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In Ruby, we can merge hashes by using the merge function:

1.9.3-p194 :038 > h1 = { "a" => 1, "b" => [1] }
 => {"a"=>1, "b"=>[1]} 
1.9.3-p194 :039 > h2 = { "a" => 2, "b" => [2] }
 => {"a"=>2, "b"=>[2]} 
1.9.3-p194 :040 > h1.merge(h2)
 => {"a"=>2, "b"=>[2]} 

Merging overwrites the arrays inside the hashes, but I would like it to join them.

 => {"a"=>2, "b"=>[1, 2]}

Is there a ruby function or one-liner to accomplish this?

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do you want some thing like this ?? ruby-1.9.2 > a = {:car => {:color => "red"}} => {:car=>{:color=>"red"}} ruby-1.9.2 > b = {:car => {:speed => "100mph"}} => {:car=>{:speed=>"100mph"}} ruby-1.9.2 > a.merge(b) {|key, a_val, b_val| a_val.merge b_val } => {:car=>{:color=>"red", :speed=>"100mph"}} –  X-Factor Mar 2 '13 at 10:04
    
If you have two hashes, options and defaults, and you want to merge defaults into options without overwriting existing keys, what you really want to do is the reverse: merge options into defaults: options = defaults.merge(options) Or, if you're using Rails you can do: options.reverse_merge!(defaults) –  X-Factor Mar 2 '13 at 10:06
    
@X-Factor This is about option hashes, the ones you pass to as_json, that contain { except: [:this, :that] }. I don't want to override the except, I want to add to the except. Your solution doesn't take the arrays into account. –  alestanis Mar 2 '13 at 10:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can add extra behavior to the merge method

h1 = { "a" => 1, "b" => [1] }
h2 = { "a" => 2, "b" => [2] }

h1.merge(h2) {|key, first, second| first.is_a?(Array) && second.is_a?(Array) ? first | second : second }
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Very nice solution, I didn't know you could pass a block to the merge method. And I didn't know the Array | Array operator either. Thanks! –  alestanis Mar 2 '13 at 10:22

You can pass in a block to merge, which looks like it was designed especially for cases like this.

a = { x: 1, y: [1] }
b = { x: 2, y: [2] }
a.merge(b) {|k, a, b| a.is_a?(Array) && b.is_a?(Array) ? a + b : b}
=> { x: 2, y: [1, 2] }
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what if a = { x: 1, y: [2] } and b = { x: 2, y: [2] }? It will create { x: 2, y: [2, 2] }! shouldn't it be only [2] instead of [2, 2] –  Manoj Monga Mar 2 '13 at 10:21
    
Thanks! With my example your solution yields {"a"=>2, "b"=>[1, 2, 1]} though –  alestanis Mar 2 '13 at 10:21
    
@SybariteManoj It really depends on whether he wants to merge or concatenate the contents of the arrays. –  AlistairIsrael Mar 3 '13 at 1:44
    
@AlistairIsrael yes, you're right.. :) –  Manoj Monga Mar 3 '13 at 7:38

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