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I have a function called writeMessage. writeMessage calls an ajax request to get localized content. It also fades the message away after 'n' seconds once the content is returned from the ajax request. So it all works and I have tested with a number of calls, however, I feel it's overly complicated as I don't fully understand the scope of the variables when dealing with javascript closure statements. Can anyone please advise if I am jumping through too many hoops here to accomplish the below.

the function getTextResource takes parameters, (string, string, object, function)

  • the 'function' parameter is a callback that is called once the ajax request has completed.
  • the 'object' parameter is an arguments object containing all the details regarding how and where the message should be written.
  • the 'string' & 'string' parameters are being passed into the ajax request.

Within getTextResource I am calling an ajax method passing the 'object' parameter as the context along with the original default text and the callback function Once the ajax request is complete, via the context, I now call the callback function passing to it the results of the service call along with the arguments.

Do I need to keep passing the context along or is everything that is passed to getTextResoruce safe from being assigned a different value if the function is called again?

function writeMessage(args) {
    var d = $('<div></div>');

    getTextResource(args.resourceId, args.message, { args: args, messageElement: d },
        function (text, context) {
            var args = context.args;
            var d = context.messageElement;

            d.empty();
            d.append(text);

            args.element.append(d);

            if (args.fadeTimeOut > 0)
                setTimeout(function () {
                    d.fadeOut('slow', function () {
                        $(this).remove();
                    });
                }, args.fadeTimeOut);
        }
    );
}

var getTextResource = function (resourceId, defaultText, context, cb) {
    resourceId = resourceId + '';
    defaultText = defaultText + '';

    if (resourceId == '') resourceId = defaultText;
    if (defaultText == '') defaultText = resourceId;

    try{
        var request = $.ajax({
            type: 'GET',
            url: 'http://localhost/EaiCCM/api/' + BusinessScope.Version + '/' + BusinessScope.CampaignSegment + '/TextResource',//?' + qs,
            data:  {ResourceId: resourceId, DefaultText: defaultText},
            cache: false,
            dataType: 'json',
            contentType: 'application/json; charset=utf-8',
            context: { defaultText: defaultText, context: context, cb: cb }
        });

        request.done(function (result) {
            var txt = this.defaultText;
            try {
                if ($.isPlainObject(result))
                    txt = result.Detail;
            }
            catch (e) {
            }
            finally {
                if (typeof this.cb == 'function')
                    this.cb(txt, this.context);
            }
        });

        request.fail(function (jqXHR, textStatus, context) {
            if (typeof this.cb == 'function')
                this.cb(this.defaultText, this.context);
        });
    }
    catch (e) {
        if (typeof cb == 'function')
            cb(defaultText, context);
    }
};
share|improve this question
    
What is exactly the problem ? With asynchronous method, may be you need to bind the actual scope of this to your function. Something like this: this.boundCB = this.cb.bind(this); this.cb(...); –  Gwennael Buchet Mar 2 '13 at 17:07
    
i don't necessarily have a problem; the code is working. My concern is that it's overly complicated. I think Stuart hit the mark by explaining the variables are scoped to the function so I don't need to keep passing the "context" along. –  user1949561 Mar 2 '13 at 18:02
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

No, you don't need the context objects for the callbacks if you're constructing it in the scope of writeMessage. (The scope is local to each call of the function.)

This:

    function (text, context) {
        var args = context.args;
        var d = context.messageElement;

Could just as easily be:

    function (text) {

And request.done can read:

    request.done(function (result) {
        var txt = defaultText;
        try {
            if ($.isPlainObject(result))
                txt = result.Detail;
        }
        catch (e) {
        }
        finally {
            if (typeof cb == 'function')
                cb(txt);
        }
    });

Arguments are scoped to each call of the function they're an argument to. var variables are scoped to calls of the first function above the var statement. The scope only persists until the brace that closes that function.

So, in this code:

function writeMessage(args) {
  var d = $('<div></div>');
  var rid = args.resourceId;

  var cb = function (text) {
    var exampleVar = text.toUpper();
    d.textContent = exampleVar + rid;
  }

  getTextResource(rid+'-san', 'foo', cb)
  getTextResource(rid+'-chan', 'bar', cb)
}

function getTextResource(resourceId,defaultText,cb) {
  // for simplicity's sake let's just simulate a default scenario

  // Note that the `resourceId` passed to `getTextResource`
    // is in no way passed to the callback here

  cb(defaultText);
}
  • args, rid, and d are local to each call of writeMessage.
  • text and exampleVar are local to each call of the callback cb.
  • resourceId and defaultText are local to each call of getTextResource.
  • cb is the callback we construct in writeMessage, and the callback we pass in in getTextResource. Although they have the same name, the different scopes mean they're effectively to be treated as two different variables. (If this is confusing, see the analogy below.)
  • When getTextResource calls the callback with 'bar', it will modify the same d as when it calls the callback for 'foo', because the d used in the callback is local to the writeMessage in which it was constructed.
  • The value of exampleVar that the textContent of d is set to will be different across each call, though, because it's local to the callback.
  • The value of exampleVar will not end with an additional '-san' or '-chan', because they are appended to the resourceId in the scope of getTextResource, which is in no way visible to the scope of writeMessage (where the variable is called rid and not resourceId anyway).

An analogy for variables with the same name in different scopes

Variable names refer to different values in different contexts, like how "Bob" means a different person in Bob's Burgers than it does in Bob the Builder. However, it's possible for the "Bob" in one context to refer to something that was also called "Bob" in its original context, like in the first episode of Archer season 4 where Sterling is called "Bob" and works at "Bob's Burgers" (as a reference to H. Jon Benjamin providing the voice for both characters). You could claim it's a coincidence and the "real" Bob's Burgers "Bob" exists somewhere else in the world of Archer, but whether or not he's the same "Bob" across the two contexts is irrelevant to him being the same "Bob" from one scene in Archer to the next.

share|improve this answer
    
Amazing. So it's pretty much "thread safe". If getTextResrouce gets called on a thread (say from a setTimeout), since the variables are scoped to the function I'm safe. If that's the case I wrote all my JS way too complicated! :( –  user1949561 Mar 2 '13 at 17:33
    
WOW! That was extremely well written and explained post! Kudos, I really appreciate and respect your ability to have understood my question and clearly convey how it works. Totally get it now xD, TY –  user1949561 Mar 2 '13 at 18:27
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