Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This might be a case for the switch-off rule explained in C++ coding standards and I am wondering if I am doing it correctly. I am wondering because I still have if-clauses in the switching function.

Class A never gets instantiated directly, it's always either B or C that get dynamically created and uniformly handled through a (shared) pointer to A. foo switches and selects the operation depending on whether it's an B or C.

class A {
public:
  virtual ~A(){}
};

class B : public A {};
class C : public A {};

typedef std::shared_ptr<A> Aptr;
typedef std::shared_ptr<B> Bptr;
typedef std::shared_ptr<C> Cptr;


template<class T>
std::shared_ptr<T> get(const Aptr& pA) {
  return std::dynamic_pointer_cast< T >( pA );
}

void foo( const Bptr& pB ) {
  std::cout << "operate on B\n";
}

void foo( const Cptr& pC ) {
  std::cout << "operate on C\n";
}

void foo( const Aptr& pA ) {
  if ( auto x = get<B>(pA) ) {
    foo(x);
    return;
  }
  if ( auto x = get<C>(pA) ) {
    foo(x);
    return;
  }
  assert(!"oops");
}


int main()
{
  Aptr pA( new C );

  foo( pA );
}

My question is whether void foo( const Aptr& pA ) can be implemented more elegantly. That could mean without if. Is throwing in get and catching in foo recommended in this situation?

share|improve this question
    
Use a virtual function? –  GManNickG Mar 2 '13 at 21:53
    
B and C have very different interface. Some are common and remain in A. So, i don't want to operate through virtuals. –  wpunkt Mar 2 '13 at 21:55
    
B and C can still have different interfaces beside foo(). –  Olaf Dietsche Mar 2 '13 at 21:59
1  
You're doing a Bad Thing. You've written a function foo that accepts any A, but can't actually act on all instances of A, only those that are of type B or C. If those are the only classes derived from A then you've done a slightly different Bad Thing, which is to rely on knowing an exhaustive list of all classes in a hierarchy (and on nobody ever instantiating A directly). You shouldn't really expect a Bad Thing to be elegant. –  Steve Jessop Mar 2 '13 at 22:05
    
My example was too much boiled down. Of course virtuals can do this and are more accurate here. Since I don't like editing a question so it has a different solution, I will probably post a new question. –  wpunkt Mar 2 '13 at 22:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unless you have good reasons for doing otherwise (and if you have them, your code does not show them), this seems to me like the typical use case for dynamic polymorphism achieved through a virtual function:

class A 
{
public:
    virtual ~A() {}
    virtual void foo() = 0;
};

class B : public A 
{
    virtual void foo() 
    {
        std::cout << "operate on B\n";
    }
};

class C : public A 
{
    virtual void foo() 
    {
        std::cout << "operate on B\n";
    }
};

Besides, in C++11 it is preferable to use std::make_shared<>() over the construction of a shared_ptr with a naked new allocation (again, unless you have good reasons to do otherwise):

int main()
{
    Aptr pA = std::make_shared<C>();
    pA->foo();
}

If you have reasons not to use virtual functions and prefer a different, non-intrusive kind of polymorphism, you may use Boost.Variant in combination with boost::static_visitor. This does not even require B and C to be related.

#include <boost/variant.hpp>
#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

class B /* ... */ {};
class C /* ... */ {};

// ...
typedef std::shared_ptr<B> Bptr;
typedef std::shared_ptr<C> Cptr;

struct foo_visitor : boost::static_visitor<void>
{
    void operator () (Bptr p)
    {
        std::cout << "operate on B\n";
    }

    void operator () (Cptr p)
    {
        std::cout << "operate on C\n";
    }
};

int main()
{
    boost::variant<Bptr, Cptr> ptr;
    ptr = std::make_shared<C>();

    foo_visitor v;
    ptr.apply_visitor(v);
}

This approach is pretty similar to the one you chose, except that Boost.Variant also makes sure you are not forgetting to include a handling case for each of the values the variant could possibly assume (in this case, Bptr and Cptr).

share|improve this answer

Just use virtual member functions. There's no substitute for the real thing

class A {
public:
  virtual ~A(){}
  virtual void foo() = 0;
};

class B : public A {
public:
  virtual void foo() {
     std::cout << "operate on B\n";
  }
};

class C : public A {
public:
  virtual void foo() {
     std::cout << "operate on C\n";
  }
};

and pick a good C++ introductory book.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.