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why that does not compile?

template <typename T>
class Pool{

    char Buff[sizeof(T)*256];

public:

    Pool(){
        T* item = reinterpret_cast<T*>(&Buff[0]);
        for(int i =0 ; i<256;i++)
            item[i] = new(&item[i]) T();
    }

    ~Pool(){
        T* item = reinterpret_cast<T*>(&Buff[0]);
        for(int i =0 ; i<256;i++)
            item[i] -> ~ T();   
    }

    void reset(unsigned int i){
        T* item = reinterpret_cast<T*>(&Buff[0]);
        item[i]->~T();
        item[i]->T();
    }
}

What i obviously want to achieve is calling placement new on a raw memory array (that should call constructor ok). Then I want to call destructor and constructor of items in the array. The problem is that Item is template and so if I use

Pool<FooBar>

the compiler expect to find "FooBar()" and "~FooBar()" instead of "T()" and "~T()". is there any particular syntax to do that?

I'm using C++03 not C++11

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your syntax isn't quite right. The following should do the trick:

Pool() {
    T* item = reinterpret_cast<T*>(&Buff[0]);
    for(int i = 0; i < 256; i++)
        new(&item[i]) T();
}

~Pool() {
    T* item = reinterpret_cast<T*>(&Buff[0]);
    for (int i = 0; i < 256; i++)
        item[i].~T();
}

void reset(unsigned int i) {
    T* item = reinterpret_cast<T*>(&Buff[0]);
    item[i].~T();
    new(&item[i]) T();
}
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1  
+1 Literally verbatim to what I was about to post (save for the last new, call, where I had new(item+i) T();. –  WhozCraig Mar 2 '13 at 10:04
    
thanks, seems that GCC generates the same assembly for both (item+i) and (&item[i]), thanks for appointing that, maybe (item+i) is more clear to read. –  DarioOO Mar 2 '13 at 10:14
1  
@DarioOO Eh. To each their own. Some prefer the way you have it. I was always a pointer-arithmetic kinda guy. –  WhozCraig Mar 2 '13 at 10:16
    
@DarioOO: Semantically, they're exactly equivalent. The choice is purely stylistic. –  NPE Mar 2 '13 at 10:18
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