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I am having trouble understanding how to pass in a struct (by reference) to a function so that the struct's member functions can be populated. So far I have written:

bool data(struct *sampleData)
{

}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

      struct sampleData {

        int N;
        int M;
        string sample_name;
        string speaker;
     };
         data(sampleData);

}

The error I get is:

C++ requires a type specifier for all declarations bool data(const &testStruct)

I have tried some examples explained here: Simple way to pass temporary struct by value in C++?

Hope someone can Help me.

share|improve this question
    
you are passing a type name to a function not a variable? –  billz Mar 3 '13 at 2:20
    
That isn't by reference, that's by pointer. You didn't make an instance of sampleData so it has no name. Also, how is the function bool data supposed to know sampleData exists? –  Rapptz Mar 3 '13 at 2:21
    
@billz sampleData is the name of my struct. I want to be able to pass this struct to the function –  Phorce Mar 3 '13 at 2:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 30 down vote accepted

First, the signature of your data() function:

bool data(struct *sampleData)

cannot possibly work, because the argument lacks a name. When you declare a function argument that you intent to actually access, it needs a name. So change it to something like:

bool data(struct sampleData *samples)

But in C++, you don't need to use struct at all actually. So this can simply become:

bool data(sampleData *samples)

Second, the sampleData struct is not known to data() at that point. So you should declare it before that:

struct sampleData {
    int N;
    int M;
    string sample_name;
    string speaker;
};

bool data(sampleData *samples)
{
    samples->N = 10;
    samples->M = 20;
    // etc.
}

And finally, you need to create a variable of type sampleData. For example, in your main() function:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    sampleData samples;
    data(&samples);
}

Note that you need to pass the address of the variable to the data() function, since it accepts a pointer.

However, note that in C++ you can directly pass arguments by reference and don't need to "emulate" it with pointers. You can do this instead:

// Note that the argument is taken by reference (the "&" in front
// of the argument name.)
bool data(sampleData &samples)
{
    samples.N = 10;
    samples.M = 20;
    // etc.
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    sampleData samples;

    // No need to pass a pointer here, since data() takes the
    // passed argument by reference.
    data(samples);
}
share|improve this answer
bool data(sampleData *data)
{
}

You need to tell the method which type of struct you are using. In this case, sampleData.

Note: In this case, you will need to define the struct prior to the method for it to be recognized.

Example:

struct sampleData
{
   int N;
   int M;
   // ...
};

bool data(struct *sampleData)
{

}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

      sampleData sd;
      data(&sd);

}

Note 2: I'm a C guy. There may be a more c++ish way to do this.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand now. The struct "sample_data" should be before the function itself? –  Phorce Mar 3 '13 at 2:22
1  
Once again, this isn't by reference, that's by pointer. –  Rapptz Mar 3 '13 at 2:30

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