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I have a jcombobox containing item1 and item2, also I have a jtextfield.. when I select item1 on my jcombobox I want 30 to appear on my jtextfield while 40 if Item2 was selected... How do I do that?

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closed as off-topic by kleopatra, Duncan, toniedzwiedz, Ilya, glts Oct 9 '13 at 21:02

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  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Duncan, toniedzwiedz, Ilya, glts
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

this is how you do it with ActionLIstener

import java.awt.FlowLayout;
import java.awt.event.*;

import javax.swing.*;

public class MyWind extends JFrame{

    public MyWind() {
        initialize();
    }

    private void initialize() {
        setSize(300, 300);
        setLayout(new FlowLayout(FlowLayout.LEFT));
        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        final JTextField field = new JTextField();
        field.setSize(200, 50);
        field.setText("              ");

        JComboBox comboBox = new JComboBox();
        comboBox.setEditable(true);
        comboBox.addItem("item1");
        comboBox.addItem("item2");

        //
        // Create an ActionListener for the JComboBox component.
        //
        comboBox.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event) {
                //
                // Get the source of the component, which is our combo
                // box.
                //
                JComboBox comboBox = (JComboBox) event.getSource();

                Object selected = comboBox.getSelectedItem();
                if(selected.toString().equals("item1"))
                field.setText("30");
                else if(selected.toString().equals("item2"))
                    field.setText("40");

            }
        });
        getContentPane().add(comboBox);
        getContentPane().add(field);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                new MyWind().setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }
}
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2  
I like your answer, one very minor nit pick, I might suggest you do "Item 1".equals(selected) instead - while highly unlikely, it will protect against possible NullPointerExceptions ;) –  MadProgrammer Mar 2 '13 at 10:54

The simple solution would be to use a ItemListener. When the state changes, you would simply check the currently selected item and set the text accordingly

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.event.ItemEvent;
import java.awt.event.ItemListener;
import javax.swing.JComboBox;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.JTextField;
import javax.swing.UIManager;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;

public class TestComboBox06 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TestComboBox06();
    }

    public TestComboBox06() {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException ex) {
                } catch (InstantiationException ex) {
                } catch (IllegalAccessException ex) {
                } catch (UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
                }

                JFrame frame = new JFrame("Test");
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                frame.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
                frame.add(new TestPane());
                frame.pack();
                frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }

        });
    }

    public class TestPane extends JPanel {

        private JComboBox cb;
        private JTextField field;

        public TestPane() {
            cb = new JComboBox(new String[]{"Item 1", "Item 2"});
            field = new JTextField(12);

            add(cb);
            add(field);

            cb.setSelectedItem(null);

            cb.addItemListener(new ItemListener() {
                @Override
                public void itemStateChanged(ItemEvent e) {
                    Object item = cb.getSelectedItem();
                    if ("Item 1".equals(item)) {
                        field.setText("20");
                    } else if ("Item 2".equals(item)) {
                        field.setText("30");
                    }
                }
            });
        }

    }

}

A better solution would be to create a custom object that represents the value to be displayed and the value associated with it...

Updated

Now I no longer have a 10 month chewing on my ankles, I updated the example to use a ListCellRenderer which is a more correct approach then been lazy and overriding toString

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Component;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.event.ItemEvent;
import java.awt.event.ItemListener;
import javax.swing.DefaultListCellRenderer;
import javax.swing.JComboBox;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JList;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.JTextField;
import javax.swing.UIManager;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;

public class TestComboBox06 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TestComboBox06();
    }

    public TestComboBox06() {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException ex) {
                } catch (InstantiationException ex) {
                } catch (IllegalAccessException ex) {
                } catch (UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
                }

                JFrame frame = new JFrame("Test");
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                frame.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
                frame.add(new TestPane());
                frame.pack();
                frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }

        });
    }

    public class TestPane extends JPanel {

        private JComboBox cb;
        private JTextField field;

        public TestPane() {
            cb = new JComboBox(new Item[]{
                new Item("Item 1", "20"), 
                new Item("Item 2", "30")});
            cb.setRenderer(new ItemCelLRenderer());
            field = new JTextField(12);

            add(cb);
            add(field);

            cb.setSelectedItem(null);

            cb.addItemListener(new ItemListener() {
                @Override
                public void itemStateChanged(ItemEvent e) {
                    Item item = (Item)cb.getSelectedItem();
                    field.setText(item.getValue());
                }
            });
        }

    }

    public class Item {
        private String value;
        private String text;

        public Item(String text, String value) {
            this.text = text;
            this.value = value;
        }

        public String getText() {
            return text;
        }

        public String getValue() {
            return value;
        }

    }

    public class ItemCelLRenderer extends DefaultListCellRenderer {

        @Override
        public Component getListCellRendererComponent(JList<?> list, Object value, int index, boolean isSelected, boolean cellHasFocus) {
            super.getListCellRendererComponent(list, value, index, isSelected, cellHasFocus); //To change body of generated methods, choose Tools | Templates.
            if (value instanceof Item) {
                setText(((Item)value).getText());
            }
            return this;
        }

