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I want to reshape my dataframe from long to wide format and I loose some data that I'd like to keep. For the following example:

df<-data.frame(Par1=unlist(strsplit("AABBCCC","")),
               Par2=unlist(strsplit("DDEEFFF","")),
               ParD=unlist(strsplit("foo,bar,baz,qux,bla,xyz,meh",",")),
               Type=unlist(strsplit("pre,post,pre,post,pre,post,post",",")),
               Val=c(10,20,30,40,50,60,70))

   #     Par1 Par2 ParD Type Val
   #   1    A    D  foo  pre  10
   #   2    A    D  bar post  20
   #   3    B    E  baz  pre  30
   #   4    B    E  qux post  40
   #   5    C    F  bla  pre  50
   #   6    C    F  xyz post  60
   #   7    C    F  meh post  70

dfw<-dcast(df,
       formula = Par1+Par2~Type,
       value.var="Val",
       fun.aggregate=mean)

 #     Par1 Par2 post pre
 #   1    A    D   20  10
 #   2    B    E   40  30
 #   3    C    F   65  50

this is almost what I need but I would like to have

  1. some field keeping data from ParD field (for example, as single merged string),
  2. number of observations used for aggregation.

i.e. I would like the resulting data.frame to be as follows:

    #     Par1 Par2 post pre Num.pre Num.post ParD
    #   1    A    D   20  10      1      1    foo_bar 
    #   2    B    E   40  30      1      1    baz_qux
    #   3    C    F   65  50      1      2    bla_xyz_meh

I would be grateful for any ideas. For example, I tried to solve the second task by writing in dcast: fun.aggregate=function(x) c(Val=mean(x),Num=length(x)) - but this causes an error...

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
+1! great question! and funny manner to create a reproducible example.. –  agstudy Mar 3 '13 at 6:28
    
+1 Fantastic question, and great chance to benchmark! Please see results below –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 3 '13 at 15:59

8 Answers 8

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Solution in 2 steps using ddply ( i am not happy with , but I get the result)

dat <- ddply(df,.(Par1,Par2),function(x){
  data.frame(ParD=paste(paste(x$ParD),collapse='_'),
             Num.pre =length(x$Type[x$Type =='pre']),
             Num.post = length(x$Type[x$Type =='post']))
})

merge(dfw,dat)
 Par1 Par2 post pre        ParD Num.pre Num.post
1    A    D  2.0   1     foo_bar       1        1
2    B    E  4.0   3     baz_qux       1        1
3    C    F  6.5   5 bla_xyz_meh       1        2
share|improve this answer
    
great! Indeed, ideally I would prefer to find some 1-step solution, but such elegant thing seems to be impossible for this case, while your code does the job just as I needed. thanks a lot! –  Vasily A Mar 3 '13 at 6:40
2  
@VasilyA I don't say impossible. But dcast + ddply(plyr+reshape2) are complementary. –  agstudy Mar 3 '13 at 6:58

Late to the party, but here's another alternative using data.table:

require(data.table)
dt <- data.table(df, key=c("Par1", "Par2"))
dt[, list(pre=mean(Val[Type == "pre"]), 
          post=mean(Val[Type == "post"]), 
          pre.num=length(Val[Type == "pre"]), 
          post.num=length(Val[Type == "post"]), 
          ParD = paste(ParD, collapse="_")), 
by=list(Par1, Par2)]

#    Par1 Par2 pre post pre.num post.num        ParD
# 1:    A    D  10   20       1        1     foo_bar
# 2:    B    E  30   40       1        1     baz_qux
# 3:    C    F  50   65       1        2 bla_xyz_meh

[from Matthew] +1 Some minor improvements to save repeating the same ==, and to demonstrate local variables inside j.

dt[, list(pre=mean(Val[.pre <- Type=="pre"]),     # save .pre
          post=mean(Val[.post <- Type=="post"]),  # save .post
          pre.num=sum(.pre),                      # reuse .pre
          post.num=sum(.post),                    # reuse .post
          ParD = paste(ParD, collapse="_")), 
by=list(Par1, Par2)]

