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I manage a computer lab with 40 ubuntu machines and I have cobbled together this command to find the total disk usage of files larger than 100M in the students' home directories:

for i in `cat ./lab-machines.txt ` ; do ssh $i "nohup find /home -size +100M -print0 | du --files0-from=- -ch | tail -1 && hostname && ls /home" ; done > lab-disk-usage.txt

The file "lab-machines.txt" contains the hostnames of the computers on a separate line each. The command runs from a server that has been configured with password-less logins into the lab machines for the root user. The output in the file lab-disk-usage.txt contains something like this for every machine (I've inserted comments in parenthesis):

69G total    
hostname
student-username (changes)
admin-username (always the same)
lost+found (always the same)

I would like the output to look like this for each machine:

69G hostname student-username

I am not familiar enough with text filtering to get this done in time. Can you help?

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5 Answers 5

try this:

awk -vORS=" " 'NR==1{sub("total","")}NR<=3' file
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This seems to miss the last record in a multiple-record file. –  ghoti Mar 3 '13 at 14:31

Pipe Output Through tr Command

You might try a simpler solution, such as piping your output through the tr command. For example:

tr -s "\n" ' ' < lab-disk-usage.txt

This assumes there's only one record in the file, though. If you plan on having multiple records, you'll want to filter each record through the tr pipeline first before appending it to the output file. For example:

your_pipeline_commands | tr -s "\n" ' ' > lab-disk-usage.txt

Use Perl's Flip-Flop Operator

If you have a set of multi-line records, you'll need to be more clever. Perl offers some advantages over AWK for handling multi-line records, including the flip-flop operator. For example:

perl -ne 'if ( /total/../^lost/ ) {
              chomp $_; print $_ . " "
          } else {
              print "\n"
          };
          END { print "\n" };' lab-disk-usage.txt

Depending on your actual corpus, you may need to tweak the regular expression a bit to get things working right, but on my system it does the right thing.

Corpus for Testing Perl

69G total
hostname
student-username
admin-username
lost+found

69G total
hostname
student-username
admin-username
lost+found

Sample Output from Perl

69G total     hostname student-username admin-username lost+found 
69G total     hostname student-username admin-username lost+found 
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1  
As an aside, there is an awk alternative for the "flip-flop operator" and that is a pattern range ( /total/,/^lost/{ } ). –  Scrutinizer Mar 2 '13 at 19:50
    
@Scrutinizer Thanks for pointing out GNU awk's pattern ranges. Awk is certainly more elegant when you can rely on blank lines as record separators, e.g. awk -v RS='' '/total/,/^lost/ { gsub(/\n/, " ", $0); print }' lab-disk-usage.txt, although Perl's -00 paragraph mode performs a similar function. –  CodeGnome Mar 2 '13 at 20:46

I've slightly modified your example data:

69G total    
host1
jane
admin-username
lost+found
65G total    
host2
albert
admin-username
lost+found

This can get turned into a table:

[ghoti@pc ~/tmp]$ awk 'NR%5==1{size=$1} NR%5==2{host=$1} NR%5==3{user=$1; printf("%-8s%-16s%s\n", size, host, user)}' lab-disk-usage.txt
69G     host1           jane
65G     host2           albert

The essential thing her is that we're using a modulo operator (NR%5) to figure out where we are in each set of five lines.

If you can't rely on five lines per set, then please clarify how your input data is structured. There are other ways we can detect record boundaries, like looking for /[0-9]+G total$/, if NR%5 can't be used:

[ghoti@pc ~/tmp]$ awk '/G total$/{size=$1; getline host; getline user; printf("%-8s%-16s%s\n", size, host, user)}' lab-disk-usage.txt 
69G     host1           jane
65G     host2           albert

This is basically just an awk version of potong's GNU sed suggestion, which could also be made portable (i.e. not just GNU sed) as:

[ghoti@pc ~/tmp]$ sed -ne '/G total/{s/ .*//;N;N;s/\n/  /g;p;}' lab-disk-usage.txt 
69G  host1  jane
65G  host2  albert
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -nr '/ total/{N;N;s/( total\s*)?\n/ /gp}' file
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If there are no empty lines between the records you could introduce one first:

awk '/total/{print x}1' | awk '{print $1,$3,$4}' RS= OFS='\t' 

With file contents:

69G total    
host1
jane
admin-username
lost+found
65G total    
host2
albert
admin-username
lost+found

This produces:

69G host1   jane
65G host2   albert

If there already is an empty line between the records you could skip the part before the pipe and use:

awk '{print $1,$3,$4}' RS= OFS='\t' file
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