    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much~ –  mitche027 Mar 2 '13 at 10:57
    
wrapper objects with overridden toString (instead of a proper renderer) are evil - here it might appear as halfway justifyable because you seem to need another property for anothe view ... which is a home-grown problem, because the factoring of the business object is wrong, to start with: Item itself might be the business object, and its toString overridden with a complete description instead of with something relevant to a particular view ;-) –  kleopatra Mar 2 '13 at 14:22
1  
@kleopatra I totally agree, it was a fast cut due to a limited amount of time to actually code (no excuse), bad me –  MadProgrammer Mar 2 '13 at 19:49
2  
Don't forget to include the KeySelectionManager so the items in the combo box can be selected by key stroke as well. As soon as you use a custom renderer you break the default functionality of the combo box. –  camickr Mar 2 '13 at 21:44
1  
@camickr I think every implementation is different. The use of a cell render in this case (from the perspective of the OP) MAY be overkill (hard to ascertain from the question) but by using a custom object, we marry the text/view representation with that of its associated value, it makes it easier to add, change & remove elements. I also agree with kleo, toString should be used to provide stateful information about the object and renderers should be used to format the object for display. It's unlikely you would us the Date#toString value to render dates all the time –  MadProgrammer Mar 2 '13 at 22:44

Not an answer to the original question, but an example to the how-to-make-reusable and working custom renderers without breaking MVC :-)

// WRONG
public class DataWrapper {
   final Data data;
   final String description;
   public DataWrapper(Object data, String description) {
       this.data = data;
       this.description = description;
   }
   ....
   @Override
   public String toString() {
       return description;
   } 
}
// usage
myModel.add(new DataWrapper(data1, data1.getName());

It is wrong in a MVC environment, because it is mixing data and view: now the model doesn't contain the data but a wrapper which is introduced for view reasons. That's breaking separation of concerns and encapsulation (every class interacting with the model needs to be aware of the wrapped data).

The driving forces for breaking of rules were:

  • keep functionality of the default KeySelectionManager (which is broken by a custom renderer)
  • reuse of the wrapper class (can be applied to any data type)

As in Swing a custom renderer is the small coin designed to accomodate for custom visual representation, a default manager which can't cope is ... broken. Tweaking design just to accommodate for such a crappy default is the wrong way round, kind of upside-down. The correct is, to implement a coping manager.

While re-use is fine, doing so at the price of breaking the basic architecture is not a good bargin.

We have a problem in the presentation realm, let's solve it in the presentation realm with the elements designed to solve exactly that problem. As you might have guessed, SwingX already has such a solution :-)

In SwingX, the provider of a string representation is called StringValue, and all default renderers take such a StringValue to configure themselves:

StringValue sv = new StringValue() {
     @Override
     public String getString(Object value) {
        if (value instanceof Data) {
            return ((Data) value).getSomeProperty();
        }
        return TO_STRING.getString(value);
     }
};
DefaultListRenderer renderer = new DefaultListRenderer(sv);

As the defaultRenderer is-a StringValue (implemented to delegate to the given), a well-behaved implementation of KeySelectionManager now can delegate to the renderer to find the appropriate item:

public BetterKeySelectionManager implements KeySelectionManager {

     @Override
     public int selectionForKey(char ch, ComboBoxModel model) {

         ....
         if (getCellRenderer() instance of StringValue) {
              String text = ((StringValue) getCellRenderer()).getString(model.getElementAt(row));
              ....
         } 
     }

}

Outlined the approach because it is easily implementable even without using SwingX, simply define implement something similar and use it:

  • some provider of a string representation
  • a custom renderer which is configurable by that provider and guarantees to use it in configuring itself
  • a well-behaved keySelectionManager with queries the renderer for its string represention

All except the string provider is reusable as-is (that is exactly one implemenation of the custom renderer and the keySelectionManager). There can be general implementations of the string provider, f.i. those formatting value or using bean properties via reflection. And all without breaking basic rules :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Last night I actually found a posting where you gave the same example. I didn't understand it then and I don't understand it now. Sometimes I need a concrete example before it sinks in. It seems to me like you are just creating another fancy wrapper class that invokes the getString() method instead of the toString() method. How would you use MadProgrammer's Item class and your StringValue class to add items to a ComboBoxModel? Also, since only the renderer know about the text, how do you add the ietms in sorted order. Does your StringValue class implement Comparable? –  camickr Mar 3 '13 at 19:35
    
There an many uses for a value/description pairs. For example a Product. "1" is a Hammer (to hit me on the head with), "2" is a Screwdriver. Somewhere you need to keep this mapping of value/description. So to say that an Object can't have these two properties together doesn't make any sense to me. Now that these two properties are together in a class you can choose which of the properties you want displayed in the combo box by using an appropriate renderer. –  camickr Mar 4 '13 at 0:34
    
Also, chances are your product will have multiple descriptions for different languages. So when you populate the Item class you will populate it with the appropriate description directly from your Database or resource file or whatever you use. –  camickr Mar 4 '13 at 0:41
    
@camickr you are mixing concerns again and to me it seems now that you are doing it intentionally. If you don't want to follow MVC, that's what you don't want and I'm not going to discuss that :-) Just repeating: The value (== bean, having arbitrary properties) itself belongs into the (Swing) data realm, unchanged for view reasons. The string representation in the combo is-a problem of the (Swing) view realm, so solve it there, f.i. by factoring the production of the string to use into a class which does nothing else. –  kleopatra Mar 4 '13 at 10:12
    
I'm not doing it intentionally. I am not always the best abstract thinker and sometimes need concrete examples. I still have no idea how to use your StringValue class. With regards to MVC. I honestly don't see the problem with having the value and description in the class which is added to the Model (eg. the value represents a "product id" and the description is the "description" of the product). Then you can have customized views, one of the product and one of the description. –  camickr Mar 4 '13 at 17:34

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