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I have a huge array of words. I want to count how many times two specific words occur less than some given distance apart.

For example, if the distance between "time" and "late" is no more than three words, then I want to increment a counter. The words "time" and "late" can appear hundreds of times in the array. How can I find the number of time they occur near each other?

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1  
possible duplicate of In Perl, how can I find the index of a given value in an array? –  Quentin Mar 2 '13 at 9:43
    
Edited the question to match the one asked in comments below. –  Ilmari Karonen Dec 28 '13 at 17:47

3 Answers 3

You didn't ask a question, so I presume you are having coming up with an algorithm.

  1. Iterate through the indexes.
    1. If the first word is found at that index,
      1. Note that index.
    2. If the second word is found at that index,
      1. Note that index.
  2. Subtract one index from the other.

Notes:

  • You might want to add checks to make sure each word was found.
  • You didn't specify what should happen when one of the words occurs more than once.

For the question asked in the comments:

  1. Iterate through the indexes.
    1. If the first word is found at that index,
      1. Note that index.
    2. If the second word is found at that index,
      1. If the difference between the current index and the noted index is ≤ 3,
        1. Increment the counter.

Notes:

  • Assumes you only care about the distance between the second word and the previous instance of the first word.
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Also if array is sorted, this can be done with bsearch so alot faster –  PSIAlt Mar 2 '13 at 10:12
    
Hi. if distance between "time" and "late" <=3 then count++ "time" and "late" can appear a 100 times in the array. how do i add checks so that the words aren't recounted? –  user2126344 Mar 2 '13 at 10:30
    
@user2126344, updated. –  ikegami Mar 2 '13 at 10:40

Using index hash would be quite effective solution:

my @words = qw( word1 word2 word3 word4 word5 word6 );

# That can be expensive, but you do it only once
my %index;
@index{@words} = (0..$#words);

# That will be real quick
my $distance = $index{"word6"} - $index{"word2"}
print "Distance: $distance \n";

Output of the script above would be:

Distance: 4

Note: creating index hash can be expensive. But if you plan to do many distance checks, it could be worth it, as any lookup is quick then (constant time, not event log(n)).

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Downside: You have to process the entire list even if the two words you want are the first two words. –  ikegami Mar 2 '13 at 10:04
    
That's true. On the other hand once the index hash has been created, it can be used to do lookups quickly. So it's some tradeoff. I'll note this in the answer. –  kamituel Mar 2 '13 at 10:08
    
Without reserving necessary amount of hash buckets this can be O(n log n), so added reverve to the answ –  PSIAlt Mar 2 '13 at 10:16
    
Inserting N elements into a hash is O(N), so it's O(N) without prereserving. –  ikegami Mar 2 '13 at 10:20
    
@ikegami yes, in case when rehash does not occur. OP says that array is huge, so rehashes will take place. –  PSIAlt Mar 2 '13 at 10:21

Does it need to support duplicate words?

#! /usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use constant DEBUG => 0;

my @words;
if( $ARGV[0] && -f $ARGV[0] ) {
    open my $fh, "<", $ARGV[0] or die "Could not read $ARGV[0], because: $!\n";
    my $hughTestFile = do { local $/; <$fh> };
    @words = split /[\s\n]/, $hughTestFile;  # $#words == 10M words with my test.log
    # Test words (below) were manually placed at equal distances (~every 900K words) in test.log
    # With above, TESTS ran in avg of 15 seconds.  Likely test.log was in buffers/cache.
} else {
    @words = qw( word1 word2 word3 word4 word5 word6 word7 word8 word4 word9 word0 );
}

sub IndexOf {
    my $searchFor = shift;
    return undef if( !$searchFor );
    my $Nth = shift || 1;

    my $length = $#words;
    my $cntr = 0;
    for my $word (@words) {
        if( $word eq $searchFor ) {
            $Nth--;
            return $cntr if( $Nth == 0 );
        }
        $cntr++;
    }
    return undef;
}

sub Distance {
# args:  <1st word>, <2nd word>, [occurrence_of_1st_word], [occurrence_of_2nd_word]
# for occurrence counts:  0, 1 & undef - all have the same effect (1st occurrence)
    my( $w1, $w2 ) = ($_[0], $_[1]);
    my( $n1, $n2 ) = ($_[2] || undef, $_[3] || undef );
    die "Missing words\n" if( !$w1 );
    $w2 = $w1 if( !$w2 );

    my( $i1, $i2 ) = ( IndexOf($w1, $n1), IndexOf($w2, $n2) );
    if( defined($i1) && defined($i2) ) {
        my $offset = $i1-$i2;
        print "  Distance (offset) = $offset\n";
        return undef;
    } elsif( !defined($i1) && !defined($i2) ) {
        print "  Neither words were ";
    } elsif( !defined($i1) ) {
        print "  First word was not ";
    } else {
        print "  Second word was not ";
    }
    print "found in list\n";

    return undef;
}

# TESTS
print "Your array has ".$#words." words\n";
print "When 1st word is AFTER 2nd word:\n";
Distance( "word7", "word3" );
print "When 1st word is BEFORE 2nd word:\n";
Distance( "word2", "word5" );
print "When 1st word == 2nd word:\n";
Distance( "word4", "word4" );
print "When 1st word doesn't exist:\n";
Distance( "word00", "word6" );
print "When 2nd word doesn't exist:\n";
Distance( "word1", "word99" );
print "When neither 1st or 2nd words exist:\n";
Distance( "word00", "word99" );
print "When the 1st word is AFTER the 2nd OCCURRENCE of 2nd word:\n";
Distance( "word9", "word4", 0, 2 );
print "When the 1st word is BEFORE the 2nd OCCURRENCE of the 2nd word:\n";
Distance( "word7", "word4", 1, 2 );
print "When the 2nd OCCURRENCE of the 2nd word doesn't exist:\n";
Distance( "word7", "word99", 0, 2 );
print "When the 2nd OCCURRENCE of the 1st word is AFTER the 2nd word:\n";
Distance( "word4", "word2", 2, 0 );
print "When the 2nd OCCURRENCE of the 1st word is BEFORE the 2nd word:\n";
Distance( "word4", "word0", 2, 0 );
print "When the 2nd OCCURRENCE of the 1st word exists, but 2nd doesn't:\n";
Distance( "word4", "word99", 2, 0 );
print "When neither of the 2nd OCCURRENCES of the words exist:\n";
Distance( "word00", "word99", 2, 2 );
print "Distance between 2nd and 1st OCCURRENCES of the same word:\n";
Distance( "word4", "", 2, 1 );
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