#    Par1 Par2 pre post pre.num post.num        ParD
# 1:    A    D  10   20       1        1     foo_bar
# 2:    B    E  30   40       1        1     baz_qux
# 3:    C    F  50   65       1        2 bla_xyz_meh

dt[, { .pre <- Type=="pre"                  # or save .pre and .post up front 
       .post <- Type=="post"
       list(pre=mean(Val[.pre]), 
            post=mean(Val[.post]),
            pre.num=sum(.pre),
            post.num=sum(.post), 
            ParD = paste(ParD, collapse="_")) }
, by=list(Par1, Par2)]

#    Par1 Par2 pre post pre.num post.num        ParD
# 1:    A    D  10   20       1        1     foo_bar
# 2:    B    E  30   40       1        1     baz_qux
# 3:    C    F  50   65       1        2 bla_xyz_meh

And if a list column is ok rather than a paste, then this should be faster :

dt[, { .pre <- Type=="pre"
       .post <- Type=="post"
       list(pre=mean(Val[.pre]), 
            post=mean(Val[.post]),
            pre.num=sum(.pre),
            post.num=sum(.post), 
            ParD = list(ParD)) }     # list() faster than paste()
, by=list(Par1, Par2)]

#    Par1 Par2 pre post pre.num post.num        ParD
# 1:    A    D  10   20       1        1     foo,bar
# 2:    B    E  30   40       1        1     baz,qux
# 3:    C    F  50   65       1        2 bla,xyz,meh
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 2 hours isn't late--it's just being fashionable. I had started something similar with sqldf but never bothered finishing after @agstudy's answer was posted. –  Ananda Mahto Mar 3 '13 at 8:40
1  
+1! it is always good to have multiple solution! –  agstudy Mar 3 '13 at 12:59
    
thanks, @Arun! Shame on me, I was always too lazy to read info on data.table and switch on using it... –  Vasily A Mar 3 '13 at 16:33
1  
I'm always amazed at the eloquence of the data.table solutions. Little code and lots of speed. –  Tyler Rinker Mar 3 '13 at 18:26

You could do a merge of two dcasts and an aggregate, here all wrapped into one large expression mostly to avoid having intermediate objects hanging around afterwards:

Reduce(merge, list(
    dcast(df, formula = Par1+Par2~Type, value.var="Val",
        fun.aggregate=mean),
    setNames(dcast(df, formula = Par1+Par2~Type, value.var="Val",
        fun.aggregate=length), c("Par1", "Par2", "Num.post",
        "Num.pre")),
    aggregate(df["ParD"], df[c("Par1", "Par2")], paste, collapse="_")
    ))
share|improve this answer
    
got your idea as well, thanks! –  Vasily A Mar 3 '13 at 7:10
    
+1 nice! even it is a little bit hard to read! –  agstudy Mar 3 '13 at 7:13
    
yes, I had to split it into several parts to understand - I am not good enough in R to read the code with so many nested blocks... –  Vasily A Mar 3 '13 at 7:18
    
Yeah, I'm not crazy about how the setNames function makes it hard to see the main structure of the expression, which otherwise just involves sequentially applying merge to results of the two dcasts and the aggregate. –  regetz Mar 3 '13 at 7:37
    
@regetz, sorry I had skipped over your answer by mistake. I've added it to the benchmarks below. Outperforms plyr method by strong margin on smaller sample sizes –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 3 '13 at 21:45

I'll post but agstudy's puts me to shame:

step1 <- with(df, split(df, list(Par1, Par2)))
step2 <- step1[sapply(step1, nrow) > 0]
step3 <- lapply(step2, function(x) {
    piece1 <- tapply(x$Val, x$Type, mean)
    piece2 <- tapply(x$Type, x$Type, length)
    names(piece2) <- paste0("Num.", names(piece2))
    out <- x[1, 1:2]
    out[, 3:6] <- c(piece1, piece2)
    names(out)[3:6] <-  names(c(piece1, piece2))
    out$ParD <- paste(unique(x$ParD), collapse="_")
    out
})
data.frame(do.call(rbind, step3), row.names=NULL)

