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To my knowledge, you specify your model field data types within db/migrations . This is new to me as in Django, you can directly specify your model field data types in the Model class. Am I correct in thinking about this? Is this a common practice in rails or am I just using a work around?

Also, how do you specify table relationships in this db/migrations file. For instance if I have a model that is called class A.

I have another model called class B and I want a one to many relationship with class A. Do I just do

class ClassA < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :projects do |t|
      t.classB :name
    end
  end
end

How do I validate that my migration file and my model file don't have any syntax errors. To my knowledge I just run rake db:migrate, but what if I don't want my migration file to be replaced as I specified my field datatypes in the file?

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Did any of the answers resolve your issue? If not, please post further problems you are encountering. If they did, please checkmark the best one as accepted answer. –  Charles Mar 5 '13 at 12:35
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3 Answers

Ok, so all in all you seem to have three questions:

1.: To my knowledge, you specify your model field data types within db/migrations. [...] Am I correct in thinking about this? Is this a common practice in rails or am I just using a work around?

Yes, you are correct about this. Field data types do not show inside the model, only in your migration.

By the way: I rarely find myself writing migration files manually. If you use the rails command, it will generate migration files automatically. For example, if you use

rails g model User first_name:string last_name:string

this will create a model called User, and a migration that will create a users table with the fields id, first_name, last_name, and timestamp fields. If you want to add or remove columns later, there is a nifty trick for that; just run

rails g migration add_fields_to_users field_name:field_type

or

rails g migration remove_fields_from_users field_name.

Replace field_name, field_type and users as you think fit. This command will create a migration for you to add or remove fields, so you don't have to write those manually.

2.: Also, how do you specify table relationships in this db/migrations file.

You don't. Rails handles this for you through association methods like has_many, belongs_to, has_and_belongs_to, etc. Have a look at this rails guide to active record associations. The one thing you need to do on the database side is add foreign_id columns for a one to many relationship or create join tables for a many to many relationship. For example, if you have a users table and a pictures table, and each picture belongs to a user, in your user model you would write has_many :pictures, in your picture model you would write belongs_to :user, and in your pictures table you need a field called user_id with a type of integer.

3.: How do I validate that my migration file and my model file don't have any syntax errors.

You don't either. You just run rake db:migrate, and if something fails, it will tell you where and why. If your model has syntax errors, it will tell you when you start your server, or when you run your tests, or at least when you use it somewhere (e.g., when you call a model's method). If you mean how you validate your model's data, this is a whole other question - refer to this guide to active record validations and callbacks, which explains validations to check for presence, uniqueness, length, etc. in detail.

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Good explanation even though I would argue that in point 2, somehow in the migrations you "specify" associations (create a column for a foreign key in a has_many association) or create a join table for a many to many association. –  Nobita Mar 2 '13 at 19:01
    
@Nobita Good point, thanks! I added that. –  Charles Mar 2 '13 at 19:05
    
+1 :) Really good answer from my point of view. –  Nobita Mar 2 '13 at 20:26
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You have asked several questions, let's go one by one:

To my knowledge, you specify your model field data types within db/migrations . This is new to me as in Django, you can directly specify your model field data types in the Model class. Am I correct in thinking about this? Is this a common practice in rails or am I just using a work around?

The migrations are used to alter the database. Example of a migration:

class CreateProducts < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :products do |t|
      t.string :name
      t.text :description
    end
  end
end

When running this, you would be creating a table products with a string field called name. So, yes, you specify your model field data types in the migrations.

Also, how do you specify table relationships in this db/migrations file. For instance if I have a model that is called class A.

You need to specify your relationships (or associations) in your models. Read this, because it is really well explained. But take into account that in the migrations somehow you have to do some work to create the associations because you might need to create join tables for many to many associations, or create a column that references another table for a has_many association.

How do I validate that my migration file and my model file don't have any syntax errors. To my knowledge I just run rake db:migrate, but what if I don't want my migration file to be replaced as I specified my field datatypes in the file?

I am not sure what you mean in this question.

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When you create a new model rails creates your shema migration files and your model. In the migration file you specify your columns. It is possible to add some code here but you should do as less as possible. For up and down you add/remove columns here, add db indexes and so on.

In your model you define your relations belongs_to, has_many, etc. and your scopes for your tables and ofc the methods for your model. Your model inherit your table columns so you can access them directly.

I don't know Django, this is the common practice in rails.

Relations and other good infos you can check here: http://www.tutorialspoint.com/ruby-on-rails/rails-models.htm

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1  
I think rails guide has quite explanatory. guides.rubyonrails.org –  Manoj Monga Mar 2 '13 at 18:55
    
So is there any way to specify my data types like :boolean in the Model class or do I always do this in the schema migration files? –  user1431282 Mar 2 '13 at 18:55
    
You define the column data types in the migration file. –  YvesR Mar 2 '13 at 18:58
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