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Scenario: I am developing a Swing app which connects to a webservice created by .NET (WCF). Had a few issues, but mostly resolved now. However, I can't seem to update boolean properties. In my entity, I have a boolean property Gender:

True = Male,

False = Female,

Null = Unknown/Unspecified.

CODE:

updatedEntry.setGender(factory.createBoolean(true));

Here, factory is just an instance of the ObjectFactory class generated for me by Netbeans. updatedEntry is of type JAXBElement<Boolean> and I can see that the value is indeed set to True. The update method runs fine without any errors but then I see the database has NULL for that column. This is very weird because the other columns are updated just fine.

Just to make sure there wasn't something wrong with my web service, I used SoapUI and manually input the parameters.. it worked fine. One thing I noticed was that I could not use the string True, but had to input a 1 for it to work. Which makes me wonder; is the JAXBElement or some other generated code from my Netbeans project sending the value as true instead of 1? Though, if that were the case then why did SoapUI throw me an error when I tried that but Netbeans did not? Like I said.. from Netbeans, all the properties were updated EXCEPT the Gender.

Is there some way I can view the generated Soap XML that is generated by Netbeans? Or does anyone have any ideas..., seen this issue before?

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Is this a consequence of specifying three possible values for gender? –  trashgod Mar 2 '13 at 7:10
    
@trashgod, is that a problem in Java? In C# we can create a nullable boolean. How do I overcome this issue? Maybe I can change my code to make it only true/false.. but there must be a proper fix because how would I deal with this with code I don't own the source to? :-| –  Matt Mar 2 '13 at 13:54
    
Sorry, I'm not familiar with your framework. Does it offer a more suitable factory, i.e. a conceptual equivalent of factory.createTrivalent(1). –  trashgod Mar 2 '13 at 18:12
    
Hi. No framework here. I have a brand new project created in Netbeans and I added a reference to a webservice. The code for working with the webservice is all generated by Netbeans. –  Matt Mar 3 '13 at 4:08

1 Answer 1

Below is an example that will help.

XML Schema - schema.xsd

You will get a property of type JAXBElement<Boolean> when you have an element that is both nillable="true" and minOccurs="0".

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<schema xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" 
    targetNamespace="http://www.example.org/schema"
    xmlns:tns="http://www.example.org/schema" 
    elementFormDefault="qualified">

    <element name="root">
        <complexType>
            <sequence>
                <element name="trueValue" type="boolean" minOccurs="0" nillable="true"/>
                <element name="falseValue" type="boolean" minOccurs="0" nillable="true"/>
                <element name="nullValue" type="boolean" minOccurs="0" nillable="true"/>
                <element name="notSetValue" type="boolean" minOccurs="0" nillable="true"/>
            </sequence>
        </complexType>
    </element>

</schema>

Generated Model - Root

Below is what the class generated from the root elemnent might look like:

@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
@XmlType(name = "", propOrder = {"trueValue", "falseValue", "nullValue", "notSetValue"})
@XmlRootElement(name = "root")
public class Root {

    @XmlElementRef(name = "trueValue", namespace = "http://www.example.org/schema", type = JAXBElement.class, required = false)
    protected JAXBElement<Boolean> trueValue;
    @XmlElementRef(name = "falseValue", namespace = "http://www.example.org/schema", type = JAXBElement.class, required = false)
    protected JAXBElement<Boolean> falseValue;
    @XmlElementRef(name = "nullValue", namespace = "http://www.example.org/schema", type = JAXBElement.class, required = false)
    protected JAXBElement<Boolean> nullValue;
    @XmlElementRef(name = "notSetValue", namespace = "http://www.example.org/schema", type = JAXBElement.class, required = false)
    protected JAXBElement<Boolean> notSetValue;

}

Generated Model - ObjectFactory

@XmlRegistry
public class ObjectFactory {

    private final static QName _RootNullValue_QNAME = new QName("http://www.example.org/schema", "nullValue");
    private final static QName _RootTrueValue_QNAME = new QName("http://www.example.org/schema", "trueValue");
    private final static QName _RootFalseValue_QNAME = new QName("http://www.example.org/schema", "falseValue");
    private final static QName _RootNotSetValue_QNAME = new QName("http://www.example.org/schema", "notSetValue");

    public ObjectFactory() {
    }

    public Root createRoot() {
        return new Root();
    }

    @XmlElementDecl(namespace = "http://www.example.org/schema", name = "nullValue", scope = Root.class)
    public JAXBElement<Boolean> createRootNullValue(Boolean value) {
        return new JAXBElement<Boolean>(_RootNullValue_QNAME, Boolean.class, Root.class, value);
    }

    @XmlElementDecl(namespace = "http://www.example.org/schema", name = "trueValue", scope = Root.class)
    public JAXBElement<Boolean> createRootTrueValue(Boolean value) {
        return new JAXBElement<Boolean>(_RootTrueValue_QNAME, Boolean.class, Root.class, value);
    }

    @XmlElementDecl(namespace = "http://www.example.org/schema", name = "falseValue", scope = Root.class)
    public JAXBElement<Boolean> createRootFalseValue(Boolean value) {
        return new JAXBElement<Boolean>(_RootFalseValue_QNAME, Boolean.class, Root.class, value);
    }

    @XmlElementDecl(namespace = "http://www.example.org/schema", name = "notSetValue", scope = Root.class)
    public JAXBElement<Boolean> createRootNotSetValue(Boolean value) {
        return new JAXBElement<Boolean>(_RootNotSetValue_QNAME, Boolean.class, Root.class, value);
    }

}

Demo

Below is some demo code that will populate each of the JAXBElement<Boolean> properties differently to demonstrate each of 4 possible options.

public class Demo {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        JAXBContext jc = JAXBContext.newInstance("forum15170433");

        Root root = new Root();
        ObjectFactory objectFactory = new ObjectFactory();

        // set the value to true
        root.setTrueValue(objectFactory.createRootTrueValue(true));

        // set the value to false
        root.setFalseValue(objectFactory.createRootFalseValue(false));

        // set the value to null
        root.setNullValue(objectFactory.createRootNullValue(null));

        // specify the value is unset
        root.setNotSetValue(null);

        Marshaller marshaller = jc.createMarshaller();
        marshaller.setProperty(Marshaller.JAXB_FORMATTED_OUTPUT, true);
        marshaller.marshal(root, System.out);
    }

}

Output

Below is the output from running the demo code. We see that the xsi:nil attribute is used to represent the null value and the unset value is not marshalled.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<root xmlns="http://www.example.org/schema">
    <trueValue>true</trueValue>
    <falseValue>false</falseValue>
    <nullValue xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:nil="true"/>
</root>
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