Yielding:

  Par1 Par2 post pre Num.post Num.pre        ParD
1    A    D  2.0   1        1       1     foo_bar
2    B    E  4.0   3        1       1     baz_qux
3    C    F  6.5   5        2       1 bla_xyz_meh
share|improve this answer
1  
+1! you kill me :) –  agstudy Mar 3 '13 at 6:41
    
it took me a while to sort out what does your code do :) Thanks for alternative solution though! –  Vasily A Mar 3 '13 at 6:56
    
Sorry I usually annotate but am working on a project and this question distracted for a minute ;-) –  Tyler Rinker Mar 3 '13 at 7:12
1  
no prob, I really appreciate that you spent time for answering here. –  Vasily A Mar 3 '13 at 7:22

What a great opprotunity to benchmark! Below are some runs of the plyr method (as suggested by @agstudy) compared with the data.table method (as suggested by @Arun) using different sample sizes (N = 900, 2700, 10800)

Summary:
The data.table method outperforms the plyr method by a factor of 7.5

#-------------------#
#   M E T H O D S   #
#-------------------#

  # additional methods below, in the updates

  # Method 1  -- suggested by @agstudy
  plyrMethod <- quote({
                  dfw<-dcast(df,
                         formula = Par1+Par2~Type,
                         value.var="Val",
                         fun.aggregate=mean)
                  dat <- ddply(df,.(Par1,Par2),function(x){
                    data.frame(ParD=paste(paste(x$ParD),collapse='_'),
                               Num.pre =length(x$Type[x$Type =='pre']),
                               Num.post = length(x$Type[x$Type =='post']))
                  })
                  merge(dfw,dat)
                })

  # Method 2 -- suggested by @Arun
  dtMethod <- quote(
                dt[, list(pre=mean(Val[Type == "pre"]), 
                          post=mean(Val[Type == "post"]), 
                          Num.pre=length(Val[Type == "pre"]), 
                          Num.post=length(Val[Type == "post"]), 
                          ParD = paste(ParD, collapse="_")), 
                by=list(Par1, Par2)]
              ) 

 # Method 3 -- suggested by @regetz
 reduceMethod <- quote(
                  Reduce(merge, list(
                      dcast(df, formula = Par1+Par2~Type, value.var="Val",
                          fun.aggregate=mean),
                      setNames(dcast(df, formula = Par1+Par2~Type, value.var="Val",
                          fun.aggregate=length), c("Par1", "Par2", "Num.post",
                          "Num.pre")),
                      aggregate(df["ParD"], df[c("Par1", "Par2")], paste, collapse="_")
                      ))
                  )

 # Method 4 -- suggested by @Ramnath
 castddplyMethod <- quote(
                      reshape::cast(Par1 + Par2 + ParD ~ Type, 
                           data = ddply(df, .(Par1, Par2), transform, 
                           ParD = paste(ParD, collapse = "_")), 
                           fun  = c(mean, length)
                          )
                      )



# SAMPLE DATA #
#-------------#

library(data.table)
library(plyr)
library(reshape2)
library(rbenchmark)


  # for Par1, ParD
  LLL <- apply(expand.grid(LETTERS, LETTERS, LETTERS, stringsAsFactors=FALSE), 1, paste0, collapse="")
  lll <- apply(expand.grid(letters, letters, letters, stringsAsFactors=FALSE), 1, paste0, collapse="")

  # max size is 17568 with current sample data setup, ie: floor(length(LLL) / 18) * 18
  size <- 17568
  size <- 10800
  size <- 900  

  set.seed(1)
  df<-data.frame(Par1=rep(LLL[1:(size/2)], times=rep(c(2,2,3), size)[1:(size/2)])[1:(size)]
                 , Par2=rep(lll[1:(size/2)], times=rep(c(2,2,3), size)[1:(size/2)])[1:(size)]
                 , ParD=sample(unlist(lapply(c("f", "b"), paste0, lll)), size, FALSE)
                 , Type=rep(c("pre","post"), size/2)
                 , Val =sample(seq(10,100,10), size, TRUE)
                 )

  dt <- data.table(df, key=c("Par1", "Par2"))


