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I have to convert some existing code using ADO.NET to a parallel processing scenario. The original code uses static connection objects and a transaction, so it has required some considerable restructuring.

As a proof of concept, I have been having a go at getting some simple inserts working in a stable manner using the Task Parallel Library. I found I have had to write some strange code to do so. Firstly, the Main method in my Console app:

class Program
{
    private static Db db1;
    private static Db db2;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        db1 = new Db();
        db2 = new Db();

        Task task1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
           {
               db1.BeginTransaction("Transaction1");
               decimal p = AddNewProject(db1, "Project 1");
               AddNewTask(db1, p, "Task1");
           });


        Task task2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                db2.BeginTransaction("Transaction1");
                decimal p = AddNewProject(db2, "Project 2");
                AddNewTask(db2, p, "Task1");
            });

        db1.Dispose();
        db2.Dispose();

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static decimal AddNewProject(Db db, string name)
    {
        return db.InsertNewProject(name);
    }

    static void AddNewTask(Db db, decimal project, string name)
    {
        db.InsertNewTask(project, name);
    }
}

And importantly, the Db class with the strange code:

public class Db : IDisposable
{
    private SqlConnection connection;
    private String connString;
    private SqlTransaction transaction;

    public Db()
    {
        connString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["MyConn"].ConnectionString;
        this.connection = new SqlConnection();
        this.connection.StateChange += new StateChangeEventHandler(connection_StateChange);
        this.connection.ConnectionString = connString;
        this.connection.Open();
    }

    void connection_StateChange(object sender, StateChangeEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.CurrentState != ConnectionState.Open)
        {
            this.connection.ConnectionString = this.connString;
            this.connection.Open();
        }
    }

    public void BeginTransaction(string vendorName)
    {
        while (this.connection.State != ConnectionState.Open)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(10);
        }

        this.transaction = this.connection.BeginTransaction(IsolationLevel.ReadUncommitted, vendorName);
    }

    public decimal InsertNewProject(string name)
    {
        SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand();
        command.Connection = this.connection;
        command.CommandType = CommandType.Text;

        if (this.connection.State != ConnectionState.Open)
        {
            this.connection.ConnectionString = this.connString;
            this.connection.Open();
        }

        command.CommandText = "INSERT INTO Project VALUES('" + name + "', 'true');SELECT SCOPE_IDENTITY();";
        command.Transaction = this.transaction;

        Object pk = command.ExecuteScalar();

        return (decimal)pk;
    }

    public int InsertNewTask(decimal project, string name)
    {
        SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand();
        command.Connection = this.connection;
        command.CommandType = CommandType.Text;

        if (this.connection.State != ConnectionState.Open)
        {
            this.connection.ConnectionString = this.connString;
            this.connection.Open();
        }

        command.CommandText = "INSERT INTO Task([TaskName], [Project], [Visible], [Estimate]) VALUES('" + name + "', '" + (int)project + "', 'true', 0);SELECT SCOPE_IDENTITY();";
        command.Transaction = this.transaction;

        Object pk = command.ExecuteScalar();
        this.transaction.Commit();
        //this.transaction.Rollback();
        return Convert.ToInt32((decimal)pk);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        this.connection.Close();
        //this.transaction.Dispose();
        this.connection.Dispose();
    }
}

The two weird bits which are required to make this work are the:

  1. StateChange handler (and why I should have to handle this at all?!)
  2. BeginTransaction method, and the constant checks and opening of the connection in the methods of the class

Why doesn't the connection just stay open? Ever so strange. This code makes me nervous and I'm not so eager to put it into UAT (then production).

The connection string is:

<connectionStrings>
    <add name="MyConn" connectionString="Data Source=PLAGUIS;Initial Catalog=TimeTracker;Pooling=false;MultipleActiveResultSets=True;Integrated Security=True"
        providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />
</connectionStrings>

I found I had to turn off Connection Pooling.

If anyone can explain the best way of using connections and different threads (Tasks), I'd be much obliged.

share|improve this question
    
"I found I had to turn off Connection Pooling" - Why? –  Jean Hominal Mar 2 '13 at 9:50
    
@JeanHominal Good question. I turned it back on and had no problems. I thought it was responsible for some of the early errors. Apparently not the culprit. Thanks. –  onefootswill Mar 2 '13 at 10:32

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