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I'm trying to display a set of playing cards, which have Unicode values in the 1F0A0 to 1F0DF range. Whenever I try to use chars with more than 4 chars in their code, I get errors. Is it possible to use these characters in this context? I'm using Visual Studio 2012.

char AceOfSpades = '\u1F0A0'; immediately upon typing gives me the error "Too many characters in character literal" This still shows up with either of the Unicode or UTF8 encodings. If I try to display '\u1F0A' like above... With Unicode it shows '?' With UTF8 it shows 3 characters.

I tried all the given options for OutputEncoding string AceOfSpades = "\U0001F0A0"; Default, Unicode, ASCII: ?? UTF7: +2DzcoA- UTF8: four wierd characters UTF32 , BigEndianUnicode: IOException Console.OutputEncoding = System.Text.Encoding.UTF32;, despite being an option, crashes even if it's the only line of code. UTF16 was not on the list.

How can I check which version of Unicode I'm using?

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What do you mean by "I get errors"? Do you mean compile-time errors, or it just doesn't display properly? Is this on the command line console? –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '13 at 23:25
    
Also, please provide a simple code sample that manifests the problem you're facing. –  millimoose Mar 1 '13 at 23:31
    
I thought the output was limited from \u0000 to \uFFFF, but I may be mixing things up now. –  John Willemse Mar 1 '13 at 23:39
    
    
You are not going to find a font that can be used for the console window that has these glyphs. –  Hans Passant Mar 2 '13 at 3:28

2 Answers 2

In order to use characters from outside the Basic Multilingual Plane, you need to escape them with \U, not \u. That requires eight hexadecimal digits (which, to be honest, makes little sense, since all Unicode characters can be written with six hexadecimal digits).

However, the type char in .NET can only represent UTF-16 code units, meaning that characters outside the BMP require a pair of chars (a surrogate pair). So you have to make it a string.

string AceOfSpades = "\U0001F0A0";
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Check out the documentation of char: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.char(v=vs.71).aspx "The Char value type represents a Unicode character, also called a Unicode code point, and is implemented as a 16-bit number ranging in value from hexadecimal 0x0000 to 0xFFFF. A single Char cannot represent a Unicode character that is encoded as a surrogate pair. However, a String, which is a collection of Char objects, can represent a Unicode character encoded as a surrogate pair." –  Ed A Jul 16 '13 at 16:03
    
@Ciemnl What do you want me to check there? (FWIW msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.char.aspx is the latest version of the documentation) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 16 '13 at 20:38
    
Oops no sorry I posted that to reinforce your point. –  Ed A Jul 20 '13 at 16:57

I am going to assume (until you edit your post for clarity) that your symbols are not displaying properly. If this is not the case, I will delete this answer.

Set your console's encoding to Unicode or UTF-8.

Console.OutputEncoding = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode

or

Console.OutputEncoding = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.

Make sure the font can display Unicode/UTF-8 characters (like Lucida Console).

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char AceOfSpades = '\u1F0A0'; immediately upon typing gives me the error "Too many characters in character literal" This still shows up with either of the Unicode or UTF8 encodings. If I try to display '\u1F0A' like above... With Unicode it shows '?' With UTF8 it shows 3 characters. –  Nigel Colpitts Mar 2 '13 at 1:03
    
@Nigel you have to write string ace = "\U0001F0A0" if you convert this to a char array you will notice that it has a length of 2 because the ace of spades character is on an extended plane in UTF-16 and so has to represented by two 16 bit chars called a 'surrogate pair'. Hence, you can't store the ace of spades character in a single char which can only take 16 bits. –  Ed A Jul 20 '13 at 16:56

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