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I have a file with the following random structures:

USMS 1362224754632|<REQ MSISDN="00966590832186" CONTRACT="580" SUBSCRIPTION="AAA" FORMAT="ascii" TEXT="L2"

or

USMS 1362224754632|<REQ MSISDN="00966590832186" CONTRACT="580" SUBSCRIPTION="BBB" THRESHOLDID="1" FORMAT="ascii" TEXT="L2"

I am trying to parse it with perl to get the values like the following:

1362224754632;00966590832186;580;AAA;L2

Below is the code:

if($Record =~ /USMS (.*?)|<REQ MSISDN="(.*?)" CONTRACT="(.*?)" SUBSCRIPTION="(.*?)" FORMAT="(.*?)" THRESHOLDID="(.*?)" TEXT="(.*?)"/)
{
                              print LOGFILE "$1;$2;$3;$4;$5;$6;$7\n";
}
elsif($Record =~ /USMS (.*?)|<REQ MSISDN="(.*?)" CONTRACT="(.*?)" SUBSCRIPTION="(.*?)" FORMAT="(.*?)" TEXT="(.*?)"/)
{
                              print LOGFILE "$1;$2;$3;$4;$5;$6\n";
}

But I am getting always:

;;;;;

Any help, Thanks. Heithem

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Pipe (|) is a special character in regular expressions. Escape it, like: \| and it will work.

if($Record =~ /USMS (.*?)\|<REQ MSISDN="(.*?)" CONTRACT="(.*?)" SUBSCRIPTION="(.*?)" FORMAT="(.*?)" THRESHOLDID="(.*?)" TEXT="(.*?)"/)

and the same for the else branch.

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Thanks, it fixed the issue. –  Heithem Mokaddem Mar 2 '13 at 22:19

Change

(.*?) 

to

([a-zA-Z0-9]*)
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This would give him 1362224754632;;;;; instead of just ;;;;;, but wouldn't fix the unescaped pipe problem. It's still good advice in general, though. –  Ilmari Karonen Mar 2 '13 at 22:03

Instead of using a single regex, I would split the data into its separate sections first, then approach them separately.

my($usms_part, $request) = split / \s* \|<REQ \s* /x, $Record;

my($usms_id) = $usms_part =~ /^USMS (\d+)$/;

my %request;
while( $request =~ /(\w+)="(.*?)"/g ) {
    $request{$1} = $2;
}

Rather than having to hard code all the possible key/value pairs, and their possible orderings, you can parse them generically in one piece of code.

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@Schwern - I up'd your answer. If any of keys are changed in the data file, the original regular expressions will fail - this includes: order of keys, spelling of the keys, and the key counts. Far better to have a more open (or general-purpose?) capturing of the key/value pairs, to account for future changes. And storing in an indexed hash, good add. Though I would have used some form of 'record-number' for the first level key: '$request{$rnum}{$1} = $2;' –  Jim Black Mar 3 '13 at 2:31
    
I would follow that approach as well. –  snoofkin Mar 3 '13 at 17:08

It looks like all you want is the fields contained in double-quotes.

That looks like this

use strict;
use warnings;

while (<DATA>) {
  my @values = /"([^"]+)"/g;
  print join(';', @values), "\n";
}

__DATA__
USMS 1362224754632|<REQ MSISDN="00966590832186" CONTRACT="580" SUBSCRIPTION="AAA" FORMAT="ascii" TEXT="L2"
USMS 1362224754632|<REQ MSISDN="00966590832186" CONTRACT="580" SUBSCRIPTION="BBB" THRESHOLDID="1" FORMAT="ascii" TEXT="L2"

output

00966590832186;580;AAA;ascii;L2
00966590832186;580;BBB;1;ascii;L2
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