Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This seems like it shouldn't compile and run as Object does not have a fail() method. At compile time is something funky happening? (I am using NetBeans):

import static org.junit.Assert.*;
import org.junit.Test;

public class Test {

    @Test
    public void hello() {
        fail();

    }
}

Regards,

Guido

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Your import static line imports all static members of the Assert class into the static namespace of your compilation unit. The fail() call refers to Assert.fail().

The confusion you are experiencing regarding where fail() is defined is precisely why I don't usually recommend using import static. In my own code, I usually import the class and use it to invoke the static methods:

import org.junit.Assert;
import org.junit.Test;

public class Test {

    @Test
    public void hello() {
        Assert.fail();
    }
}

Much more readable.

However, as JB Nizet points out, it is fairly common practice to use import static for JUnit's assertions; when you write and read enough JUnit tests, knowing where the assertion methods come from will become second nature.

share|improve this answer
    
What's the better way to do this? (This was the default NetBeans way to do it). –  Guido Anselmi Mar 2 '13 at 17:56
2  
You can remove the static import, and call Assert.fail(). I agree that static imports shouldn't be abused, but statically importing Assert.* in a JUnit test is a generally accepted practice. –  JB Nizet Mar 2 '13 at 17:57
    
@JBNizet: I guess it really depends on the individual case. In this case, since most methods here begin with assert, the Assert. prefix is redundant most of the time. But if the class were designed without the method beginning with "assert" (i.e., assert methods are just true(), false(), notNull(), etc.), then having the class prefix makes a huge difference in readability. –  Platinum Azure Mar 2 '13 at 17:59
    
@JBNizet: Thanks - I agree that calling the static method is far more readable. –  Guido Anselmi Mar 2 '13 at 18:02
1  
IMO, what makes it acceptable is that a JUnit Test usually doesn't extend any class, and have methods which usually don't call each other. So any method called without any class or object prefix is "obviously" a statically imported one, from JUnit's Assert class or from Mockito or your preferred mocking framework. And not repeating Assert and Mockito everywhere makes the code easier to write and read. –  JB Nizet Mar 2 '13 at 18:04

This is perfectly correct and it will run and compile - I already checked using eclipse. The reason is the static import:

import static org.junit.Assert.*;

that adds all the static fields or methods from the org.junit.Assert class - hence including fail() method.

Nevertheless a problem that might occur is the fact that the name of your test class is the same as the name of the annotation

@Test

hence it will generate an error:

The import org.junit.Test conflicts with a type defined in the same file

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for pointing out the ancillary issue with the class name. Not directly relevant, but it might help someone learn something :-) –  Platinum Azure Mar 2 '13 at 18:03

This error is coming because your classname and annotation name are same(Test).Change your class name to 'Test1' or other than Test.

share|improve this answer
    
The question was "Why does this compile", not "Why do I get this error". It was a question about mass imports. –  Andrew Stubbs Jul 18 at 9:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.