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I have not found any clear benchmark about this subject so I made one. I will post it here in case anybody is looking for this like me.

I have one question though. Isn't SSE supposed to be 4 times faster than four fpu RSQRT in a loop? It is faster but a merely 1.5 times. Is moving to SSE registers having this much impact because I do not do a lot of calculations, but only rsqrt? Or is it because SSE rsqrt is much more precise, how do I find how many iterations sse rsqrt does? The two results:

4 align16 float[4] RSQRT: 87011us 2236.07 - 2236.07 - 2236.07 - 2236.07
4 SSE align16 float[4]  RSQRT: 60008us 2236.07 - 2236.07 - 2236.07 - 2236.07

Edit

Compiled using MSVC 11 /GS- /Gy /fp:fast /arch:SSE2 /Ox /Oy- /GL /Oi on AMD Athlon II X2 270

The test code:

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>
#include <th/thutility.h>

int main(void)
{
    float i;
    //long i;
    float res;
    __declspec(align(16)) float var[4] = {0};

    auto t1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    for(i = 0; i < 5000000; i+=1)
        res = sqrt(i);
    auto t2 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::cout << "1 float SQRT: " << std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::microseconds>(t2-t1).count() << "us " << res << std::endl;

    t1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    for(i = 0; i < 5000000; i+=1)
    {
         thutility::math::rsqrt(i, res);
         res *= i;
    }
    t2 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::cout << "1 float RSQRT: " << std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::microseconds>(t2-t1).count() << "us " << res << std::endl;

    t1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    for(i = 0; i < 5000000; i+=1)
    {
         thutility::math::rsqrt(i, var[0]);
         var[0] *= i;
    }
    t2 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::cout << "1 align16 float[4] RSQRT: " << std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::microseconds>(t2-t1).count() << "us " <<  var[0] << std::endl;

    t1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    for(i = 0; i < 5000000; i+=1)
    {
         thutility::math::rsqrt(i, var[0]);
         var[0] *= i;
         thutility::math::rsqrt(i, var[1]);
         var[1] *= i + 1;
         thutility::math::rsqrt(i, var[2]);
         var[2] *= i + 2;
    }
    t2 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::cout << "3 align16 float[4] RSQRT: "
        << std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::microseconds>(t2-t1).count() << "us " 
        << var[0] << " - " << var[1] << " - " << var[2] << std::endl;

    t1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    for(i = 0; i < 5000000; i+=1)
    {
         thutility::math::rsqrt(i, var[0]);
         var[0] *= i;
         thutility::math::rsqrt(i, var[1]);
         var[1] *= i + 1;
         thutility::math::rsqrt(i, var[2]);
         var[2] *= i + 2;
         thutility::math::rsqrt(i, var[3]);
         var[3] *= i + 3;
    }
    t2 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::cout << "4 align16 float[4] RSQRT: "
        << std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::microseconds>(t2-t1).count() << "us " 
        << var[0] << " - " << var[1] << " - " << var[2] << " - " << var[3] << std::endl;

    t1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    for(i = 0; i < 5000000; i+=1)
    {
        var[0] = i;
        __m128& cache = reinterpret_cast<__m128&>(var);
        __m128 mmsqrt = _mm_rsqrt_ss(cache);
        cache = _mm_mul_ss(cache, mmsqrt);
    }
    t2 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::cout << "1 SSE align16 float[4]  RSQRT: " << std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::microseconds>(t2-t1).count()
        << "us " << var[0] << std::endl;

    t1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    for(i = 0; i < 5000000; i+=1)
    {
        var[0] = i;
        var[1] = i + 1;
        var[2] = i + 2;
        var[3] = i + 3;
        __m128& cache = reinterpret_cast<__m128&>(var);
        __m128 mmsqrt = _mm_rsqrt_ps(cache);
        cache = _mm_mul_ps(cache, mmsqrt);
    }
    t2 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::cout << "4 SSE align16 float[4]  RSQRT: "
        << std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::microseconds>(t2-t1).count() << "us " << var[0] << " - "
        << var[1] << " - " << var[2] << " - " << var[3] << std::endl;

    system("PAUSE");
}

Results using float type:

1 float SQRT: 24996us 2236.07
1 float RSQRT: 28003us 2236.07
1 align16 float[4] RSQRT: 32004us 2236.07
3 align16 float[4] RSQRT: 51013us 2236.07 - 2236.07 - 5e+006
4 align16 float[4] RSQRT: 87011us 2236.07 - 2236.07 - 2236.07 - 2236.07
1 SSE align16 float[4]  RSQRT: 46999us 2236.07
4 SSE align16 float[4]  RSQRT: 60008us 2236.07 - 2236.07 - 2236.07 - 2236.07

My conclusion is not it is not worth bothering with SSE2 unless we make calculations on no less than 4 variables. (Maybe this applies to only rsqrt here but it is an expensive calculation (it also includes multiple multiplications) so it probably applies to other calculations too)

Also sqrt(x) is faster than x*rsqrt(x) with two iterations, and x*rsqrt(x) with one iteration is too inaccurate for distance calculation.

