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I've been playing around with the Android SDK, and I am a little unclear on saving an application's state. So given this minor re-tooling of the 'Hello, Android' example:

package com.android.hello;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.widget.TextView;

public class HelloAndroid extends Activity {
    /** Called when the activity is first created. */
    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

        mTextView = new TextView(this);

        if (savedInstanceState == null) {
            mTextView.setText("Welcome to HelloAndroid!");
        } else {
            mTextView.setText("Welcome back.");
        }

        setContentView(mTextView);
    }

    private TextView mTextView = null;
}

I thought that might be all one needed to do for the simplest case, but it always gives me the first message, no matter how I navigate away from the app. I'm sure it's probably something simple like overriding onPause or something like that, but I've been poking away in the docs for 30 minutes or so and haven't found anything obvious, so would appreciate any help.

Cue me looking a fool in three, two, one...

share|improve this question
    
When is savedInstanceState == null and when is it not null ? –  Trojan.ZBOT Dec 29 '13 at 0:50
10  
You're explicitly destroying your activity by - as you said, navigating away from it, such as by pressing back. Actually, the scenario in which this 'savedInstanceState' is used, is when Android destroys your activity for recreation. For intance: If you change the language of your phone while the activity was running (and so different resources from your project need to be loaded). Another very common scenario is when you rotate your phone to the side so that the activity is recreated and displayed in landscape. –  villoren Jan 3 at 19:51
3  
To get the second message, enable "Don't keep activities" in dev options. Press a home button and get back from recents. –  Doctoror Drive Feb 7 at 18:34
    
@DoctororDrive really great tip for testing this scenario! –  DiscDev Jul 7 at 19:35

15 Answers 15

up vote 1182 down vote accepted

You need to override onSaveInstanceState(Bundle savedInstanceState) and write the application state values you want to change to the Bundle parameter like this:

@Override
public void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
  super.onSaveInstanceState(savedInstanceState);
  // Save UI state changes to the savedInstanceState.
  // This bundle will be passed to onCreate if the process is
  // killed and restarted.
  savedInstanceState.putBoolean("MyBoolean", true);
  savedInstanceState.putDouble("myDouble", 1.9);
  savedInstanceState.putInt("MyInt", 1);
  savedInstanceState.putString("MyString", "Welcome back to Android");
  // etc.
}

The Bundle is essentially a way of storing a NVP ("Name-Value Pair") map, and it will get passed in to onCreate() and also onRestoreInstanceState() where you'd extract the values like this:

@Override
public void onRestoreInstanceState(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
  super.onRestoreInstanceState(savedInstanceState);
  // Restore UI state from the savedInstanceState.
  // This bundle has also been passed to onCreate.
  boolean myBoolean = savedInstanceState.getBoolean("MyBoolean");
  double myDouble = savedInstanceState.getDouble("myDouble");
  int myInt = savedInstanceState.getInt("MyInt");
  String myString = savedInstanceState.getString("MyString");
}

You would usually use this technique to store instance values for your application (selections, unsaved text, etc.).

share|improve this answer
10  
Any chance this works on the phone, but not in the emulator? I cannot seem to get a non-null savedInstanceState. –  Adam Jack Nov 18 '09 at 22:39
4  
I have an ArrayList of points how to save all points in this array list and then restore them? –  AZ_ Nov 29 '10 at 7:09
302  
CAREFUL: you need to call super.onSaveInstanceState(savedInstanceState) before adding your values to the Bundle, or they will get wiped out on that call (Droid X Android 2.2). –  jkschneider Apr 13 '11 at 18:59
2  
Im having some trouble with this on a stock X8. OnSaveInstanceState is NEVER called. Not when going back to home screen, nor when pressing back button to get to the previous activity and neither in the case of quitting the app. On destroyed is called, but not onSaveInstance state. –  Andras Balázs Lajtha Feb 27 '12 at 10:38
47  
Careful: the official documentation states, that you should save important information within the onPause-Method because the onsaveinstance-method is not part of the android lifecycle. developer.android.com/reference/android/app/Activity.html –  schlingel Jun 19 '12 at 7:40

The savedInstanceState is only for saving state associated with a current instance of an Activity, for example current navigation or selection info, so that if Android destroys and recreates an Activity, it can come back as it was before. See the documentation for onCreate and onSaveInstanceState

For more long lived state, consider using a SQLite database, a file, or preferences. See Saving Persistent State.

