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Let's say that I have an array of 10 numbers whose absolute value range can go from 1 to 10. Values can be repeated. An example of this could be

{2, 4, 2, 6, 9, 10, 1, 7, 6, 3}. 

To each of these numbers we can assign a positive or negative sign, but there should be always 5 negative and 5 positive numbers in each combination, for example

{-2, -4, 2, -6, 9, 10, 1, 7, -6, -3}
{2, -4, -2, 6, -9, 10, -1, 7, -6, 3}

are possible permutation that follow this rule.

I would like to find, in all the possible permutations of half-positive and half-negative values of the given set, the minimum positive or negative sum whose value is closest to 0.

Any suggestions? I feel that the problem is computationally very intensive and I'm not sure there is a solution that is not a brute force one (for example enumerating all the permutations and then applying a variation of the 3Sum closest).

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Have you tried computing differences? Ie: Take the first number. Find the value with the lowest difference, and sum. Continue until finished. In the worst case, the Algorithm is O(n^2) complexity, which isn't exactly desirable but it's a starting point. –  christopher Mar 2 '13 at 13:37
    
I'll try that... –  roccapl Mar 2 '13 at 13:53
    
I'll post it as a potential answer. If this helps, then you can mark it as correct. –  christopher Mar 2 '13 at 13:54
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First sort the array, then put the biggest number into negative group and put Second-biggest into positive group. set a biggest number into positive group until sum of them is more than zero. Now set an other negative number.repeat it until you set 5 negative. This is greedy algorithm. Seems your problem is np-complete, it looks like AST problem but, size of your problem is limited to 10, so you can solve it by brute force search, you just have to check C(10,5)<10^5 possibilities and this number is small for today PCs.

Also if was able to choose different size of sets, your problem was same as subset sum problem which can be solve in pseudo-polynomial time See it :1 , 2.

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yes,i don't attended. –  amin k Mar 2 '13 at 14:46
    
I guess what you're trying to say is that, because of Cook's theorem and it's similarity with the Boolean satisfiability problem, this is a NP-Complete problem and so there are no solutions that could solve it in polynomial time. You're wrong about the homework, this is a small part of a puzzle I'm trying to design. Thanks. –  roccapl Mar 2 '13 at 14:51
    
If you only Want Closet to 0,You can sort array and (A1+A3+A5+A7+A9)-(A2+A4+A6+A8+A10) or -(A1+A3+A5+A7+A9)+(A2+A4+A6+A8+A10) is minimal ???? –  amin k Mar 2 '13 at 14:52
    
I don't think so. Take this set of numbers: {1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10}. If i compute (1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 9) - (2 + 2 + 3 + 7 + 10) the result is -5. But I know a case when the minimum sum is -1, for example ( - 1 + 2 + 2 - 2 + 3 - 3 + 4 - 7 - 9 + 10 ) sums to -1 –  roccapl Mar 2 '13 at 14:58
    
after sort.you set -A10(Biggest) then you try to fill this hole with +A9,.... and when fill it(sum of them > 0). You can set a new negative,Do it for 5 negative –  amin k Mar 2 '13 at 15:12
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Here's an example in Haskell that lists and compares all 126 possible combinations:

import Data.List
import Data.Ord

{-code by Will Ness-}
divide :: [a] -> [([a], [a])]
divide [] = [([],[])]
divide (x:xs) = go ([x],[],xs,1,length xs) where
  go (a,b,[],i,j) = [(a,b)]
  go (a,b, s@(x:xs),i,j) 
     | i>=j = [(a,b++s)]
     | i>0  = go (x:a, b, xs, i+1, j-1) ++ go (a, x:b, xs, i-1, j-1)
     | i==0 = go (x:a, b, xs,   1, j-1) ++ go (x:b, a, xs,   1, j-1)  

{-code by groovy-}       
minCombi list = 
  let groups = map (\x -> map (negate) (fst x) ++ snd x) (divide list)
      sums = zip (map (abs . sum) groups) groups
  in minimumBy (comparing fst) sums

*Main> minCombi [2, 4, 2, 6, 9, 10, 1, 7, 6, 3]
(0,[-7,-10,-2,-4,-2,1,9,6,6,3])

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thanks I don't know anything about the Haskell language, but I'll dig into that... –  roccapl Mar 2 '13 at 23:38
    
@roccapl thanks for the interesting challenge –  גלעד ברקן Mar 3 '13 at 0:29
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This is a java implementation of the algorithm described by amin k.

It's less cool than the Haskell implementation, I have no formal proof that it works in every case, but it seems to be working.

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Random;

public class TestPermutations {

int[] values = new int[10];
int[] positives = new int[5];
int[] negatives = new int[5];

public static void main(String... args) {
    new TestPermutations();
}

public TestPermutations() {
    Random ra = new Random();
    System.out.println("generating sequence...");
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        values[i] = (ra.nextInt(10) + 1);
        System.out.print(values[i] + " ");
    }
    Arrays.sort(values);

    int sum = 0;
    int positiveIndex = 0;
    int negativeIndex = 0;
    for (int i = values.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        if (i == values.length - 1) {
            negatives[negativeIndex] = - values[i];
            negativeIndex++;
            sum -= values[i];
        }
        else {
            if (sum <= 0) {
                if (positiveIndex < 5) {
                    positives[positiveIndex] = values[i];
                    positiveIndex++;
                    sum += values[i];
                }
                else {
                    negatives[negativeIndex] = - values[i];
                    negativeIndex++;
                    sum -= values[i];
                }
            }
            else {
                if (negativeIndex < 5) {
                    negatives[negativeIndex] = - values[i];
                    negativeIndex++;
                    sum -= values[i];
                }
                else {
                    positives[positiveIndex] = values[i];
                    positiveIndex++;
                    sum += values[i];
                }
            }
        }
    }

    System.out.print("\npositives ");
    for (int pos : positives) {
        System.out.print(pos + " ");
    }
    System.out.print("\nnegatives ");
    for (int neg : negatives) {
        System.out.print(neg + " ");
    }
    System.out.println("\nsum closest to 0: " + sum);
}
}
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Have you tried computing differences? Ie: Take the first number. Find the value with the lowest difference, and sum. Continue until finished. In the worst case, the Algorithm is O(n^2) complexity, which isn't exactly desirable but it's a starting point

share|improve this answer
    
this is a greedy approach which is not well suited for that problem, you'll settle on a local minimum (suboptimal solution) –  G_G Mar 2 '13 at 14:11
    
I was trying to follow your algorithm on paper but I'm not sure I've understood it fully. The best way to find the next number with the lowest difference is to sort the array in ascending order before the iteration. Then what exactly should I sum? The numbers? or the differences? –  roccapl Mar 2 '13 at 14:12
    
@G_G, perhaps you can provide a more efficient solution? Wait for G_G. No point going through mine, before you've seen a potentially better solution. –  christopher Mar 2 '13 at 14:20
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Welcome to the world of the NP-class problems!

You can compute the optimal solution by bruteforce or trying a relaxed approach (like the simplex algorithm) which will bring you the solution in polinomial time on the average-case complexity

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I assume you meant NP-complete. NP includes P. If NP != P, NP-complete means problems not in P. If you want to say it's NP-complete, you should motivate it. –  Dukeling Mar 2 '13 at 14:11
    
yeah, NP class aka NP complete. The problem is a variation of the well known knapsack problem. –  G_G Mar 2 '13 at 14:13
    
The NP class != NP-complete (look at the pictures on the right). It may be a variation of knapsack, but it isn't clearly, so you should say how it reduces to it. –  Dukeling Mar 2 '13 at 14:19
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