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Im trying to make a function that does division with out the / symbol

long  q(int nm1, int nm2)
{
  long q = 0;

   while ( num1 > num2)
    {
    some subtraction here    
    }
return q;

}

the idea is to assume the input is in order and the first is to be divided by the second. This means subtract the second from the first until the second is less then the first number.

I tried many different ways to do this but for what ever reason I cant hit it.

For now I am assuming the number is positive and wont return division by zero (I can fix that later by calling my other functions)

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1  
Well, how about you show us one of the "many different ways" you tried, maybe the one you think is closest? This is not really a programming problem, you just need to know how you would do it on a piece of paper and then translate it into code. –  us2012 Mar 2 '13 at 6:28
3  
Does exp(log(nm1) - log(nm2)) count? –  FatalError Mar 2 '13 at 6:31
1  
@IcyFlame Fraction is ignored, just like the built-in / operator. –  Barmar Mar 2 '13 at 6:33
1  
@IcyFlame Im not looking for perfection here if I wanted that ill just float the / symbol also have your heard of static insertion statements? they force what ever in the insert stream to be constrained to what ever you want. –  user2001875 Mar 2 '13 at 6:36
1  
no matter just got the loop to work after that i can add on. I have like 40 extra functions that deal with situations. This one for what ever reason was an issue for me. –  user2001875 Mar 2 '13 at 6:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This means subtract the the second from the first until the second is less than the first number.

And what's the problem with that?

int div(int num, int den)
{
    int frac;
    for (frac = 0; num >= den; num -= den, frac++)
        ;

    return frac;
}
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You will get only the integer part of the answer here. Not the decimal part. How do you plan to deal with that? –  IcyFlame Mar 2 '13 at 6:31
    
You need to handle division by 0 and negative numbers, but the basic idea is sound. –  Antimony Mar 2 '13 at 6:31
1  
@icyflame In no way. Integer division truncates. (Go grab some general sense of C before smartassing others...) –  user529758 Mar 2 '13 at 6:31
    
not sure I keep trying it and get off by ones –  user2001875 Mar 2 '13 at 6:32
    
Well, in case you noticed a/3.0 gives a float as an answer. @us2012 –  IcyFlame Mar 2 '13 at 6:33

What you're original post is trying to do is the Division by repeated subtraction algorithm. Have a look at Wikipedia:

The simplest division algorithm, historically incorporated into a greatest common divisor algorithm presented in Euclid's Elements, Book VII, Proposition 1, finds the remainder given two positive integers using only subtractions and comparisons

while  N ≥ D do
  N := N - D
end
return N

Just add a counter in your while loop to keep track of the number of iterations (which is what you will want to return) and after your loop N will contain your remainder (if it is not 0 of course).

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This code will work only if the num and den are integer values.

int main( int num, int den )
    {
        if(den==0)
        {
            return 1;
        }
        else
        {
            while(num!=0)
            {
                num = num - den;    
            }
        }
       return 0;         
    }
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Just improving the above answer slightly. Use modulus

long div(int num, int den)
{
    int frac;
    int num2 = num;

    for (frac = 0; num2 >= den; num2 -= den, frac++)
        ;
// i needed the original num and den. 

  return ( (long) frac )+( num % den );

// casts frac to long then adds the modulus remainder of the values.
}
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does this help any? –  JWW Mar 2 '13 at 7:06
1  
No. This is (a) wrong, and (b) if you had an assignment to implement division without /, then % wouldn't be allowed either. –  us2012 Mar 2 '13 at 7:10

just a bit optimization: you don't want to have linear time complexity with the input value

int div(int num, int den)
{
    int result = 0;
    int i;
    long long x;
    long long y;
    if (num < 0) return -div(-num, den);
    if (den < 0) return -div(num, den);
    if (num < den) return 0;

    x = num;
    y = den;
    i = 0;
    while((i < 32) && (x > (y << (i+1)))) i++;
    for(;i>0; i++)
    {
       if (x > (y << i))
       {
           x -= y;
           result += 1 << i; 
       }
    } 

    return result;
}
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