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64  
+1 onSaveInstanceState is only for transient state. You should save permanent changes in the onPause method. –  Dave Webb Jan 12 '10 at 6:42
    
When is savedInstanceState == null and when is it not null ? –  Trojan.ZBOT Dec 29 '13 at 22:20
    
savedInstanceState is null when the system is creating a new instance of your Activity and not null when it's restoring. –  Gabriel Câmara Jan 15 at 13:21

Note that it is NOT safe to use onSaveInstanceState and onRestoreInstanceState, according to the documentation on Activity states in http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/Activity.html.

The document states (in the 'Activity Lifecycle' section):

Note that it is important to save persistent data in onPause() instead of onSaveInstanceState(Bundle) because the later is not part of the lifecycle callbacks, so will not be called in every situation as described in its documentation.

In other words, put your save/restore code in onPause() and onResume() instead!

share|improve this answer
29  
Just to nitpick: it's not unsafe either. This just depends on what you want to preserve and for how long, which @Bernard isn't entirely clear on in his original question. InstanceState is perfect for preserving the current UI state (data entered into controls, current positions in lists and so forth), whereas Pause/Resume is the only possibility for long term persistent storage. –  Pontus Gagge Jun 24 '10 at 14:01
22  
This should be downvoted. It's not safe to use on(Save|Restore)InstanceState like lifecycle methods (i.e. do anything else in them than save / restore the state). They're perfectly good for saving / restoring state. Also, how do you want to save / restore state in onPause and onResume? You don't get Bundles in those methods that you can use, so you'd have to employ some other state-saving, in databases, files, etc. which is stupid. –  Felix Jul 11 '10 at 10:10
90  
We should not down vote this person at least he made efforts to go through the documentation and I think we people are here for actually building a knowledgeable community and help each other not to DOWN VOTE. so 1 vote up for the effort and I'll request you people not to down vote rather vote up or don't vote.... this person clear the confusion that one would like to have when going through documentation. 1 vote up :) –  AZ_ Nov 26 '10 at 5:13
13  
I dont think this answer deserves a downvote. Atleast he made an effort to answer and had quoted a section from doco. –  GSree Jan 5 '11 at 4:54
16  
This answer is absolutely correct and deserves UP vote, not down! Let me clarify difference between states for those guys who don't see it. A GUI state, like selected radio-buttons and some text in the input field, is much less important than the data state, like records added to a list displayed in a ListView. The latter must be stored to the database in onPause because it's the only guarantied call. If you put it in onSaveInstanceState instead, you risk loosing data if that is not called. But if the radio-button selection is not saved for the same reason - it's not a big deal. –  JBM Jun 16 '11 at 15:15

My colleague wrote an article explaining Application State on Android devices including explanations on Activity Lifecycle and State Information, How to Store State Information, and saving to State Bundle and SharedPreferences and take a look at here.

The article covers three approaches:

Store local varible/UI control data for application lifetime (ie temporarily) using Instance State Bundle

[Code sample – Store State in State Bundle]
@Override
public void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle savedInstanceState) 
{
  // Store UI state to the savedInstanceState.
  // This bundle will be passed to onCreate on next call.  EditText txtName = (EditText)findViewById(R.id.txtName);
  String strName = txtName.getText().toString();

  EditText txtEmail = (EditText)findViewById(R.id.txtEmail);
  String strEmail = txtEmail.getText().toString();

  CheckBox chkTandC = (CheckBox)findViewById(R.id.chkTandC);
  boolean blnTandC = chkTandC.isChecked();

  savedInstanceState.putString(“Name”, strName);
  savedInstanceState.putString(“Email”, strEmail);
  savedInstanceState.putBoolean(“TandC”, blnTandC);

  super.onSaveInstanceState(savedInstanceState);
}

Store local varible/UI control data between application instances (ie permanently) using Shared Preferences

