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Update: I think it's fixed. Thanks guys!

I'm getting an error, and I just can't figure it out. I have this code:

//A Structure with one variable and a constructor
struct Structure{
  public:
    int dataMember;

    Structure(int param);
};

//Implemented constructor
Structure::Structure(int param){
    dataMember = param;
}

//A class (which I don't plan to instantiate), 
//that has a static object made from Structure inside of it
class unInstantiatedClass{
  public:   
    static Structure structObject;
};

//main(), where I try to put the implementation of the Structure from my class,
//by calling its constructor
int main(){
    //error on the line below
    Structure unInstantiatedClass::structObject(5);

    return 0;
}

On the line that says "Structure unInstantiatedClass::structObject(5);", I get an error that reads:

error: invalid use of qualified-name 'unInstantiatedClass::structObject'

I've googled this error and looked through several forum posts, but everybody's problems seem to be different. I've also tried googling "static struct object inside class" and other related phrases, but haven't found any that I think really relate to my problem.

What I'm trying to do here is: Have a class which I don't ever instantiate. and Have, inside that class, a static object, which has a variable that can be set via constructor.

Any help is appreciated. Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

The definition of the static member can't be inside a function:

class unInstantiatedClass{
  public:   
    static Structure structObject;
};

Structure unInstantiatedClass::structObject(5);

int main() {
    // Do whatever the program should do
}
share|improve this answer
    
Aha! I think this works! Thanks to you, and thanks to everybody who gave answers. –  David Vaughan Mar 2 '13 at 0:34

I think that the problem is that Structure unInstantiatedClass::structObject(5); is within main. Put it ouside.

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Yeah, that's right. Thank you! –  David Vaughan Mar 2 '13 at 0:46

You would want to use this code:

UPDATE: Moved the initialization of the static member to global scope.

// In global scope, initialize the static member
Structure unInstantiatedClass::structObject(5);

int main(){
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
No, it's already an instance and it's initialized, seeing it's static –  Tony The Lion Mar 2 '13 at 0:29
    
I don't have a compiler handy, but surely that will give the same error? The problem is that the definition can't be inside a function, and changing the initialisation style from direct to copy won't make a difference to that. –  Mike Seymour Mar 2 '13 at 0:31
    
I agree. I believe the static member initialization should be moved to global scope. –  Tuxdude Mar 2 '13 at 0:33
    
Thank you! This does seem to work –  David Vaughan Mar 2 '13 at 0:34

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