# Confirming Same Results # 
#-------------------------#
  # Evaluate
  DF1 <- eval(plyrMethod)
  DF2 <- eval(dtMethod)

  # Convert to DF and sort columns and sort ParD levels, for use in identical
  colOrder <- sort(names(DF1))
  DF1 <- DF1[, colOrder]
  DF2 <- as.data.frame(DF2)[, colOrder]
  DF2$ParD <- factor(DF2$ParD, levels=levels(DF1$ParD))
  identical((DF1), (DF2))
  # [1] TRUE
#-------------------------#

RESULTS

#--------------------#
#     BENCHMARK      #
#--------------------#
benchmark(plyr=eval(plyrMethod), dt=eval(dtMethod), reduce=eval(reduceMethod), castddply=eval(castddplyMethod),
          replications=5, columns=c("relative", "test", "elapsed", "user.self", "sys.self", "replications"), 
          order="relative")


# SAMPLE SIZE = 900
  relative      test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
     1.000    reduce   0.392     0.375    0.018            5
     1.003        dt   0.393     0.377    0.016            5
     7.064      plyr   2.769     2.721    0.047            5
     8.003 castddply   3.137     3.030    0.106            5

# SAMPLE SIZE = 2,700
  relative   test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
     1.000     dt   1.371     1.327    0.090            5
     2.205 reduce   3.023     2.927    0.102            5
     7.291   plyr   9.996     9.644    0.377            5

# SAMPLE SIZE = 10,800
  relative      test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
     1.000        dt   8.678     7.168    1.507            5
     2.769    reduce  24.029    23.231    0.786            5
     6.946      plyr  60.277    52.298    7.947            5
    13.796 castddply 119.719   113.333   10.816            5

# SAMPLE SIZE = 17,568
  relative   test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
     1.000     dt  27.421    13.042   14.470            5
     4.030 reduce 110.498    75.853   34.922            5
     5.414   plyr 148.452   105.776   43.156            5

Update : Added results for baseMethod1

# Used only sample size of 90, as it was taking long
relative  test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
   1.000    dt   0.044     0.043    0.001            5
   7.773  plyr   0.342     0.339    0.003            5
  65.614 base1   2.887     2.866    0.028            5

Where
   baseMethod1 <- quote({
                  step1 <- with(df, split(df, list(Par1, Par2)))
                  step2 <- step1[sapply(step1, nrow) > 0]
                  step3 <- lapply(step2, function(x) {
                      piece1 <- tapply(x$Val, x$Type, mean)
                      piece2 <- tapply(x$Type, x$Type, length)
                      names(piece2) <- paste0("Num.", names(piece2))
                      out <- x[1, 1:2]
                      out[, 3:6] <- c(piece1, piece2)
                      names(out)[3:6] <-  names(c(piece1, piece2))
                      out$ParD <- paste(unique(x$ParD), collapse="_")
                      out
                  })
                  data.frame(do.call(rbind, step3), row.names=NULL)
                })

Update 2: Added keying the DT as part of the metric

Adding the indexing step to the benchmark for fairness as per @MatthewDowle s comment.
However, presumably, if data.table is used, it will be in place of the data.frame and hence the indexing will occur once and not simply for this procedure

   dtMethod.withkey <- quote({
                       dt <- data.table(df, key=c("Par1", "Par2"))       
                       dt[, list(pre=mean(Val[Type == "pre"]), 
                                 post=mean(Val[Type == "post"]), 
                                 Num.pre=length(Val[Type == "pre"]), 
                                 Num.post=length(Val[Type == "post"]), 
                                 ParD = paste(ParD, collapse="_")), 
                       by=list(Par1, Par2)]
                     }) 

# SAMPLE SIZE = 10,800
  relative       test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
     1.000         dt   9.155     7.055    2.137            5
     1.043 dt.withkey   9.553     7.245    2.353            5
     3.567     reduce  32.659    31.196    1.586            5
     6.703       plyr  61.364    54.080    7.600            5

