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Following the question: How come an array's address is equal to its value in C?

#include <stdio.h>
#define N 10    
char str2[N]={"Hello"};
int main(){
    printf("sizeof(str2): %d bytes\n", sizeof(str2));
    printf("sizeof(&str2): %d bytes\n", sizeof(&str2));
    return 0;
}

Output:

sizeof(str2): 10 bytes
sizeof(&str2): 4 bytes

I know that str2 alone is the adress of the first element in array str2. And that when str2 is an argument of sizeof it returns the size of the whole array str2.

In addition, &str2 is also the adress of the first element in arr str2 but from diffrent type (char (*)[N] == pointer to array). But how &str2 behaves when it's an argument of sizeof?

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1  
lol. I meant "I know that" from the link.. –  user1980750 Mar 2 '13 at 17:40
3  
"I know that str2 alone is the adress of the first element in array str2" - well, it isn't. It is converted to a pointer to its first element in most contexts, but sizeof is one of the exceptions. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 2 '13 at 19:01
    
@DanielFischer so why printf("%p %p",str2, str2+1); prints the adress of the first and second element respectively? –  user1980750 Mar 2 '13 at 20:43
2  
@user1980750 Because that is not one of the exceptions. Unless it is the operand of sizeof, _Alignof or the address operator &, or, in the case of string literals, as an initializer for a char[], an expression of array type is converted to a pointer to the array's first element. So in most contexts, the name of an array evaluates to a pointer to its first element, but it is something different (the name of an array). –  Daniel Fischer Mar 2 '13 at 20:53
    
read updated answer –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 8 '13 at 19:01
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

&str2 is a pointer. So you're just seeing the sizeof a pointer on your platform.

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It is not necessarily the case that all pointer types are the same size, though it's true for most implementations. –  Keith Thompson Aug 29 '13 at 15:04
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Difference between &str and str, when str is declared as char str[10]?

Read sizeof Operator:

6.5.3.4 The sizeof operator, 1125:
When you apply the sizeof operator to an array type, the result is the total number of bytes in the array.

So, according to your declaration, sizeof(str2) gives the complete array size that is 10 bytes (because N is defined 10, and char size is 1-byte).
Whereas in expression sizeof(&str2), &str2 is address of array and size of address that is 4 bytes in your system. (address size may 8 byte in some systems e.g 64-bit).

In addition, &str2 is also the adress of the first element in arr str2?

No, values-wise both &str2 and str are same, but semantically both are different. One is address of an array of 10 chars while the other is is an address of a char.

One difference you have seen in your own example that how they are differences(and @ouah explained in this answer).

  • type of str is char[10]
  • type of &str is char(*)[10]

Second: Following diagram will help you to observe the other difference.

for declaration: 
#define N 10
char str2[N] = {"Hello"};

str2 Array in memory is something like:
----------------------------------------

str
+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----++----+
|'H' |'e' |'l' |'l' |'o' |'\0'|'\0'|'\0'|'\0'|'\0'|| '@'|
+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----++----+
 201   202  203 204  205   206  207  208  209  210   211
▲ ▲     ▲                                             ▲
| |     |                                             |
|(str2) (str2 + 1)                                    | 
|                                                     |
|-----------------------------------------------------|
|201                                                  | 
|                                                     |
|                                                     |
(&str2) = 201                           (&str2 + 1) = 211


* assuming str address start from 201
* str[N] is 10 char long 201-210, partially initialized
* at uninitialized position, str2[i] = '\0'
* location 211 is unallocated, having garbage value,
  access to this location is illegal-Undefined Behavior

For above diagram you can write a code:

#include <stdio.h>
#define N 10    
int main(){
   char str2[N]={"Hello"};

   printf("\n %p, %p\n",str2, str2+1);
   printf("\n %p, %p\n",(&str2), (&str2+1));
}  

Output:

 0xbf67e142, 0xbf67e143

 0xbf67e142, 0xbf67e14c

A link for codepad:

Notice the first line output address difference is one byte, But in second line difference is 10 bytes because its array's pointer (as shown above in diagram).

According to pointer mathematics rules when you add 1 to pointer variable it start points to next element of its own type that is the reason 10 byte differences because &str2 is array address..

Third difference:

By doing *str2 you can access first element. Whereas *(&str2) will not give you first element but it is address of first element.

An example will help here:

#include <stdio.h>
#define N 10    
int main(){
   char str2[N]={"Hello"};
   printf("\n%p %c, %p %c\n",str2, *(str2), *(&str2), **(&str2));
}  

output:

0xbf587046 H, 0xbf587046 H

Codepad link

In output

str2 gives  0xbf587046 
*(str2)     H 
*(&str2)    0xbf587046 
**(&str2)   H 

That means *(&str2) == str2 and value is address. And hence *(str2) = **(&str2) values is H.

Edit: Above I shown difference between &str and str where str is an array of type char[10].

Difference between char *str and char str[] and how both are stored in memory

Suppose we have two declarations like below:

char *str1 = "hello";   
char str2[] = "hello";  

In above declarations str1 is a pointer to char, that points to a constant string literal (by holding address of first char h in "hello" string).

A string in C is of char[N] (array) type that is why sizeof("hello") gives 6 because "hello" string is 6 chars long array (included \0 nul, strings termination, type of hello is char[6]).