[Code sample – Store State in SharedPreferences]
@Override
protected void onPause() 
{
  super.onPause();

  // Store values between instances here
  SharedPreferences preferences = getPreferences(MODE_PRIVATE);
  SharedPreferences.Editor editor = preferences.edit();  // Put the values from the UI
  EditText txtName = (EditText)findViewById(R.id.txtName);
  String strName = txtName.getText().toString();

  EditText txtEmail = (EditText)findViewById(R.id.txtEmail);
  String strEmail = txtEmail.getText().toString();

  CheckBox chkTandC = (CheckBox)findViewById(R.id.chkTandC);
  boolean blnTandC = chkTandC.isChecked();

  editor.putString(“Name”, strName); // value to store
  editor.putString(“Email”, strEmail); // value to store
  editor.putBoolean(“TandC”, blnTandC); // value to store    
  // Commit to storage
  editor.commit();
}

Keeping object instances alive in memory between activities within application lifetime using Retained Non-Configuration Instance

[Code sample – store object instance]
private cMyClassType moInstanceOfAClass;// Store the instance of an object
@Override
public Object onRetainNonConfigurationInstance() 
{
  if (moInstanceOfAClass != null) // Check that the object exists
      return(moInstanceOfAClass);
  return super.onRetainNonConfigurationInstance();
}
share|improve this answer
    
@MartinBelcher-Eigo Article says about data in SharedPreferences that "This data is written to the database on the device.." I believe that the data is stored in a file in the app's directory of the file system. –  Tom Nov 26 '12 at 22:43
1  
@Tom SharefPrefs data is written to xml file. Is xml a kind of database? I'd say it is ;) –  MaciejGórski May 2 '13 at 10:35
1  
Note that editor.apply() is faster than editor.commit(). –  Fred Jul 9 at 20:35

This is a classic 'gotcha' of Android development. There are two issues here:

  • There is a subtle Android Framework bug which greatly complicates application stack management during development, at least on legacy versions (not entirely sure if/when/how it was fixed). I'll discuss this bug below.
  • The 'normal' or intended way to manage this issue is, itself, rather complicated with the duality of onPause/onResume and onSaveInstanceState/onRestoreInstanceState

Browsing across all these threads, I suspect that much of the time developers are talking about these two different issues simultaneously ... hence all the confusion and reports of "this doesn't work for me".

First, to clarify the 'intended' behavior: onSaveInstance and onRestoreInstance are fragile and only for transient state. The intended usage (afaict) is to handle Activity recreation when the phone is rotated (orientation change). In other words, the intended usage is when your Activity is still logically 'on top', but still must be reinstantiated by the system. The saved Bundle is not persisted outside of the process/memory/gc, so you cannot really rely on this if your activity goes to the background. Yes, perhaps your Activity's memory will survive its trip to the background and escape GC, but this is not reliable (nor is it predictable).

So if you have a scenario where there is meaningful 'user progress' or state that should be persisted between 'launches' of your application, the guidance is to use onPause and onResume. You must choose and prepare a persistent store yourself.

BUT - there is a very confusing bug which complicates all of this. Details are here:

http://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=2373

http://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=5277

Basically, if your application is launched with the SingleTask flag, and then later on you launch it from the home screen or launcher menu, then that subsequent invocation will create a NEW task ... you'll effectively have two different instances of your app inhabiting the same stack ... which gets very strange very fast. This seems to happen when you launch your app during development (i.e. from Eclipse or Intellij), so developers run into this a lot. But also through some of the app store update mechanisms (so it impacts your users as well).

