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When the condition is true or false, how can I make it return back and ask the question again, making the user re-enter the value? Here is what I want to implement:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int n;
    cout<<"Enter numbers. Press 5 to stop: ";
    cin>>n;
    bool tr=true;
    while(tr)
    {
        if(n!=5)
            cout<<"You entered "<<n; //How to make it return again, since its false? I keep getting infinite loops :( ;
        else 
            tr=false;
    }
    return 0;
}
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4 Answers 4

You need to prompt the user in the while loop, so that it occurs in each iteration:

int n;
bool tr = true;
while(tr)
{
  cout << "Enter numbers. Press 5 to stop: ";
  cin >> n;
  if(n!=5) {
    cout << "You entered " << n;
  } else {
    tr = false;
  }
}
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1  
As an improvement, we could get rid of the useless boolean flag: while (true) { /*...*/ else break; } (I know you kept it to stick to the original code, this comment is more directed at the OP). –  syam Mar 2 '13 at 15:17
    
Thanks!! :D Alot! –  user1953285 Mar 2 '13 at 15:40
    
@syam I was actually adding that to my answer but got dragged away. Thanks! –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 2 '13 at 15:54

Just put all your code (except 'n' and 'tr' definition) in while loop as follow:

int main()
{
int n;
bool tr=true;
while(tr)
{
cout<<"Enter numbers. Press 5 to stop: ";
cin>>n;
    if(n!=5)
        cout<<"You entered "<<n;

    else 
        tr=false;
}
return 0;

}
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O_o!! I shall use these techniques from now on! –  user1953285 Mar 2 '13 at 15:41

The other answers all work, and there is something to be learned about improving program flow from them, but I believe the trick you're asking for is the continue keyword, which skips the remainder of this iteration of the loop.

bool tr = true;
int n;
while (tr)
{
    cout << "Enter numbers...";
    cin >> n;
    if (n != 5)
        continue;
    else
        tr = false;
}

EDIT Part 1: On the continue keyword.

You want to make your code as readable as possible. In this example, its use is unnecessary (as the other posters have shown); but it is the answer to the question "How do I skip the rest of processing in this iteration of my loop and continue to the next iteration?". Usually, such flow-breaking directives actually make code harder to read; but sometimes the opposite is true. Anything (or, at least, almost anything) that can be accomplished with continue or break, can be accomplished without them, so if you're going to use them, you want to have a definite reason for doing so. Usually, when I use continue, it's because I'm looping through a collection of inputs and I want to skip processing the loop whenever the input isn't in the format I'm expecting. Something like this (pseudo-code)...

foreach (Input i in ReceivedInputs)
{
    if (i.isBad())
    {
        cout << "Bad input";
        continue;
    }
    // Do massive block of calculating here.
}

is easier to read than this...

foreach (Input i in ReceivedInputs)
{
    if (i.isBad())
        cout << "Bad input";
    else
    {
        // Do massive block of calculating here.
    }
}

because the second version makes it harder to track what scope you're in, if you're looking toward the end of the massive block of calculating. In this case, I gain code readability by continue, so I use it. But simple code probably shouldn't use it. The break keyword is similar, though it's a lot easier to come up with examples where break is beneficial.

EDIT Part 2: On multiple iterations

This is just an issue of setting up the loop; there are no magic keywords here. The shortest way I can come up with, is probably something like this:

int n = 0;
int numberToTake = 10;

for ( int numbersTaken = 0; numbersTaken < numberToTake; ++numbersTaken)
{
    cout << "Enter numbers...";
    int n = 0;
    for (cin >> n; n != 5; cin >> n)
        cout << "Try again.";
    // Do whatever processing on n you want to do here.
}

Though I should point out that, doing it this way, the only value you will ever get from the user will be 5, and if he inputs anything that doesn't fit in an integer, you will get unexpected behavior.

EDIT 3: After reading the comment more thoroughly, I think you're just looking for is the more traditional use of the for loop.

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I always considered, reading from different C books, than the continue function is rarely used. So I did not want to use it either. But in those circumstances...Seems nice to use it. –  user1953285 Mar 2 '13 at 15:42
    
But can you tell me how to add iterations? Like, after 10 entries, the program automatically stops. –  user1953285 Mar 2 '13 at 15:47
    
see my edits for response –  kanders84152 Mar 2 '13 at 18:17
    
Thanks alot mate! –  user1953285 Mar 3 '13 at 7:16

No need for the exra bool variable.

The idiom can be: Infinitely loop until the user enters 5:

for(;;) {  // Loops infinitely
  cout << "Enter numbers. Press 5 to stop: ";
  cin >> n;
  if(n == 5)
    break;  // Exits the loop
  cout << "You entered " << n;  // Before the if if you want to print 5 as well
}
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:0 Wow!!! Ok... –  user1953285 Mar 2 '13 at 16:03

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