code written in catch(java.sql.SQLDataException e){} this block. Compiler even flags for that situation that its a dead code and will not be executed.

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When exception happens in the method, a special method exception table is checked, it contains records for each catch block: exception type, start instruction and end instruction. If the order of exception is incorrect, some catch block would be unreachable. Sure javac could sort records in this table for developer, but it does not.

JVM Specification: 1 and 2

The order in which the exception handlers of a method are searched for a match is important. Within a class file, the exception handlers for each method are stored in a table (§4.7.3). At run time, when an exception is thrown, the Java Virtual Machine searches the exception handlers of the current method in the order that they appear in the corresponding exception handler table in the class file, starting from the beginning of that table.

As long as first exception is a parent of the second, the second block becomes unreacheble.

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Java Language Specification §11.2.3 explains this situation:

It is a compile-time error if a catch clause can catch checked exception class E1 and a preceding catch clause of the immediately enclosing try statement can catch E1 or a superclass of E1.

Version in plain english:

More general exceptions must be after specific ones. More general exceptions must be after specific ones.

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