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I have an endpoint generated as follows:

public Book insertBook(Book book) {
    PersistenceManager mgr = getPersistenceManager();
    try {
        if (containsShout(book)) {
            throw new EntityExistsException("Object already exists");
        }
        mgr.makePersistent(book);
    } finally {
        mgr.close();
    }
    return book;
}

I wonder how I should return errors to the client. E.g. the book contains some required fields, an ISNM check etc.

So I would assume throwing an exception but how does this map to the returned json response. The json repsonse should contain all field errors to highlight these fields in the client.

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Did you manage to solve this issue? If how did you do it? –  dynamokaj Jan 16 at 23:55
    
No, but I'm not interested anymore –  Marcel Overdijk Jan 17 at 6:38

3 Answers 3

In general exceptions are mapped to a 500 http status code in the response. With the following exceptions you can get different codes: com.google.api.server.spi.response.BadRequestException -> 400 com.google.api.server.spi.response.UnauthorizedException -> 401 com.google.api.server.spi.response.ForbiddenException -> 403 com.google.api.server.spi.response.NotFoundException -> 404

If you consume your endpoint in Android the error code will be in the IOException thrown there and you can react accordingly in the catch.

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Yes I understand returning the HTTP error codes. What I wonder is how to deal with detailed error messages like violated constraints of domain properties. –  Marcel Overdijk Mar 3 '13 at 9:03
    
This is not the behaviour I'm seeing in 1.7.5. I'm throwing a BadRequestException and the client's getting a 200 with my message String in the body as a bit of JSON. –  Eliot Apr 3 '13 at 15:15
    
Let me qualify that: this doesn't work on the locahost dev server, but it does seem to work on the App Engine server, even in 1.7.5. So that's a bug in the localhost dev server really. –  Eliot Apr 3 '13 at 15:34

Im doing this by having an abstract class Entity.

It has a ResponseCode, which is an enum and a String ErrorMessage.

So "Book" could inherit from Entity. And your response could look like this:

public Book insertBook(Book book) {
    PersistenceManager mgr = getPersistenceManager();
    try {
        if (containsShout(book)) {
            book.setResponseCode(ResponseCode.ERROR);
            book.setError("Object already exists");
        } else {
            mgr.makePersistent(book);
        }
    } finally {
        mgr.close();
    }
    return book;
}
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Thanks for the answer @davibq, but this does pollute the entity classes imo. Maybe I should create a SingleEntitiyResponse containing the model, response status and errors. Note that I can do the same for com.google.api.server.spi.response.CollectionResponse by extending it and including similar repsonse status and errors. –  Marcel Overdijk Mar 5 '13 at 7:39

I tried something like this and seemed to work well for me.

class Response<T> {
   Status status; 
   String userFriendlyMessage;
   T object; //your bean or entity object

   RestResponse toRestResponse() {
      RestResponse r = new RestResponse();
      r.status = status;
      r.userFriendlyMessage = userFriendlyMessage;
      r.object = object;
   }
}

You cannot return a generic object from endpoint. So create an equivalent RestResponse class which can be created from Response.

class RestResponse {
   Status status;
   String userFriendlyMessage;
   Object object;
}

Status can be like this.

public enum Status {
   SUCCESS, RESOURCE_NOT_FOUND, RESOURCE_ALREADY_EXISTS; //etc
}

All your endpoint methods would return RestResponse which will in turn be constructed from a Response (T can be your bean or entity object).

When you deserialize your json response (RestResponse) you can straight away deserialize it as Response.

Hope this helps.

Regards, Sathya

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This does not work for me, I get: "Error: Object type T not supported." Example: public Response.RestResponse getBeer() { Response<Beer> genericResponse = new Response<Beer>(); genericResponse.status = Status.SUCCESS; genericResponse.object = new Beer(“Carlsberg”); return genericResponse.toRestResponse(); } –  dynamokaj Jan 16 at 23:49
    
@dynamokaj - can you please post some code snippets ? You can link to github or some other document. –  Sathya Jan 16 at 23:58
    
Yes here it is: gist.github.com/dynamokaj/cb0c0569311d9d15ee40 it should be like yours. However I have made the fields private and putted it into one file (ResponseDto.java) instead of three files. –  dynamokaj Jan 17 at 0:04
1  
@dynamokaj - i have a similar set up working. Can you try out the following - 1) make all fields in RestResponseDto public. (2) Remove T and make it a object in RestResponseDto. Let me know if that solves the problem. My working code is here - code.google.com/p/ishacrm/source/browse/trunk/CRMDNA/src/crmdna/… –  Sathya Jan 18 at 5:05
1  
@dynamokaj - Glad to know it works. I have edited my answer as suggested. –  Sathya Jan 20 at 6:37

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