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I'm trying to make some simple modifications to a program from Real World Haskell Chapter 24. Here's some code that counts the number of lines in a file:

import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8 as LB
lineCount :: [LB.ByteString] -> Int64
lineCount = mapReduce rdeepseq (LB.count '\n')
                      rdeepseq sum

I'm trying to write some code that counts the words in the file. Here's what I came up with:

import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8 as LB
lineCount :: [LB.ByteString] -> Int64
lineCount = mapReduce rdeepseq (length LB.words)
                      rdeepseq sum

However, I get:

Couldn't match expected type `LB.ByteString -> b0'
            with actual type `Int'
In the return type of a call of `length'
Probable cause: `length' is applied to too many arguments
In the second argument of `mapReduce', namely `(length LB.words)'
In the expression:
  mapReduce rdeepseq (length LB.words) rdeepseq sum

What could be the problem?

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You want to apply length to the result of calling LB.words, not to LB.words the function. Try (length . LB.words).

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Thanks, but unfortunately this doesn't work. Now I get the error: –  Velvet Ghost Mar 3 '13 at 14:57
    
Couldn't match expected type Int64' with actual type Int' Expected type: [Int] -> Int64 Actual type: [Int] -> Int In the fourth argument of mapReduce', namely sum' In the expression: mapReduce rdeepseq (length . LB.words) rdeepseq sum –  Velvet Ghost Mar 3 '13 at 14:57
    
Oh wait, it worked when I changed the function to lineCount :: [LB.ByteString] -> Int instead of lineCount :: [LB.ByteString] -> Int64. Thanks! –  Velvet Ghost Mar 3 '13 at 14:59
    
No problem! For future reference, it's sometimes useful when facing type errors to delete your own annotations if you think you've got the code right. Sometimes the error is there and sometimes, even more excitingly, the compiler will infer a more general type than you thought you had. –  J. Abrahamson Mar 3 '13 at 19:03
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