Update 3: Benchmarking @MD's edits to @Arun's original answer

dtMethod.MD1 <- quote(
                  dt[, list(pre=mean(Val[.pre <- Type=="pre"]),     # save .pre
                            post=mean(Val[.post <- Type=="post"]),  # save .post
                            pre.num=sum(.pre),                      # reuse .pre
                            post.num=sum(.post),                    # reuse .post
                            ParD = paste(ParD, collapse="_")), 
                     by=list(Par1, Par2)]
                  )

dtMethod.MD2 <- quote(
                  dt[, { .pre <- Type=="pre"                  # or save .pre and .post up front 
                         .post <- Type=="post"
                         list(pre=mean(Val[.pre]), 
                              post=mean(Val[.post]),
                              pre.num=sum(.pre),
                              post.num=sum(.post), 
                              ParD = paste(ParD, collapse="_")) }
                  , by=list(Par1, Par2)]
                  )

dtMethod.MD3 <- quote(
                dt[, { .pre <- Type=="pre"
                       .post <- Type=="post"
                       list(pre=mean(Val[.pre]), 
                            post=mean(Val[.post]),
                            pre.num=sum(.pre),
                            post.num=sum(.post), 
                            ParD = list(ParD)) }     # list() faster than paste()
                , by=list(Par1, Par2)]
                )

benchmark(dt.M1=eval(dtMethod.MD1), dt.M2=eval(dtMethod.MD2), dt.M3=eval(dtMethod.MD3), dt=eval(dtMethod),
      replications=5, columns=c("relative", "test", "elapsed", "user.self", "sys.self", "replications"), 
      order="relative")

#--------------------#

Comparing the different data.table methods amongst themselves


# SAMPLE SIZE = 900
  relative  test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
     1.000 dt.M3   0.198     0.197    0.001            5  <~~~ "list()" Method
     1.242 dt.M1   0.246     0.243    0.004            5
     1.253 dt.M2   0.248     0.242    0.007            5
     1.884    dt   0.373     0.367    0.007            5

# SAMPLE SIZE = 17,568
  relative  test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
     1.000 dt.M3  33.492    24.487    9.122            5   <~~~ "list()" Method
     1.086 dt.M1  36.388    11.442   25.086            5
     1.086 dt.M2  36.388    10.845   25.660            5
     1.126    dt  37.701    13.256   24.535            5

Comparing MD3 ("list" method) with MD1 (best of DT non-list methods)
Using a clean session  (ie, removing string cache)
_Note: Ran the following twice, fresh session each time, with practically identical results
       Then re-ran in the *same* session, with reps=5. Results very different._


benchmark(dt.M1=eval(dtMethod.MD1), dt.M3=eval(dtMethod.MD3), replications=1, columns=c("relative", "test", "elapsed", "user.self", "sys.self", "replications"), order="relative")
# SAMPLE SIZE=17,568;  CLEAN SESSION
  relative  test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
     1.000 dt.M1   8.885     4.260    4.617            1
     1.633 dt.M3  14.506    12.821    1.677            1

# SAMPLE SIZE=17,568;  *SAME* SESSION
  relative  test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
     1.000 dt.M1  33.443    10.200   23.226            5
     1.048 dt.M3  35.060    26.127    8.915            5

#--------------------#

New benchmarks against previous methods
_Note: Not using the "list method" as results are not the same as other methods_

# SAMPLE SIZE = 900
  relative   test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
     1.000  dt.M1   0.254     0.247    0.008            5
     1.705 reduce   0.433     0.425    0.010            5
    11.280   plyr   2.865     2.842    0.031            5

