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I have a Project A that exports a static library as a target:

install(TARGETS alib DESTINATION lib EXPORT project_a-targets)
install(EXPORT project_a-targets DESTINATION lib/alib)

Now I want to use Project A as an external project from Project B and include its built targets:

ExternalProject_Add(project_a
  URL ...project_a.tar.gz
  PREFIX ${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/project_a
  CMAKE_ARGS -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX:PATH=<INSTALL_DIR>
)

include(${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/lib/project_a/project_a-targets.cmake)

The problem is that the include file does not exist yet when CMakeLists of Project B is run.

Is there a way to make the include dependent on the external project being built?

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2 Answers 2

I think you're mixing up two different paradigms here.

As you noted, the highly flexible ExternalProject module runs its commands at build time, so you can't make direct use of Project A's import file since it's only created once Project A has been installed.

If you want to include Project A's import file, you'll have to install Project A manually before invoking Project B's CMakeLists.txt - just like any other third-party dependency added this way or via find_file / find_library / find_package.

If you want to make use of ExternalProject_Add, you'll need to add something like the following to your CMakeLists.txt:

ExternalProject_Add(project_a
  URL ...project_a.tar.gz
  PREFIX ${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/project_a
  CMAKE_ARGS -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX:PATH=<INSTALL_DIR>
)

include(${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/lib/project_a/project_a-targets.cmake)

ExternalProject_Get_Property(project_a install_dir)
include_directories(${install_dir}/include)

add_dependencies(project_b_exe project_a)
target_link_libraries(project_b_exe ${install_dir}/lib/alib.lib)
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Thanks for your answer. What you suggest is similar to what I had before. I hoped to find a way to make use of the exported targets as it seemed like a nicer interface than specifying the lib paths manually... –  mirkokiefer Mar 2 '13 at 23:14
    
@mirkok In some ways I agree that it's a nicer interface. There are a couple of other options. You could for example just include the source of Project A in a subdirectory of Project B and pull it in via add_subdirectory. Or you could use ExternalProject_Add and do some trickery which causes CMake to run twice; the first time building the external project, the second time successfully picking up its import file "project_a-targets.cmake". –  Fraser Mar 3 '13 at 0:41
    
I wanted to avoid having to include the source of external projects in my source tree. It would be great if ExternalProject_Add just behaved like add_subdirectory and exposed all targets. The solution you described above is probably still the cleanest. –  mirkokiefer Mar 3 '13 at 1:47
    
Consider making them both ExternalProject builds, and then have B depend on A, and then the CMakeLists file for project B would include the targets file from project A, but your "Super Build" CMakeLists would just build A and then B, both as ExternalProjects... –  DLRdave Mar 7 '13 at 16:48
1  
@DLRdave - I've seen the Super Build solution recommended a few times, but I guess I'm not sure what benefits it provides over only including some external projects via ExternalProject. Is it consistency, or more canonical, or something else? I'm sure I'm missing something fundamental here. –  Fraser Mar 7 '13 at 19:46

You can also force the build of the dependent target in a secondary make process

See my answer on a related topic.

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