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I am writing a userscript for some site. I need to access inner variable in a function. For example, in following code i need to access "private property" b of object c

function a(){
    var b;
    //assignment to b and other stuff
};
var c=new a();

I CANNOT CHANGE THE SITE'S CODE, I ONLY CAN CHANGE BORWSER EXTENSION SCRIPTISH AND WRITE A USERSCRIPT. My browser is the latest firefox. I need to gain access even if i would have to change Scriptish.

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4  
You can't do that directly, assign b as a property of this and it will be a property of c. Either that, or attach a method/function that returns the value of b. (You'll have to create that function in the constructor function, it won't be available to prototype methods either) – Dominic Barnes Mar 2 '13 at 20:21
    
I think a closure would be helpful in this situation? I could be wrong though. – aug Mar 2 '13 at 20:27
    
The code is not mine, but i need to change it using only userscript and Scriptish. I am not able to make и global, it was intentionally made local to prevent userscripts writing. One more time : I AM WRITING A USERSCRIPT. USING FIDDLER AND ITS SCRIPTING ENGINE IS ALSO NOT GOOD SOLUTION. – KOLANICH Mar 2 '13 at 20:47
    
Private properties are private. This is why they are called private. – Hogan Mar 3 '13 at 3:29
    
It seems that info from getfirebug.com/wiki/index.php/Jsd and addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/fireclosure can help me. – KOLANICH Mar 3 '13 at 8:53

You can't access to your inner variable of your function, you should make it global variable to get it from outside.

var b;
function a(){
 b=1;
    //assignment to b and other stuff
};
var c=new a();
document.write(c.b);

and the output will be 1.

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1  
No. In the question the b inside function a is local. You are only changing the global one. Change the line b=1; to var b=1 and re-test. – Hogan Mar 3 '13 at 14:06

In your code b isn't a private variable, but a local variable. And after execution of var c=new a(); b doesn't exist anymore. Thus, you can't access it.

But if you use closures, everything changes:

function a(){
    var b;
    //assignment to b and other stuff
    this.revealB = function() {
        return b;
    }
};
var c = new a();
alert(c.revealB());

Here b is still a local variable, but its lifetime is affected by closure, thus it's still alive when we call revealB.

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There is no function revealB in the OP's original post -- and he can't change that code. – Hogan Mar 3 '13 at 14:06

It is quite simple thing to do, and it is great for inheritance applications:

You simply return whatever you want, and maybe return it through methods, later reuse it in other functions and build up on it.

Example follows:

    function a(){
        var b;
        //assignment to b and other stuff
        return b;
      };

     // or

   function a(){
        var b, result;
        //assignment to b and other stuff
        returnInitial: function() {
           return b;
         }
        // other stuff with b
        return result;
   };

Later you can use so called "parasitic inheritance" and initiate this whole function inside other function using all local variables and adding new methods, like so:

var a function() {
        var b, result;
        //assignment to b and other stuff
        returnInitial: function() {
           return b;
         }
        // other stuff with b
        return result;
}
var extendedA function() {
    var base = new a;
    var b = a.returnInitial();
    a.addToB = function (c) {
    var sum = c + a.returnInitial();
    return sum;
    }
}

So you can now get

var smt = new extendA();
var c = 12; //some number
var sumBC = extendA.addToB(c);

For all there is to these great practices, I recommend yutube search for doug crockford's lectures on js objects handling.

Note that you need to use new since dynamic object handling which javascript uses can crash your original object if you do not initialize a fresh instance.

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This does not work -- there is no function that returns b in the OP's question. – Hogan Mar 3 '13 at 14:04

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