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I'm writing the function to add 2 polynomials together, the case where 2 polynomials have the same amount of highest degree (all terms need not to be entered) works fine, but the case where two polys have different degree is not working, the function somehow store some big value as the coefficients

This is the function

// overload +
Polynomial Polynomial::operator+(const Polynomial &right)
{
    // get the highest exponent value for result
    int highestExp = 0;
    if (maxExp < right.maxExp)
        highestExp = right.maxExp;
    else if (maxExp >= right.maxExp)
        highestExp = maxExp;

    Polynomial res;
    res.setPolynomial(highestExp);

    for (int coeff=0; coeff < highestExp; coeff++)
            res.poly[0][coeff] = poly[0][coeff] + right.poly[0][coeff];

    return res;
}

for example, case1: highest exps are equal

The first (original) polynomial is:
 - 4x^0 + x^1 + 4x^3 - 3x^4
The second polynomial is:
 - x^0 - x^3
The result polynomial is:
 - 5x^0 + x^1 + 3x^3 - 3x^4

case2: highest exponents are not equal

The first (original) polynomial is:
 - 4x^0 + x^1 + 4x^3 - 3x^4 (highest exp = 4)
The second polynomial is:
 - x^0 - x^3 (highest exp = 5)
The result polynomial is:
 - 5x^0 + x^1 + 3x^3 - 3x^4 - 33686019x^5 (highest exp = 5)

please help!

Update: Polynomial class

class Polynomial
{
private:
    int **poly;
    int maxExp;
    void createPolynomialArray(int);
public:
    Polynomial();
    Polynomial(int); // constructor
    Polynomial(const Polynomial &); // copy constructor
    ~Polynomial(); // destructor

    // setter
    void setCoefficient(int,int);
    void setPolynomial(int);

    // getters
    int getTerm() const; 
    int getCoefficient(int,int) const; 

    // overloading operators
    void operator=(const Polynomial &); // assignment
    Polynomial operator+(const Polynomial &); // addition    
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by George Stocker Mar 4 '13 at 13:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Seing the actual definition of the Polynomial class will likely do wonders in expediting this question. Please include it in your question post. Thank you. –  WhozCraig Mar 3 '13 at 4:33
    
You are probably reading past the end of your coefficient buffer in the lower order polynomial. In the loop, once coeff is greater than the order of the smaller polynomial, you should stop reading from the elements of the smaller polynomial. –  Mankarse Mar 3 '13 at 4:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think you want

Polynomial Polynomial::operator+(const Polynomial &right)
{
    Polynomial res;
    if(maxExp < right.maxExp)
    {
        res.setPolynomial(right.maxExp);
        int coeff = 0;
        for (; coeff < maxExp; coeff++)
                res.poly[0][coeff] = poly[0][coeff] + right.poly[0][coeff];
        for (; coeff < right.maxExp; coeff++)
                res.poly[0][coeff] = right.poly[0][coeff];
    }
    else
    {
        res.setPolynomial(maxExp);
        int coeff = 0;
        for (; coeff < right.maxExp; coeff++)
                res.poly[0][coeff] = poly[0][coeff] + right.poly[0][coeff];
        for (; coeff < maxExp; coeff++)
                res.poly[0][coeff] = poly[0][coeff];
    }
    return res;
}

You are reading past the end of the shorter polynomial.

share|improve this answer
    
it works, thanks –  Herious Mar 3 '13 at 4:52
    
no problem, happy to help. –  Stephen Lin Mar 3 '13 at 4:54

You appear to be missing bounds checking on your array accesses. The reason you're seeing weird values is that in this case, the program is probably reading garbage values from uninitialized memory. But this is undefined behavior, so literally anything could happen. The worst part with bugs like this is that they often appear to work fine.

Also, I'd recommend using std::vector to store the coefficients instead of raw pointers. It's a lot easier to work with and less error prone.

P.S. Another nitpick is that I'd suggest using braces around the if and for blocks. It makes it clearer exactly what code is being included and reduces the risk of accidentally adding an extra line without updating the braces. Or heaven forbid, someone uses a multiline macro. But this is a matter of taste.

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