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In Haskell code from Real World Haskell, Chapter 24, an example of using MapReduce to count the number of LINES in a file is implemented as follows:

import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8 as LB
lineCount :: [LB.ByteString] -> Int64
lineCount = mapReduce rdeepseq (LB.count '\n')
                      rdeepseq sum

It's clear to me that this is counting the number of newline characters. If I wanted to count the number of a's, I do:

import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8 as LB
lineCount :: [LB.ByteString] -> Int64
lineCount = mapReduce rdeepseq (LB.count 'a')
                      rdeepseq sum

I've tried this, and it works. How do I modify this code to count the number of characters (ie total number of characters present? Is there some sort of regular expression framework I can use?

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Use LB.length instead of count. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 2 '13 at 17:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's clear to me that this is counting the number of newline characters.

Well, not really. A ByteString is a string of bytes. (If you want a string of characters, you should use Text from either Data.Text or Data.Text.Lazy, in the text package.)

Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8 exports an interface that lets you pretend you're working with characters, but it assumes one character = one byte, à la ISO-8859-1 or ASCII. Unicode it ain't.

How do I modify this code to count the number of characters (ie total number of characters present?

LB.count :: Char -> ByteString -> Int64, so we're looking for a function of type ByteString -> Int64. That function is LB.length.

lineCount = mapReduce rdeepseq LB.length
                      rdeepseq sum

Is there some sort of regular expression framework I can use?

It's easy enough to use full-blown parsers in Haskell that we (well, I at least) use parsers instead of regular expressions. If your data is in the form of a ByteString (or a Text, for that matter) I'd recommend using attoparsec.

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That worked, thanks! –  Velvet Ghost Mar 2 '13 at 17:54

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