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I know Events are always associated with Delegates. But, I am missing some core use of Events, and trying to understand that.

I created a simple Event program, as below, and it works perfectly fine.

namespace CompleteRef3._0
{
delegate void someEventDelegate();

class EventTester
{
    public event someEventDelegate someEvent;

    public void doEvent()
    {
        if (someEvent != null) someEvent();
    }

}

class Program
{
    static void EventHandler1()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Event handler 1 called..");
    }

    static void EventHandler2()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Event handler 2 called..");
    }
    static void EventHandler3()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Event handler 3 called..");
    }


    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        EventTester evt = new EventTester();
        evt.someEvent += EventHandler1;
        evt.someEvent += EventHandler2;
        evt.someEvent += EventHandler3;
        evt.doEvent();
        Console.ReadKey();

    }
}
}

I replaced the event declaration with delegates. That is I replaced the line public event someEventDelegate someEvent; with someEventDelegate someEvent; on the above program, and I still get the same result. Now, I was confused why we need to use Events, if it can be achieved by Delegates only. What is the real use of Events?

The modified program without events is as below -

namespace CompleteRef3._0
{
delegate void someEventDelegate();

class EventTester
{
    someEventDelegate someEvent;

    public void doEvent()
    {
        if (someEvent != null) someEvent();
    }

}

class Program
{
    static void EventHandler1()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Event handler 1 called..");
    }

    static void EventHandler2()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Event handler 2 called..");
    }
    static void EventHandler3()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Event handler 3 called..");
    }


    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        EventTester evt = new EventTester();
        evt.someEvent += EventHandler1;
        evt.someEvent += EventHandler2;
        evt.someEvent += EventHandler3;
        evt.doEvent();
        Console.ReadKey();

    }
}
}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sure, you can use delegates because behind the scenes an event is a construct that wraps a delegate.

But the rationale of using events instead of delegates is the the same as for using properties instead of fields - data encapsulation. It's bad practice to expose fields (whatever they are - primitive fields or delegates) directly.

By the way, you missed a public keyword before your delegate field to make it possible in the second snippet.

Another "by the way" with the second snippet: for delegates you should use Delegate.Combine instead of "+=".

share|improve this answer
    
oh ya.. my mistake I missed the public keyword.. thanks for catching it for me. I will edit it.. Good knowledge for me to use Delegate.Combine. I was not knowing it before!... Your response is good, exactly what I thought - data encapsulation. – Deepak Raj Mar 3 '13 at 6:49
2  
Good answer except for the last line. Why shouldn't we use + and += and so on with delegates? They were put into the language to make things pretty. It is still important to understand the difference between += with events (a syntax for calling the add event accessor), and += with variables (here x += y is much like x = x + y where + can be delegate combination, string concatenation, arithmetic addition of some type, or other overloads). One problem with Delegate.Combine is that types are not checked at all compile-time. With + the compile-time types are checked. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 30 '13 at 8:11

The main purpose of events is to prevent subscribers from interfering with each other. If you do not use events, you can:

Replace other subscribers by reassigning delegate(instead of using the += operator), Clear all subscribers (by setting delegate to null), Broadcast to other subscribers by invoking the delegate.

Source: C# in a Nutshell

share|improve this answer
2  
+1. Assignment someEvent = new someEventDelegate(EventHandler2) is the problem you have with direct use of delegtes. Another link Learning C# 3.0: Master the fundamentals of C# 3.0 - Delegates and Events - this particular chapter is avialble on MSDN and goes into details on this topic. – Alexei Levenkov Mar 3 '13 at 6:30
    
thanks for your reference.. – Deepak Raj Mar 4 '13 at 5:36

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