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Very new to classes in PHP, How can I access the variable from within the class inside a function?

 //how can I echo the value of the title variable outside the class?
 echo $title; 
 class myClass {

  function form() {
      echo '<input type="text" value="'.$title.'" />';
   }

 }   

Thanks for the help

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closed as unclear what you're asking by mario, andrewsi, Cyclone, nKn, NDM Mar 20 at 12:29

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
do you want to access a variable that is outside the class while you are in the class, or should the variable be inside the class too ? –  Frederik.L Mar 2 '13 at 23:42
    
I need to access the value of the variable inside the class called 'tile', I need to get that value out of the class into a variable –  Grundizer Mar 2 '13 at 23:46
    
what you could do then is to add a getTile() method, which simply does: return $this->tile; Then you can call getTile from wherever you need the tile value. –  maraspin Mar 3 '13 at 0:00
    
The method idea sounds good how can I do that? –  Grundizer Mar 3 '13 at 0:22

3 Answers 3

First of all, your variable $title doesn't seem to be defined anywhere in the scope of the code you have shared.


Nonetheless, I can share four ways to handle this.

1. By having title as a member of the class myClass, which would be specific for every instance of that class

class myClass {
    public $title = '';
  function form() {
      echo '<input type="text" value="'.$this->title.'" />';
   }

}

$myClass = new myClass();
$myClass->title = 'My title';

2. By using a constant within the class, which will be the same on all myClass class instances

class myClass {
     const title = 'My title';
  function form() {
      echo '<input type="text" value="'.myClass::title.'" />';
   }

}

3. Passing the variable to the function you will be calling

class myClass {
  function form($title) {
      echo '<input type="text" value="'.$title.'" />';
   }

}

$myClass = new myClass();
$myClass->form('My title');

4. Using a global variable like you are trying to do.

Please, use global variables with caution. Don't use them if you don't need to as explained here and here.

$title = 'My title';
class myClass {
    function form() {
        global $title; // <-- declare here that we will use the global variable $title
        echo '<input type="text" value="'.$title.'" />';
    }
}
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1  
yeah, why not passing an argument in 1) instead of using global? –  Marko D Mar 2 '13 at 23:57
1  
@MarkoD Left overs... fixed now, thanks! –  Shef Mar 3 '13 at 0:04
1  
i'd just suggest that you put the solution using global at the end of your list, as the least good (or no good at all) –  Marko D Mar 3 '13 at 0:07
1  
@maraspin Encapsulation could be given back by declaring the variable as private and initializing it on instantiation, but that would give the OP more than s/he can chew. –  Shef Mar 3 '13 at 0:26
2  
@maraspin There are 1 billion great suggestions we could give to beginners. For example in this case, to escape the given input to protect their app against XSS and so on and so forth. Practice will teach them the best ways of doing it! Whoever hungers to learn, will learn the best practices. This is just the beginnings. There is a long way ahead of them to learn all of the bests. –  Shef Mar 3 '13 at 0:34

What you could do, so to be able to use an outside variable, without having to rely on globals (a bad practice) is to pass the variable from outside. Like this:

  class myClass {

    function form($title) {
      echo '<input type="text" value="'.$title.'" />';
     }

 }   

and then you can call your function like this:

$class = new myClass();
$class->form('This is going to be the title');

Globals are bad, because you create couplings and you lose track of what happens around your application. By modifying a global variable in one place, you risk of hurting code somewhere else. Therefore it's always better to rely on encapsulation, and explicitly "inject" stuff you need.

share|improve this answer
 class myClass {
 public $title;     
  function form() {
      echo '<input type="text" value="'.$this->title.'" />';
   }

 }  

You said, how to access within a class, but in your example, your property/variable was not inside the class. Just sayin..

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