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I have tried looking around and tried all the solutions but I cannot seem to fix my problem. I know i get the segmentation fault on the push_front line but I am just lost. Here is the code-

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <sstream>
#include <list>

using namespace std;

typedef std::list<int> hSlots; //the list
typedef hSlots* hTable; //an array of lists

class HashTable
{
private:
int p; //p=number of slots in the hash table
hTable tmpPtr;
hTable *table;

 public:
HashTable(int p1);
int h1(int k);
~HashTable();

void chainedHashInsert(int x);

};

 HashTable::HashTable(int p1)
 {
p=p1;
hTable tTable[p];

//initializing to empty lists
for (int i=0; i<p; i++)
{
    tmpPtr = new hSlots;
    tTable[i] = tmpPtr;
}

table = tTable;
}

//destrcutor
HashTable::~HashTable()
{
delete table;
delete tmpPtr;
}

void HashTable::chainedHashInsert(int x)
{
tmpPtr = table[h1(x)];
cout<<"hashed"<<endl;
tmpPtr->push_front(x); //segmentation fault
}

int HashTable::h1(int k)
{
    int z = k%p;
    return z;
}

I have not used a lot of lists so I'm not too sure

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table is pointing to memory that goes out of scope, which isn't even allocated with new[], so why delete[] it? Also, tmpPtr will only point to one newed piece of memory, so deleting it leaves the rest unfreed. This is why RAII is so great. –  chris Mar 3 '13 at 1:46
    
simplified, generalized: liveworkspace.org/code/2bvvmS$1 –  sehe Mar 3 '13 at 1:58
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

since tTable is local variable to HashTable, it disappears when HashTable method returns and leaves table as a dangling pointer. So to get rid of that do as below; create a space for table using new.

HashTable::HashTable(int p1)
 {
p=p1;
table  = new ttTable[p];

//initializing to empty lists
for (int i=0; i<p; i++)
{
    tmpPtr = new hSlots;
    table[i] = tmpPtr;
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect it worked! Thanks –  user2127904 Mar 3 '13 at 2:38
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Maybe this could be a proper answer after all.

Your problems arise from doing memory management (wrong) manually, when really there is no need to, in C++.

Here's my take on it using direct automatic memory management in C++:

#include <vector>
#include <list>

using namespace std;

template <typename T, typename hSlots = std::list<T> >
class HashTable
{
private:
    int p; //p=number of slots in the hash table
    std::vector<hSlots> table;
    int getbucket(int k) { return k%p; }

public:
    HashTable(int p1) : p(p1), table(p1) {}

    void chainedHashInsert(int x)
    {
        auto& tmpPtr = table[getbucket(x)];
        tmpPtr.push_front(x);
    }
};

int main()
{
    HashTable<int> table(37);
}
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table = tTable;

This line is the problem (or at least one of them).

You're stashing a pointer to an automatic object into a member variable, then dereferencing (and deleting!) it later, once the object has been destroyed.

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