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Suppose a header file myheader.hxx defines a class template A in which a non-templated class B is defined (that does not depend on the template parameter of A):

template<class T>
class A {
    class B { 
        // ...
    };
};

Is it okay in this case to implement B in myheader.hxx, or do I need to write a separate myheader.cxx to avoid duplicate definitions at link time? Is this case handeled consistently by different compilers?

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1  
B does depend on the template parameter T in your example. Not directly, but A<int>::B and A<double>::B are unrelated types. –  Yakk Mar 2 '13 at 2:07
1  
Probably doesn't matter but I think typename T is preferred to class T nowadays. At least that's what "the cool kids" seem to do. –  Stephen Lin Mar 2 '13 at 2:11
    
@StephenLin - yes, some people think it's cool to use typename here, but class is correct, shorter, and it's the way the C++ standard writes templates. There is no good technical reason to use typename instead of class. –  Pete Becker Mar 2 '13 at 13:39
    
@PeteBecker yes, I know thre's no techical reason, I was being facetious...but class is only really allowed for backward compatibility. It would have been a new keyword from the beginning but Bjarne was worried about the possible disruption, and it's clearer to use the new keyword for it now that it exists. –  Stephen Lin Mar 2 '13 at 18:20
    
@StephenLin - it's not clearer, it's just different. As I said, the C++ standard uses class everywhere. –  Pete Becker Mar 2 '13 at 18:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's still either a template (or part of template, don't know the ultra-precise definitions) even if it's not the top-level template, so you need to should implement it in the header (technically, it can be in a source file if that's the only place it's used, but that probably defeats the purpose).

Note: if you're not going to implement its member functions inline with the class definition, you need syntax like:

template<typename T>
void A<T>::B::foo(...)
{
    // ...
}

Also, because it's come up before, if B happened to have its own template parameter, it would be something like:

template<typename T>
template<typename T2>
void A<T>::B<T2>::foo(...)
{
    // ...
}

Not:

template<typename T, typename T2>
void A<T>::B<T2>::foo(...)
{
    // ...
}

Or if B didn't but B::foo did, it would be:

template<typename T>
template<typename T2>
// void A<T>::B::foo<T2>(...) // not this apparently
void A<T>::B::foo(...)
{
    // ...
}

EDIT: apparently it's foo above instead of foo<T2> for a function, at least with GCC (so almost 100% sure that's standard behavior)...I'm sure some language lawyer will be able to explain why :)

Etc.

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