I battled through these threads for hours before I realized that my main issue was this bug, not the intended framework behavior. A great writeup and workaround (UPDATE: see below) seems to be from user @kaciula in this answer:

Home key press behaviour

UPDATE June 2013: Months later, I have finally found the 'correct' solution. You don't need to manage any stateful startedApp flags yourself, you can detect this from the framework and bail appropriately. I use this near the beginning of my LauncherActivity.onCreate:

if (!isTaskRoot()) {
    Intent intent = getIntent();
    String action = intent.getAction();
    if (intent.hasCategory(Intent.CATEGORY_LAUNCHER) && action != null && action.equals(Intent.ACTION_MAIN)) {
        finish();
        return;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

onSaveInstanceState is called when the system needs memory and kills an application. It is not called when the user just closes the application. So I think application state should also be saved in onPause It should be saved to some persistent storage like Preferences or Sqlite

share|improve this answer
20  
Sorry, that's not quite correct. onSaveInstanceState gets called before the activity needs to be re-made. i.e. every time the user rotates the device. It is meant for storing transient view states. When android forces the application to close, onSaveInstanceState is actually NOT called (which is why it's unsafe for storing important application data). onPause, however is guaranteed to be called before the activity is killed, so it should be used to store permanent info in preferences or Squlite. Right answer, wrong reasons. –  moveaway00 Mar 28 '12 at 4:06

Both methods are useful and valid and both are best suited for different scenarios:

  1. The user terminates the application and re-opens it at a later date, but the application needs to reload data from the last session – this requires a persistent storage approach such as using SQLite.
  2. The user switches application and then comes back to the original and wants to pick up where they left off - save and restore bundle data (such as application state data) in onSaveInstanceState() and onRestoreInstanceState() is usually adequate.

If you save the state data in a persistent manner, it can be reloaded in an onResume() or onCreate() (or actually on any lifecycle call). This may or may not be desired behaviour. If you store it in a bundle in an InstanceState, then it is transient and is only suitable for storing data for use in the same user ‘session’ (I use the term session loosely) but not between ‘sessions’.

It is not that one approach is better than the other, like everything, it is just important to understand what behaviour you require and to select the most appropriate approach.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, I was getting confused by all the talk by the other answerers, your post made it clear for me. –  Yahel Jan 27 '12 at 13:06
    
How do we choose between SQLite and Preferences when looking for persistent storage? –  Deco Feb 24 '12 at 16:52

Saving state is a kludge at best as far as I'm concerned. If you need to save persistent data, just use an SQLite database. Android makes it SOOO easy.

Something like this:

import java.util.Date;
import android.content.Context;
import android.database.Cursor;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteDatabase;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteOpenHelper;

public class dataHelper {

    private static final String DATABASE_NAME = "autoMate.db";
    private static final int DATABASE_VERSION = 1;

    private Context context;
    private SQLiteDatabase db;
    private OpenHelper oh ;

    public dataHelper(Context context) {
        this.context = context;
        this.oh = new OpenHelper(this.context);
        this.db = oh.getWritableDatabase();
    }

    public void close()
    {
        db.close();
        oh.close();
        db = null;
        oh = null;
        SQLiteDatabase.releaseMemory();
    }


    public void setCode(String codeName, Object codeValue, String codeDataType)
    {
        Cursor codeRow = db.rawQuery("SELECT * FROM code WHERE codeName = '"+  codeName + "'", null);
        String cv = "" ;

        if (codeDataType.toLowerCase().trim().equals("long") == true)
        {
            cv = String.valueOf(codeValue);
        }
        else if (codeDataType.toLowerCase().trim().equals("int") == true)
        {
            cv = String.valueOf(codeValue);
        }
        else if (codeDataType.toLowerCase().trim().equals("date") == true)
        {
            cv = String.valueOf(((Date)codeValue).getTime());
        }
        else if (codeDataType.toLowerCase().trim().equals("boolean") == true)
        {
            String.valueOf(codeValue);
        }
        else
        {
            cv = String.valueOf(codeValue);
        }