So the statements that I have seen on some boards that x*rsqrt(x) is faster than sqrt(x) is wrong. So it is not logical and does not worth the precision loss to use rsqrt instead of sqrt unless you directly need 1/x^(1/2).

Tried with no SSE2 flag (in case it applied SSE on normal rsqrt loop, it gave same results).

My RSQRT is a modified (same) version of quake rsqrt.

namespace thutility
{
    namespace math
    {
        void rsqrt(const float& number, float& res)
        {
              const float threehalfs = 1.5F;
              const float x2 = number * 0.5F;

              res = number;
              uint32_t& i = *reinterpret_cast<uint32_t *>(&res);    // evil floating point bit level hacking
              i  = 0x5f3759df - ( i >> 1 );                             // what the fuck?
              res = res * ( threehalfs - ( x2 * res * res ) );   // 1st iteration
              res = res * ( threehalfs - ( x2 * res * res ) );   // 2nd iteration, this can be removed
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Er, what are you trying to compare? I see square roots, and reciprocal square roots, and handcoded approximations and scalar SSE instructions and SIMD SSE instructions and standard library implementations. Which of them are you trying to compare to which, and which of the results are surprising to you? –  jalf Mar 2 '13 at 14:45
    
The surprising part for me was handcoded rsqrt approximation with 2 iterations 4 times in a loop. Isn't it supposed to be 4 times slower than SSE2? I have also noticed my SSE results are wrong. Why is that? –  Etherealone Mar 2 '13 at 14:50
    
It also looks like you're calling the scalar SSE instructions in every case (_mm_rsqrt_ss instead of _mm_rsqrt_ps). Am I missing something? –  jalf Mar 2 '13 at 14:51
    
If those are the ones you're concerned about, it would be nice if you provided a minimal sample, one which only generates the benchmarks that actually matter, with as little additional code as possible. :) –  jalf Mar 2 '13 at 14:52
    
@jalf I have just noticed that. Fixing in a minute. That was the problem for me I guess. My aim was to provide information for other people who wonder performances but it got too messed up :/ –  Etherealone Mar 2 '13 at 14:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's easy to get a lot of unnecessary overhead in SSE code.

If you want to ensure that your code is efficient, look at the compiler's disassembly. One thing that often kills performance (and it looks like it might affect you) is moving data between memory and SSE registers unnecessarily.

Inside your loop, you should keep all the relevant data, as well as the result, in SSE registers, rather than in a float[4].

As long as you're accessing memory, verify that the compiler generates an aligned move instruction to load the data into registers or to write it back to the array.

And check that the generated SSE instructions don't have a lot of unnecessary move instructions and other cruft in between them. Some compilers are pretty horrible at generating SSE code from intrinsics, so it pays to keep an eye on the code it generates.

Finally, you'll need to consult your CPU's manual/specifications to ensure that it actually executes the packed instructions that you use just as fast it does scalar instructions. (For modern CPUs I'd believe them to do so, but some older CPUs at least required a bit of additional time for packed instructions. Not four times as long as a scalar one, but enough that you couldn't reach a 4x speedup)

share|improve this answer
    
Is there an intrinsic to tell to keep the variable in a register or I have to write inline assembly for that? –  Etherealone Mar 2 '13 at 15:05
1  
@Tolga use variables of type __m128. It doesn't guarantee the variable will be kept in a register, but it's likely (using a float[4] makes it unlikely) –  harold Mar 2 '13 at 17:42
    
Yep, that. And don't cast them or put them in a union with a float[4] either. Don't let them alias anything else. Ideally, declare it as close to the use site as possible as well, and don't reuse it for other things afterwards. The smaller its scope, the easier it is for the compiler to determine that it doesn't alias anything and doesn't need to be written to memory. –  jalf Mar 2 '13 at 21:33

My conclusion is not it is not worth bothering with SSE2 unless we make calculations on no less than 4 variables. (Maybe this applies to only rsqrt here but it is an expensive calculation (it also includes multiple multiplications) so it probably applies to other calculations too)

Also sqrt(x) is faster than x*rsqrt(x) with two iterations, and x*rsqrt(x) with one iteration is too inaccurate for distance calculation.

So the statements that I have seen on some boards that x*rsqrt(x) is faster than sqrt(x) is wrong. So it is not logical and does not worth the precision loss to use rsqrt instead of sqrt unless you directly need 1/x^(1/2).

share|improve this answer
1  
What you've just discovered is that cargo-cult programming rarely works. Knowing that Carmack used a clever approximation 10 years ago, because CPUs at the time were deficient in certain areas does not magically make your code faster if you use the same trick today. :) –  jalf Mar 2 '13 at 21:30

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