Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to get text to be on top (or in front of) a CSS shape. It works with border-bottom, but not with border-top (which is what I need it to look like). I am assuming that because the border-top property is set that it's pushing the text below the shape.

Not too sure how to get it to work correctly without having to use an image. I could have swore I've seen this done before, but I can't remember where.

Here's my fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/ultraloveninja/W2SPd/

<h1>the trap</h1>
h1 {
    border-top: 100px solid red;
    border-left: 50px solid transparent;
    border-right: 50px solid transparent;
    height: 0;
    width: 100px;
}
share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers 4

You need 2 elements and 2 CSS styles. One for the text, and one for the background:

<h1><div>the trap</div></h1>

CSS

h1 {
    border-top: 100px solid red;
    border-left: 50px solid transparent;
    border-right: 50px solid transparent;
    height: 0;
    width: 100px;
}
h1 div {
    position: relative;
    top: -100px;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/vPt7h/

share|improve this answer
    
I tried to nestle that into a span tag but I wasn't using a negative for the top value. But your's and the other above works. Thanks! –  ultraloveninja Mar 1 '13 at 23:36
add comment

You can insert a span tag for the text and get:

h1 {
    border-top: 100px solid red;
    border-left: 50px solid transparent;
    border-right: 50px solid transparent;
    height: 0;
    width: 100px;
    position:relative;
}
h1 span {
   position: absolute;
    top: -100px;
}

Demo http://jsfiddle.net/W2SPd/10/

Feasible?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Simply create a new pseudo element :after and then style the pseudo element with the border styles instead :)

The advantages? You don't have to create new elements just for the style alone, or use unnecessary nesting/wrapping with no semantic meaning; and it is not an image-based solution. The drawback - requires browser support for pseudo elements, so may not work on old versions of IE... but that's not something you should worry about.

h1 {
    width: 100px;
    padding: 0 50px; /* To account for the left and right borders in pseudo element to ensure it lines up */
}
h1:after {
    content: " ";
    display: block;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    border-top: 100px solid red;
    border-left: 50px solid transparent;
    border-right: 50px solid transparent;
    z-index: -1; /* Displays pseudo element behind text */
    width: 100px;
}

See fiddle here - http://jsfiddle.net/teddyrised/W2SPd/11/

share|improve this answer
    
Sweet, thanks! Yeah, I was trying to get it to work with :after, but I must have been missing something. Thanks! –  ultraloveninja Mar 1 '13 at 23:54
add comment

That's really a bad way to do it imo. It will still take up more space than needed and you're asking for potential problems down the road. Yes you can use the examples others have provided but if it were me, I would make the shape an image and use it as a background via CSS.

.myShape { background:url(/pathto/your/image.png); width:150px; height:100px; }
share|improve this answer
    
or even a sprite border. Though it wouldn't be as reliable as background, it would give you more flexibility. –  kcdwayne Mar 1 '13 at 23:36
3  
"Not too sure how to get it to work correctly without having to use an image." - OP –  DJDavid98 Mar 1 '13 at 23:36
1  
I can imagine several reasons why one might not want to use images. They require a separate request, are more difficult to change the color dynamically, etc. –  p.s.w.g Mar 1 '13 at 23:36
    
@DJDavid98 technically, it's a background, not an image. <img> is an image, and would indeed be clunky. –  kcdwayne Mar 1 '13 at 23:38
    
@p.s.w.g I agree, but there are ways to make it editable without a physical 'image', like .svg images, for example. Negative margins have gotten me into trouble, so I consider them bad practice. –  kcdwayne Mar 1 '13 at 23:41
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.