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Whats the difference between "Class" only and "Private Class" declaration in C#?

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marked as duplicate by Steve, Tom, EdChum, arx, Emil Mar 3 '13 at 0:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Possible dupe: stackoverflow.com/q/3235283/1563422 –  Danny Beckett Mar 2 '13 at 22:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If these are nested classes, there's no difference:

namespace Foo
{
    public class Outer
    {
        private class ExplicitlyPrivate {}

        class ImplicitlyPrivate {}
    }
}

Type members always default to being private.

If it's a top-level class, then you can't make it private - but the default is internal:

namespace Foo
{
    class ClassIsInternalByDefault {}
}
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Thanks! Good reply –  user1034912 Mar 2 '13 at 23:13

When you declare a class without specifying an accessibility modifier it will default to the lowest accessibility possible.

More practically, specifying private when private is not permissible can result in a compilation error.

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A simple answer is to say that a private class is meant to protect attributes within that class from being changed by any external classes, other than during construction of the program. A normal "class", well, doesn't have that protection.

It is a form of ENCAPSULATION.

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