In memory you "hello" string is stored like as below:

 str1         23   24   25   26   27   28
+----+      +----+----+----+----+----+----+
| 23 |      | h  | e  |  l | l  | o  | \0 |    
+----+      +----+----+----+----+----+----+
   +-----------▲

here address of hello string is first address = 23.  
str1: is pointer capable to store address. 
"hello" consists of 6 chars

char* str1 = "hello"; basically stores address of string hello to pointer variable str1 as I shown above in figure.

Note: If you wants lately in you code you change change str1 to point some other string. But you can't modify hello string. for example following code is valid:

 char* str1 = "hello";  // str1 points to hello  str1-->"hello"
 str1 = "world";  //Now, str1 points to world  str1-->"world"

Now str1 points to other constant string world.

 str1         93   94   95   96   97   98 
+----+      +----+----+----+----+----+----+
| 93 |      | w  | o  |  r | l  | d  | \0 |    
+----+      +----+----+----+----+----+----+
   +-----------▲

here address of world string is first address = 93.  
str1: value change to point string world. 

Important to note: str1 points to constant strings hence you can't modify string by accessing/indexing memory location for example str1[i] = 'A'; will be illegal because you are writing on read only memory and behaviors of this is Undefined at runtime (although no compilation error because syntactically its correct).

Again because str1 is a pointer sizeof(str1) will give 4 on same machine.

My following code and its run:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
   char* str1="Hello";
   printf("\nstr1: %s, address: %p, sizeof(str1): %u", str1, str1, sizeof(str1));
   str1 = "world";
   printf("\nstr1: %s, address: %p, sizeof(str1): %u", str1, str1, sizeof(str1));
   return 1;
}  

Output:

str1: Hello, address: 0x80485e8, sizeof(str1): 4
str1: world, address: 0x8048619, sizeof(str1): 4

Codepad link

So, to assign new string I simply assign address of new string. But I can't call strcpy() that will try to write on read only memory location and that is illegal.

In second declaration char str2[] = "hello";, str2[] is an \0 terminated array of chars (or string) but NOT pointer. Notice because in this declaration size is not given default size will we that size of constant string "hello" that is 6. Type of str2 is char[6].

When we do char str2[] = "hello"; an array of char created and hello string will be copied into that array So str2 is not simply pointer but an array storing complete string.

Its conceptually in like.

       str2:
       103  104  105  106  107  108
      +----+----+----+----+----+----+
      | h  | e  |  l | l  | o  | \0 |    
      +----+----+----+----+----+----+

And in this case lately in your code you are not allow to do str2[] = "world"; or str2 = "world" infect it will be compilation time error.

Example Code:

#include<stdio.h>
int main(){
 char str2[] = "hello";
 str2[] = "world";
 str2 = "world"; 
 return 1; 
}

Compilation errors:

In function 'main':
Line 4: error: expected expression before ']' token
Line 5: error: incompatible types in assignment

Codescape link

Where this array str2 is not constant, we can modify its content for example doing str2[2] = 'A' is perfectly valid. We can also call strcpy to change content (and address space will not change)

       strcpy(str2, "world");

       str2:
       103  104  105  106  107  108
      +----+----+----+----+----+----+
      | w  | o  |  r | l  | d  | \0 |    
      +----+----+----+----+----+----+

      Note world coped into same memory space, address of world and hello
      string is name. 

Code Example:

#include<stdio.h>
int main(){
 char str2[] = "hello";
 printf("\nstr2: %s, address: %p, sizeof(str2): %u", str2, str2, sizeof(str2));
 str2[2] = 'A';
 printf("\nstr2: %s, address: %p, sizeof(str2): %u", str2, str2, sizeof(str2));
 strcpy(str2, "world");
 printf("\nstr2: %s, address: %p, sizeof(str2): %u", str2, str2, sizeof(str2));
 return 1; 
}

Output:

str2: hello, address: 0xbf58d056, sizeof(str2): 6
str2: heAlo, address: 0xbf58d056, sizeof(str2): 6
str2: world, address: 0xbf58d056, sizeof(str2): 6

Codepad link

Note: string values are different on same address space. sizeof(str2) = 6 perfectly understood from older answer that is size of array in bytes.

To read similar description about 2-Dimensional array read: Difference between char* str[] and char str[][] and how both stores in memory?

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good explanation...bookmarked !!! –  noufal Sep 1 '13 at 16:53
    
+1 Great answer.(I wish I could give a +10) ;) –  undefined is not a function Sep 10 '13 at 20:24
    
@AlanHaggaiAlavi Hi Do you know Dr. Vinod P. SCMS Engg. ernakulam? Is it your web: thoughtripples.com –  Grijesh Chauhan Feb 21 at 18:21
    
Grijesh Chauhan: Hello! Yes, Dr. Vinod is a good friend of mine and a great person! :-) He called an hour back and told me about you as well. Yes, Thought Ripples is a company founded by my friends and myself. :-) –  Alan Haggai Alavi Feb 22 at 15:54
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str2 is of type char [10] (i.e, array 10 ofchar`)

&str2 is of type char (*)[10] (i.e., pointer to an array 10 of char).

So sizeof (&str2) yields the size of an objet of pointer type char (*)[10]

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