Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

UPDATED - QUESTION

Is there a more more compact way to write a query that selects maximum records from a table, other than using a self-join?

An example would be a table of events that might have the following schema:

   EventID | EventType | Timestamp | Description
-----------+-----------+-----------+--------------
   INT     | VARCHAR   | INT       | VARCHAR

And might contain multiple records for each type of event. Let's say:

     1     |    A      |  100000   | 'First Event'
     2     |    A      |  100005   | 'Second Event'
     3     |    B      |  100009   | 'Third Event'
     4     |    A      |  100009   | 'Fourth Event'
     5     |    B      |  100010   | 'Fifth Event'
     6     |    B      |  100030   | 'Sixth Event'
     7     |    A      |  100030   | ' ... '
     8     |    C      |  100030   | ' ... '
     9     |    C      |  100050   | ' ... '

And let's say I'd like to know what were the most recent events of each type - which would be Events #6, #7 and #9. Then I would have to write a query that looks like this:

SELECT EventID
     , EventType
     , Timestamp
     , Description
  FROM EventsTable T
 INNER JOIN (SELECT EventType
                  , MAX(Timestamp) 
               FROM EventsTable TInner
              GROUP BY EventType) TSelf
         ON T.Timestamp = TSelf.Timestamp
         AND T.EventType = TSelf.EventType

So the question boils down to: Is there a more compact way to express the same query, ideally without having to resort to a JOIN?

share|improve this question
1  
Don't ask performance questions without stating RDBMS. It is meaningless. SQL is declarative. How it is optimised is implementation dependant. SQL Server for example could use a “Segment Top” Query Optimisation and the execution plan not contain a self join at all. –  Martin Smith Mar 2 '13 at 20:20
    
@MartinSmith - good point. Updated the question tags –  Miky Dinescu Mar 2 '13 at 20:22
    
So what execution plan do you actually get for that query in SQL Server? –  Martin Smith Mar 2 '13 at 20:22
1  
Then this is a greatest n per group query. You can either self join on an aggregate as per your question. CROSS APPLY (SELECT TOP 1 or use ROW_NUMBER –  Martin Smith Mar 2 '13 at 20:41
1  
That's my stack overflowing finished for now anyway. Got something else to do! –  Martin Smith Mar 2 '13 at 20:44
show 5 more comments

4 Answers

If you don't want to use order by use this:

SELECT * FROM EventsTable WHERE EventType = 'B' AND
Timestamp = (SELECT Max(Timestamp) FROM EventsTable WHERE EventType = 'B');

If order by is ok:

Mysql:

SELECT * FROM EventsTable WHERE EventType = 'B' ORDER BY Timestamp DESC LIMIT 1;

Sql Server:

SELECT TOP 1 * FROM EventsTable WHERE EventType = 'B' ORDER BY Timestamp DESC

Plz see fiddle.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Didn't realize that you just need one row to be returned. Use Common Table Expression to achieve the desired result. Simple and Cleaner.

;WITH CTE
AS
(
    SELECT EventID, 
           EventType, 
           Timestamp,
           Description
    FROM EventsTable 
    WHERE EventType = 'B'
)

SELECT TOP 1 * FROM CTE 
ORDER BY TIMESTAMP DESC
share|improve this answer
    
This is not any more compact that the query I gave as example.. You're replacing a query+subquery with a CTE –  Miky Dinescu Mar 2 '13 at 20:42
    
Right, though one of the ways without a JOIN. :D –  Praveen Nambiar Mar 2 '13 at 20:47
add comment

Try this..

SELECT EventID, EventType, Timestamp, Description
FROM EventsTable
WHERE EventType = 'B' AND 
      Timestamp = (SELECT max(Timestamp) FROM EventsTable WHERE EventType = 'B');
share|improve this answer
    
This is not any more compact than the query I gave as example.. –  Miky Dinescu Mar 2 '13 at 20:40
    
Ok.. That will be fine –  Srinivas Mar 3 '13 at 3:35
add comment
SELECT EventID, EventType, Timestamp, Description
FROM EventsTable T
WHERE T.EventType = 'B'
ORDER BY Timestamp
LIMIT 1

should do the trick (For DBMS that supports LIMIT).

share|improve this answer
    
Good answer if the DBMS support LIMIT. As the question was just tagged "sql" you might want to add a qualifier to your answer. –  Ray Toal Mar 2 '13 at 20:13
    
good point @RayToal. Answer updated. –  Ed Heal Mar 2 '13 at 20:21
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.