        if(codeRow.getCount() > 0) //exists-- update
        {
            db.execSQL("update code set codeValue = '" + cv +
                "' where codeName = '" + codeName + "'");
        }
        else // does not exist, insert
        {
            db.execSQL("INSERT INTO code (codeName, codeValue, codeDataType) VALUES(" +
                    "'" + codeName + "'," +
                    "'" + cv + "'," +
                    "'" + codeDataType + "')" );
        }
    }

    public Object getCode(String codeName, Object defaultValue)
    {
        //Check to see if it already exists
        String codeValue = "";
        String codeDataType = "";
        boolean found = false;
        Cursor codeRow  = db.rawQuery("SELECT * FROM code WHERE codeName = '"+  codeName + "'", null);
        if (codeRow.moveToFirst())
        {
            codeValue = codeRow.getString(codeRow.getColumnIndex("codeValue"));
            codeDataType = codeRow.getString(codeRow.getColumnIndex("codeDataType"));
            found = true;
        }

        if (found == false)
        {
            return defaultValue;
        }
        else if (codeDataType.toLowerCase().trim().equals("long") == true)
        {
            if (codeValue.equals("") == true)
            {
                return (long)0;
            }
            return Long.parseLong(codeValue);
        }
        else if (codeDataType.toLowerCase().trim().equals("int") == true)
        {
            if (codeValue.equals("") == true)
            {
                return (int)0;
            }
            return Integer.parseInt(codeValue);
        }
        else if (codeDataType.toLowerCase().trim().equals("date") == true)
        {
            if (codeValue.equals("") == true)
            {
                return null;
            }
            return new Date(Long.parseLong(codeValue));
        }
        else if (codeDataType.toLowerCase().trim().equals("boolean") == true)
        {
            if (codeValue.equals("") == true)
            {
                return false;
            }
            return Boolean.parseBoolean(codeValue);
        }
        else
        {
            return (String)codeValue;
        }
    }


    private static class OpenHelper extends SQLiteOpenHelper {

        OpenHelper(Context context) {
            super(context, DATABASE_NAME, null, DATABASE_VERSION);
        }

        @Override
        public void onCreate(SQLiteDatabase db) {
            db.execSQL("CREATE TABLE IF  NOT EXISTS code" +
            "(id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, codeName TEXT, codeValue TEXT, codeDataType TEXT)");
        }

        @Override
        public void onUpgrade(SQLiteDatabase db, int oldVersion, int newVersion) {
        }
    }
}

A simple call after that

dataHelper dh = new dataHelper(getBaseContext());
String status = (String) dh.getCode("appState", "safetyDisabled");
Date serviceStart = (Date) dh.getCode("serviceStartTime", null);
dh.close();
dh = null;
share|improve this answer
2  
Because it takes too long to load an SQLite database, considering that this is on the critical path to showing the user the app's UI. I have not actually timed it, so I'm happy to be corrected, but surely loading and opening a database file won't be fast? –  Tom Nov 26 '12 at 22:10
    
Thank you so much for providing a solution a newbie can cut and paste into their app and use right away! @Tom As far as speed goes it takes about seven seconds to store 1000 pairs, but you can do it in an AsyncTask. However, you need to add a finally { cursor.close() } or it will crash from memory leak while doing this. –  Noumenon May 4 '13 at 11:46
    
I came across this and while it seems neat I'm hesitant to try utilizing this on Google Glass, which is the device I'm working on/with lately. –  SMT Oct 31 at 18:04

I think I found the answer. Let me tell what I have done in simple words:

Suppose I have two activities, activity1 and activity2 and I am navigating from activity1 to activity2 (I have done some works in activity2) and again back to activity 1 by clicking on a button in activity1. Now at this stage I wanted to go back to activity2 and I want to see my activity2 in the same condition when I last left activity2.

For the above scenario what I have done is that in the manifest I made some changes like this:

<activity android:name=".activity2"
          android:alwaysRetainTaskState="true"      
          android:launchMode="singleInstance">
</activity>

And in the activity1 on the button click event I have done like this:

Intent intent = new Intent();
intent.setFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_REORDER_TO_FRONT);
intent.setClassName(this,"com.mainscreen.activity2");
startActivity(intent);

And in activity2 on button click event I have done like this:

Intent intent=new Intent();
intent.setClassName(this,"com.mainscreen.activity1");
startActivity(intent);

Now what will happen is that whatever the changes we have made in the activity2 will not be lost, and we can view activity2 in the same state as we left previously.

