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Given this document class:

public class Tea
{
   public String Id { get; set; }

   public String Name { get; set; }

   public TeaType Type { get; set; }

   public Double WaterTemp { get; set; }

   public Int32 SleepTime { get; set; }
}

public enum TeaType
{
    Black,
    Green,
    Yellow,
    Oolong
}

I store a new Tea with the following code:

using (var ds = new DocumentStore { Url = "http://localhost:8080/" }.Initialize())
using (var session = ds.OpenSession("RavenDBFirstSteps"))
{
    Tea tea = new Tea() { Name = "Earl Grey", Type = TeaType.Black, WaterTemp = 99d, SleepTime = 3 };
    session.Store(tea);
    session.SaveChanges();
    Console.WriteLine(tea.Id);
}

The tea will be successfully saved, but when I try to query all black teas with linq, I am getting no results:

using (var ds = new DocumentStore { Url = "http://localhost:8080/" }.Initialize())
using (var session = ds.OpenSession("RavenDBFirstSteps"))
{
    var dbTeas = from teas in session.Query<Tea>()
                    where teas.Type == TeaType.Black
                    select teas;

    foreach (var dbTea in dbTeas)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(dbTea.Id + ": " + dbTea.Name);
    }
}

I also tried to save the Enum as Integer with the following command:

ds.Conventions.SaveEnumsAsIntegers = true;

But, the result is the same. All works when I use the Name or the WaterTemp. Does RavenDB supports Enums in this way or I am totally wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Shouldnt TeaType be an int? –  Colin Pear Mar 2 '13 at 14:47
    
@ColinPear From the C# point of view, the enum TeaType is internally an int. –  Kai Mar 2 '13 at 14:50
    
I see. I keep getting confused by the name of that prop –  Colin Pear Mar 2 '13 at 14:54
    
@ColinPear thank you for you answer. It was not the solution but I started thinking about the name of the prop :-) –  Kai Mar 2 '13 at 15:27
    
I believe you can still use Type if you like. You can do public TeaType @Type {get; set;} –  Colin Pear Mar 2 '13 at 15:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seemed that I got the answer. It is always not recommended to use properties with a name like Type, which can be a reserved keyword.

I renamed Type and everything works, so the answer is:

public class Tea
{
   public String Id { get; set; }

   public String Name { get; set; }

   public TeaType TeaType { get; set; }

   public Double WaterTemp { get; set; }

   public Int32 SleepTime { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Its renamed? I don't see where... –  Matt Johnson Mar 2 '13 at 16:10
    
@MattJohnson oh, sorry, I copied the wrong code. Now, it's correct one. –  Kai Mar 2 '13 at 16:13
    
Glad you got it working. :) –  Matt Johnson Mar 2 '13 at 16:25

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