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C++11

The program initializes a vector, named myVec, of int vectors, and then uses a loop to print out each inner vector's elements. But I got unexpected results when trying to see what happens when I use extra curly braces. The following is also on this LiveWorkSpace for easy toggling between compilers. g++ 4.8.0 only compiles up to myVec[5]. clang++ 3.2 compiles everything:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector<std::vector<int>> myVec =
    {
        /* myVec[0] */ {1, 2},
        /* myVec[1] */ {},
        /* myVec[2] */ {{}},
        /* myVec[3] */ { {}, {} },
        /* myVec[4] */ { {}, {}, {} },
        /* myVec[5] */ {{{}}}

        /* myVec[6] */  // , { {{}}, {{}} }       // g++ 4.8.0 COMPILER ERROR
        /* myVec[7] */  // , {{{{}}}}             // g++ 4.8.0 COMPILER ERROR
        /* myVec[8] */  // , { {{{}}}, {{{}}} }   // g++ 4.8.0 COMPILER ERROR
    };

    // loop for printing
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < myVec.size(); ++i)
    {
        std::cout << "myVec[" << i << "]: ";
        for (unsigned int j = 0; j < myVec.at(i).size(); ++j)
        {
            std::cout << myVec.at(i).at(j) << ", ";
        }
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

Actual g++ 4.8.0 output:

myVec[0]: 1, 2,
myVec[1]:
myVec[2]: 0,
myVec[3]: 0, 0,
myVec[4]: 0, 0, 0,
myVec[5]: 0,

Analysis:

myVec[0] : {1, 2} :

Got expected output.

myVec[1] : {} :

Got expected output.

myVec[2] : {{}} :

This is a vector of the int 0. The inner brace initializes an int to 0.

myVec[3] : { {}, {} } :

The two inner braces initializes an int each to 0.

myVec[4] : { {}, {}, {} } :

The three inner braces initializes an int each to 0.

myVec[5] : {{{}}} :

I wanted to add yet another set of curly braces to myVec[2] to see how far I can go with adding braces before getting compiler errors. I don’t understand why this compiles and why its element prints as 0.

For example, int j = {} initializes j to 0. vector<vector<int>> v = { {{}} } initializes the innermost {} to int 0, making it equivalent to vector<vector<int>> v = { {0} }. Then, what is vector<vector<int>> u = { {{{}}} } and why would it compile?

The Hypothetical myVec[6] : { {{}}, {{}} } :

Following the same pattern as above, I wanted to make a vector that contains two sets of double curly braces. But this doesn’t compile, and I don’t understand why this breaks the pattern of giving me multiple zeroes.

The Hypothetical myVec[7] : {{{{}}}} :

I wanted to add yet another set of curly braces to myVec[5] to see how far I can go with adding braces before getting compiler errors. I don’t understand why this breaks the pattern and doesn't compile.

The Hypothetical myVec[8] : { {{{}}}, {{{}}} } :

I wanted to extend myVec[7] to to make a vector with two sets of triple braces. I don't understand why this doesn't compile either.

If everything up to myVec[5] compiles, why doesn't the rest?

share|improve this question
    
For the {{}, {}} case, think of the inner {}s being initializers for the ints, where their default constructor is called, giving them a value of 0. As for {{{}}}, I have no idea. –  Xymostech Mar 3 '13 at 5:22
1  
    
@Mankarse do [1]-[4] warn or just [5]-[8]? –  Stephen Lin Mar 3 '13 at 5:46
    
@StephenLin: Just 5-8. –  Mankarse Mar 3 '13 at 5:51
1  
-1: I'm sure it's a great question and an interesting story and all, but this is just waaaay too long. –  rubenvb Mar 4 '13 at 18:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try to compile this code. it should explain your issue:

int i = {};   // initializes i to int()
int j = {{}}; // fails to compile

why {{{}}} is accepted in your code seems to be a gcc bug(needs to clarify) related how ctor is processed:

struct foo {
    foo( std::initializer_list<int> ) {}
};
void f()
{
   foo bar1( {{{}}} ); // compiles fine
   foo bar2 = {{{}}}; // compiles fine
}

Edit (thanks to Johannes Schaub) - deleting copy ctor makes first variant uncompilable:

struct foo {
    foo( std::initializer_list<int> ) {}
    foo( const foo& ) = delete;
};
void f()
{
   foo bar1( {{{}}} ); // fails to compile: use of deleted function ‘foo::foo(const foo&)’
   foo bar2 = {{{}}}; // still compiles, neither deleting move ctor, nor assignment operator does not affect that, is copy ctor of std::initializer_list involved?
}

for member function it fails:

struct foo {
    void moo( std::initializer_list<int> ) {}
};
void f()
{
   foo bar;
   bar.moo( {{{}}} ); // fails to compile
}

This code fails as well:

std::initailizer_list<int> l = {{{}}}; // fails to compile

Same situation ctor vs member function for std::vector:

void f()
{
    std::vector<int> v( {{{}}} ) // compiles fine;
    v.assign( {{{}}} ); // fails to compile
};

gcc version 4.7.2 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.7.2-2ubuntu1)

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not OP, but the second doesn't compile for me (it doesn't seem like it should), which doesn't seem to explain why {{{}}} can initialize a vector<int> in his [5] case. –  Stephen Lin Mar 3 '13 at 5:27
    
My compiler is just giving me a warning no matter how many braces I put. –  Xymostech Mar 3 '13 at 5:28
    
(gcc 4.7.2 here, his [5] case compiles for me but int j = {{}} doesn't) –  Stephen Lin Mar 3 '13 at 5:29
1  
Ah, you're right. clang 3.3 is fine with everything, just gives a ton of warnings. –  Xymostech Mar 3 '13 at 5:31
    
I used Code::Blocks 12.11 with the GCC 4.7.1 32-bit compiler. –  CodeBricks Mar 3 '13 at 5:32

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