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Considering the following data structures what would be better to QUERY the data once stored in a database system (rdbms or nosql)? The fields within the metadata field are user defined and will differ from user to user. Possible values are Strings, Number, "Dates" or even arrays.

var file1 = {
    id: 123, name: "mypicture", owner: 1
    metadata: {
        people: ["Ben", "Tom"],
        created: 2013/01/01,
        license: "free",
        rating: 4
        ...
    },
    tags: ["tag1", "tag2", "tag3", "tag4"]
}

var file2 = {
    id: 155, name: "otherpicture", owner: 1
    metadata: {
        people: ["Tom", "Carla"],
        created: 2013/02/02,
        license: "free",
        rating: 4
        ...
    },
    tags: ["tag4", "tag5"]
}

var file1OtherUser = {
    id: 345, name: "mydocument", owner: 2
    metadata: {
        autors: ["Mike"],
        published: 2013/02/02,
        …       
    },
    tags: ["othertag"]
}

Our users should have the ability to search/filter their files:

  • User 1: Show all files where "Tom" is in "people" array
  • User 1: Show all files "created" between 2013/01/01 and 2013/02/01
  • User 1: Show all files having "license" "free" and "rating" greater 2
  • User 2: Show all files "published" in "2012" and tagged with "important"
  • ...

Results should be filtered in way like you can do in OS X with intelligent folders. The individual metadata fields are defined before files are being uploaded/stored. But they also may change after that, e.g. User 1 may rename the metadata field "people" to "cast".

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If the fields are variable, you're going to have trouble efficiently indexing the fields as there not only is a cap on the total number of indexes in a mongodb collection of 64, but a general recommendation to keep the total to less than 16. For MongoDb, you might need to flatten your structure to have keys and values in a typed or indexed collection. Have you considered how you might do a MapReduce for example with your data? –  WiredPrairie Mar 2 '13 at 13:08
    
The reason I suggested a typed index is so that all the values in a particular index are the same. –  WiredPrairie Mar 2 '13 at 13:10
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As @WiredPrairie said, the field within the metadata field look variable, maybe dependant upon what the user enters which is supported by:

User 1 may rename the metadata field "people" to "cast".

MongoDB cannot create variable indexes whereby you just say that every new field in metadata gets added to the compound index, however you could do a key-value type structure like so:

var file1 = {
    id: 123, name: "mypicture", owner: 1
    metadata: [
        {k: people, v:["Ben", "Tom"]},
        {k: created, v:2013/01/01},
    ],
    tags: ["tag1", "tag2", "tag3", "tag4"]
}

That is one method of doing this, allowing you to index on both k and v dynamically within the metadata field. You would then query by this like so:

db.col.find({metadata:{$elemMatch:{k:people,v:["Ben"]}}})

However this does introduce another problem. $elemMatch works on top level, not nested elements. Imagine you wanted to find all files where "Ben" was one of the people, you can't use $elemMatch here so you would have to do:

db.col.find({metadata.k:people,metadata.v:"Ben"})

The immediate problem with this query is in the way MongoDB queries. When it queries the metadata field it will say: where one field of "k" equals "people" and a field of "v" equals "Ben".

Since this is a multi-value field you could run into the problem where even though "Ben" is not in the peoples list, because he exists in another field on the metadata you actually pick out the wrong documents; i.e. this query would pick up:

var file1 = {
    id: 123, name: "mypicture", owner: 1
    metadata: [
        {k: people, v:["Tom"]},
        {k: created, v:2013/01/01},
        {k: person, v: "Ben"}
    ],
    tags: ["tag1", "tag2", "tag3", "tag4"]
}

The only real way to solve this is to factor off the dynamic fields to another collection where you don't have this problem.

This creates a new problem though, you can no longer get a full file with a single round trip and nor can you aggregate both the file row and its user defined fields in one go. So all in all you loose a lot of abilities by dong this.

That being said you can still perform quite a few queries, i.e.:

  • User 1: Show all files where "Tom" is in "people" array
  • User 1: Show all files "created" between 2013/01/01 and 2013/02/01
  • User 1: Show all files having "license" "free" and "rating" greater 2
  • User 2: Show all files "published" in "2012" and tagged with "important"

All of those would still be possible with this schema.

As for which is better -RDBMS or NoSQL; it is difficult to say here, I would say both could be quite good, if done right, at querying this structure.

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Thanks for your answer. How would i determine the type (string, number, date) of a metadata field to display it right in the gui, e.g. a date picker? I think I need to store the type along with each entry, right? I'd like to hear more opinions on this, especially people prefering a relational solution. (So as by now, I would leave this question unanswered.) –  joafeldmann Mar 2 '13 at 14:37
    
@joafeldmann It depends on how you use it in your interface really, you might be required but more that you test the value of the field returned to see what it is. –  Sammaye Mar 2 '13 at 14:40
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