I believe this is the answer and this works fine for me. Correct me if I am wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work for me. –  bagusflyer Sep 18 at 5:21
1  
@bagusflyer care to be more specific??? Your comment isn't helpful and no one can can help you based on that. –  SMT Oct 31 at 18:00

Really onSaveInstance state callen when the Activity goes to background

Quote from the docs: "the method onSaveInstanceState(Bundle) is called before placing the activity in such a background state"

share|improve this answer

Meanwhile I do in general no more use

Bundle savedInstanceState & Co

the live cycle is for most activities too complicated and not necessary. And google states itself, it is NOT even reliable.

My way is to save any changes immediately in the preferences

 SharedPreferences p;
 p.edit().put(..).commit()

in some way SharedPreferences work similar like Bundles. And naturally and at first such values have to be red from preferences.

In the case of complex data you may use Sqlite instead of using preferences.

When applying this concept, the activity just continues to use the last saved state, regardless whether it was an initial open with reboots in between or a reopen due to the back stack.

share|improve this answer

onSaveInstanceState() for transient data (restored in onCreate()/onRestoreInstanceState()), onPause() for persistent data (restored in onResume()). From Android technical resources:

onSaveInstanceState() is called by Android if the Activity is being stopped and may be killed before it is resumed! This means it should store any state necessary to re-initialize to the same condition when the Activity is restarted. It is the counterpart to the onCreate() method, and in fact the savedInstanceState Bundle passed in to onCreate() is the same Bundle that you construct as outState in the onSaveInstanceState() method.

onPause() and onResume() are also complimentary methods. onPause() is always called when the Activity ends, even if we instigated that (with a finish() call for example). We will use this to save the current note back to the database. Good practice is to release any resources that can be released during an onPause() as well, to take up less resources when in the passive state.

share|improve this answer

The onSaveInstanceState(bundle) and onRestoreInstanceState(bundle) methods are useful for data persistence merely while rotating the screen (orientation change).
They are not even good while switching between applications (since the onSaveInstanceState() method is called but onCreate(bundle) and onRestoreInstanceState(bundle) is not invoked again.
For more persistence use shared preferences. read this article

share|improve this answer

My problem was that I needed persistence only during the application lifetime (i.e. a single execution including starting other sub-activities within the same app and rotating the device etc). I tried various combinations of the above answers but did not get what I wanted in all situations. In the end what worked for me was to obtain a reference to the savedInstanceState during onCreate:

mySavedInstanceState=savedInstanceState;

and use that to obtain the contents of my variable when I needed it, along the lines of:

if (mySavedInstanceState !=null) {
   boolean myVariable = mySavedInstanceState.getBoolean("MyVariable");
}

I use onSaveInstanceStateand onRestoreInstanceState as suggested above but I guess i could also or alternatively use my method to save the variable when it changes (e.g. using putBoolean)

share|improve this answer

Sometimes even onSaveInstanceState(bundle) and onRestoreInstanceState(bundle) can be pain in the head if you have more complex activity class with a bunch of variables and instances. Therefore to skip this hard job of saving every variable in onSaveInstanceState(bundle) and restoring it on onRestoreInstanceState(bundle) you can simply add this to your manifest inside your activity tag.

<activity android:configChanges="keyboardHidden|orientation" />
share|improve this answer
3  
This method looks like a reasonable path of least resistance, but note that the API docs say that using configChanges "should be avoided and used only as a last-resort." –  gcl1 Mar 15 '13 at 18:46
3  
Using the configChanges trick kills some of the features otherwise provided by android. Things such as choosing a different layout land/port is ignored. Best use of this "trick" is when playing a video and you do not want to interrupt the streaming due to a rotation. –  slott Apr 17 '13 at 10:14

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