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I have added data (double values from 1.0 - 9.0) to each of my nodes. Now I am trying to access each data to modify it so that the double values in each node are negative (-1.0 through -9.0):

void traverseList(struct List *list, void (*func) (void *)) {
    struct Node *current = list->head;
    while(current) {
        func(current->data);
        current = current->next;
    }
}

void changeToNegative(void *data) {
    double newData = *((double*)data) * -1.0;
    data = &newData;
}

I am calling the above with:

traverseList(&list, &changeToNegative);
traverseList(&list, &print);

However, it still prints out only the positive values...I am reassigning a new memory location to data, so I don't understand how it is still pointing to the old memory location. Any help appreciated!

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What is the declaration for Node? –  Code-Apprentice Mar 2 '13 at 21:53
    
struct Node { void *data; struct Node *next; }; –  user1889966 Mar 2 '13 at 21:58
    
Please give an example of how you create and use your List. The solutions selected below are on the right track but are incomplete because your question is missing important details for us to provide a complete answer. –  Code-Apprentice Mar 2 '13 at 22:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted
void changeToNegative(void *data) {
    double newData = *((double*)data) * -1.0;
    data = &newData;
}

The last line of this function sets the pointer named data to point to a new location than the one originally passed to the function. It does not affect the data stored at the original memory location. Instead you want to dereference the pointer and set it to the new value:

*data = *((double*)newData);
share|improve this answer
1  
why is it that when compiling the code with the above changes I receive these errors: warning: dereferencing ‘void *’ pointer [enabled by default] mylist.c:110:5: error: invalid use of void expression –  user1889966 Mar 2 '13 at 22:15
1  
@user1889966 Because my suggested solution is incorrect. In order to fix my answer, I need some more details, though. See my comment to your question. –  Code-Apprentice Mar 2 '13 at 22:17
    
I am refraining from posting all my code but thank you for your insight, I have a better understanding of my mistake and how pointers work. –  user1889966 Mar 2 '13 at 22:31
1  
I believe the problem lies in the fact that newData is of type double. Thus, assigning it to data of type void will cause an error. –  user1889966 Mar 2 '13 at 22:39
1  
@user1889966 You are correct that you cannot assign a double value to a variable of type void, if such a thing even exists. Another issue arises before anything with the assignment operator: you cannot use the * dereferencing operator with a void* variable. I will edit my answer to show how to fix this. –  Code-Apprentice Mar 2 '13 at 22:56

Modify your code as below. Instead of assigning pointer to data assign value as below

void changeToNegative(void *data) {
   double newData = *((double*)data) * -1.0;
   *data = newData;
}

This way you will be modifying the value pointed to by data and changes will be persistent.

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Please explain why this is the correct solution. –  Code-Apprentice Mar 2 '13 at 21:53
    
@Code-Guru I was still writing. I think now it is clear –  Hassan TM Mar 2 '13 at 21:55
    
+1 for the correct solution. My guess is that the downvote was for the originally answer which only contained code. –  Code-Apprentice Mar 2 '13 at 22:00
    
Good answer :) :) –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 2 '13 at 22:14

Your error:

void changeToNegative(void *data) {
    double newData = *((double*)data) * -1.0;
    data = &newData;
}

In function changeToNegative(void *data) you are modifying data. While you are to modify *data. See argument is void* data that is pass by address so that reflect change in calling function.

Simply do like:

   void changeToNegative(void *data) { 
      *((double*)data) *=-1;   // nagt value pointed data pointer
   }
share|improve this answer
    
The original code doesn't "return" anything, even with your loose definition of the word. It changes the value of a local variable (a pointer), but does not change the value of the memory that the pointer orignally pointed to. –  Code-Apprentice Mar 2 '13 at 21:57
    
Thank you. Total newbie at C, finding pointers a bit difficult. –  user1889966 Mar 2 '13 at 21:58
    
@Code-Guru: well, OK… it completely depends of your idea of why the author comes to do erroneous code: trying to assign a new value to the memory pointed, or trying to assign a new pointer to a new memory with the modified value. –  qPCR4vir Mar 2 '13 at 22:18
1  
+1 This is the most correct answer so far because of the cast from void* to double*. It is difficult to be certain, however, because the OP does not include enough information to be sure that data really points to a double. –  Code-Apprentice Mar 2 '13 at 22:20
2  
@Code-Guru Ah Code-Guru When I came to this post I saw question was already answered. qPCR4vir's answer was good but I feel OP will find it helpful if I add some more words. Its fun to work together on good answer :) –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 3 '13 at 7:17
void changeToNegative(void *data) {
    double* theData = (double*)data;
    *theData = (*theData) * -1.0;
}

You were assigning the local copy of data within the changeToNegative function with the address of the modified data, which will not be reflected in the caller's function. Instead de-reference and modify the data in-place so that the change is reflected back to the caller.

share|improve this answer
1  
What does it mean to multiply a pointer by -1? Does that even compile? –  Code-Apprentice Mar 2 '13 at 21:57
    
Thanks!, fixed the typo. –  Tuxdude Mar 2 '13 at 21:58
1  
Also, the original code does not return the address of a local variable. It sets a local pointer variable to point to another local variable, which is perfectly valid but does not do what the OP wants. –  Code-Apprentice Mar 2 '13 at 21:59
1  
By perfectly valid, you mean compiler does not complain? Returning back from the function, the address of a variable on the stack is not something that you would want to do anytime. –  Tuxdude Mar 2 '13 at 22:01
    
There is no return statement in the OP's code; it sets a local pointer to point to a local variable which is well defined. The runtime error that you refer to does not apply here. –  Code-Apprentice Mar 2 '13 at 22:02

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