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Here's the error I get for i in range(len(n)):

TypeError: object of type 'int' has no len()

I have seen other posts on here but haven't found the solution yet.
I'm confused. Please comment if you know what's going on here.

Here's my code:

#ch6.ex11.py

def squareEach(x):
    sqrt = x*x
    return sqrt


def main():
    n = []
    n = eval(input("Enter a list of numbers to be squared seperated by comma:\n"))
    i = 1
    sqrtn = ()

    for i in range(len(n)):
        sqrtn = squareEach(n)
        ++i

    print("Here's your results: ",sqrtn)

main()
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closed as too localized by Frédéric Hamidi, nneonneo, Volatility, oefe, Inbar Rose Mar 3 '13 at 8:46

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1  
n appears to be an integer, not a list, so it has no __len__ attribute. –  g.d.d.c Mar 3 '13 at 5:39
3  
Your code has multiple problems. You do a for over a Python range, you don't need to increment i, it happens for you because you are retrieving every number from a sequence 0-n. squareEach will not square each number, it is not equipped to iterate over its input. –  Skurmedel Mar 3 '13 at 5:43

3 Answers 3

n is an integer. You want

for i in range(n):
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Thanks guys I really appreciate your input that makes a lot of sense. –  user2128205 Mar 15 '13 at 17:08

This is what I guess you are trying to do:

def squareEach(x):
    sqrt = x*x
    return sqrt
def main():
   n = list(map(int, input("Enter a list of numbers to be squared separaded by a comma").split(',')))
   sqrtn = []
   for i in range(len(n)):
       sqrtn.append(squareEach(n[i]))
   print("Here's your results: ",sqrtn)
main()

or you can use the for loop as:

for i in n:
    sqrtn.append(squareEach(i))

or to square each element you can do:

sqrtn = [x**2 for x in n]
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Theanks for your input. I was trying to accomplish what the Schoolboy has pointed out in his first approach. But it's great to know multiple ways to accomplish same thing. –  user2128205 Mar 15 '13 at 17:26

It seems you might want to do this:

def squareEach(n):
    squares = []
    for i in n:
        squares.append(i*i)
    return squares


def main():
    msg = "Enter a list of numbers to be squared seperated by comma:\n"
    n = list(eval(input(msg)))
    sqrtn = squareEach(n)

    print("Here's your results: ",sqrtn)

main()

Well, your code has a few problems:

  1. You should change your into a list, as you are iterating through it.
  2. In Python's for loop, you don't need a loop counter (unless it is of some use to the program, which it is not in this case)
  3. i++ is not valid in Python. The Python equivalent to it is i += 1.

Also, Python executes all the lines of code in a script, so you don't need a main() function in every Python program, but there are some cases when you might want to use it.

Something else you can do:

def main():
    msg = "Enter a list of numbers to be squared seperated by comma:\n"
    n = list(eval(input(msg)))
    squares = [i**2 for i in n] # list comprehension
main()
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, this makes a lot of sense. I was specifically asked to have squareach() function just to demonstrate my knowledge and understanding of functions. I do really like the second approach you showed using for loop inside an array. I never seen that before. I definitely learned something new. –  user2128205 Mar 15 '13 at 17:20
    
@user2128205 Make sure you accept the answer that helped you the most. –  Schoolboy Mar 16 '13 at 3:11

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