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HOMEWORK: Please guide me help guide me without posting complete code

My instructor is having us implement a LinkedList as a homework assignment. Here is the header for the shell of the class:

public class LinkedList<T> implements Iterable<T>, Iterator<T>

Note he is implementing the Iterable and Iterator interfaces. I then understand that I need to implement an iterator(), hasNext(), next(), and remove() methods in my class. What confuses me though is that he does not put the methods required for the Iterator interface in a separate inner class. All of the methods below are defined in the LinkedList class:

/*
 * (non-Javadoc)
 * 
 * @see java.lang.Iterable#iterator()
 */
@Override
public Iterator<T> iterator()
{
    return null;
}

/*
 * (non-Javadoc)
 * 
 * @see java.util.Iterator#hasNext()
 */
@Override
public boolean hasNext()
{
    return false;
}

/*
 * (non-Javadoc)
 * 
 * @see java.util.Iterator#next()
 */
@Override
public T next()
{
    return null;
}

/*
 * (non-Javadoc)
 * 
 * @see java.util.Iterator#remove()
 */
@Override
public void remove()
{

}

Shouldn't the iterator() method be returning something like:

public Iterator<T> iterator()
{
    return new MyClassIterator(front);
}

Where MyClassIterator() is defined with the hasNext(), next(), and remove() methods. What am I missing?

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2  
You're right, that's confusing. Collections don't usually implement Iterator (the iterator does). You could still implement the iterator as in inner class, and just delegate the Iterator methods to your iterator, i.e. hasNext() would be return iterator().hasNext(); But that iterator() method should be updated as you suggest. –  Hound Dog Mar 2 '13 at 6:33
    
This is not only confusing, this is plain wrong, as explained by @Patricia below. –  Flavio Mar 2 '13 at 8:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is really a comment, but has to be posted as an answer because it would be too long and hard to read in the comment format.

Be very careful with having the Iterable implementation implement Iterator. There can be more than one iterator running for the same Iterable at the same time. Here is a test program that demonstrates this:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.List;

public class Test {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<String> myList = Arrays.asList(new String[] { "aaa", "bbb", "ccc" });
    Iterator<String> iter1 = myList.iterator();
    System.out.println("iter1: " + iter1.next());
    System.out.println("iter1: " + iter1.next());
    Iterator<String> iter2 = myList.iterator();
    for (String s; iter2.hasNext();) {
      s = iter2.next();
      System.out.println("iter2: " + s);
    }
    System.out.println("iter1.hasNext(): " + iter1.hasNext());
    System.out.println("iter2.hasNext(): " + iter2.hasNext());
    System.out.println("iter1: " + iter1.next());
  }
}

It prints:

iter1: aaa
iter1: bbb
iter2: aaa
iter2: bbb
iter2: ccc
iter1.hasNext(): true
iter2.hasNext(): false
iter1: ccc

The risk with having the Iterable implement Iterator is that you will end up with one iterator state for both iterators, and advancing iter2 will affect iter1.

Of course, the clean solution is to have a private class in your Iterable implementation that implements Iterator, and create a new instance of it for each iterator() call. iter1 and iter2 then reference different objects, and changes to the state of iter2 do not affect iter1.

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