# SAMPLE SIZE = 17,568
  relative   test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
     1.000  dt.M1  24.826    10.427   14.458            5
     4.348 reduce 107.935    70.107   38.314            5
     5.942   plyr 147.508   106.958   41.083            5
share|improve this answer
4  
Thanks @AnandaMahto, but it's not posted for votes, simply for relevant information. This should be a comment, but alas it is rather long ;) –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 3 '13 at 16:11
1  
As I mentioned, this is interesting, and it certainly can be useful for the OP and others who stop by. Community Wiki is dead or dying, but this might have been an appropriate opportunity for using it. –  Ananda Mahto Mar 3 '13 at 16:16
1  
@Ricardo Yeah I'm pretty sure someone with more time and skills could use base to beat plyr. –  Tyler Rinker Mar 3 '13 at 18:31
1  
(+1) @RicardoSaporta, I find this post makes the answers complete, in a way. –  Arun Mar 3 '13 at 18:52
1  
Great. Interested to see what difference the list vs paste makes (see my last edit to Arun's answer). That can be tricky to test, though, as it depends on whether the R session has seen those new strings before or not. Adding strings to R's global string cache takes some time which is skipped if the string is already there (which is one reason a rerun can be faster than a fresh R session). –  Matt Dowle Mar 3 '13 at 22:00

One Step solution combining reshape::cast with plyr::ddply

cast(Par1 + Par2 + ParD ~ Type, data = ddply(df, .(Par1, Par2), transform, 
  ParD = paste(ParD, collapse = "_")), fun  = c(mean, length))

NOTE that the dcast function in reshape2 does not allow multiple aggregate functions to be passed, while the cast function in reshape does.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, @Ramnath! While I would still consider it as 2-steps (one for ddply and second for cast), it is the cleanest-looking solution among all proposed. Although it somehow disproves the opinion that reshape2 is by all means better than no-more-developing reshape... –  Vasily A Mar 4 '13 at 0:31
1  
as per OP's request, I've added benchmarks. cast+ddply beats out all other methods proposed except data.table –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 4 '13 at 0:39
    
@RicardoSaporta Thanks. But, the code I see for cast+ddply is a repetition of the reduce method. You may want to fix that. –  Ramnath Mar 4 '13 at 0:44
    
@Ramnath, you are correct and my previous comment is incorrect. I've fixed the mistake above. (benchmarks are listed under N=10,800) –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 4 '13 at 1:15
    
Those numbers make more sense. reshape is known to be slow, so I am not surprised. –  Ramnath Mar 4 '13 at 1:51

I believe this base R solution is comparable with @Arun's data table solution. (Which isn't to say I would prefer it; that code is much simpler!)

baseMethod2 <- quote({
    is <- unname(split(1:nrow(df), with(df, paste(Par1, Par2, sep="\b"))))
    i1 <- sapply(is, `[`, 1)
    out <- with(df, data.frame(Par1=Par1[i1], Par2=Par2[i1]))
    js <- lapply(is, function(i) split(i, df$Type[i]))
    out$post <- sapply(js, function(j) mean(df$Val[j$post]))
    out$pre <- sapply(js, function(j) mean(df$Val[j$pre]))
    out$Num.pre <- sapply(js, function(j) length(j$pre))
    out$Num.post <- sapply(js, function(j) length(j$post))
    out$ParD <- sapply(is, function(x) paste(df$ParD[x], collapse="_"))
    out
})

Using @RicardoSaporta's timing code with 900, 2700, and 10,800, respectively:

> relative        test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
3    1.000 baseMethod2   0.230     0.229        0            5
1    1.130          dt   0.260     0.257        0            5
2    8.752        plyr   2.013     2.006        0            5

> relative        test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
3    1.000 baseMethod2   0.877     0.872        0            5
1    1.068          dt   0.937     0.934        0            5
2    8.060        plyr   7.069     7.043        0            5

> relative        test elapsed user.self sys.self replications
1    1.000          dt   6.232     6.178    0.031            5
3    1.085 baseMethod2   6.763     6.683    0.054            5
2    7.263        plyr  45.261    44.983    0.104            5
share|improve this answer

Trying to wrap different aggregation expressions into a self-contained function (expressions should yield atomic values)...

multi.by <- function(X, INDEX,...) {
    expressions <- substitute(...())
    duplicates <- duplicated(INDEX)
    res <- do.call(rbind,sapply(split(X,cumsum(!duplicates),drop=T), function(part) 
        sapply(expressions,eval,part,simplify=F),simplify=F))
    if (is.data.frame(INDEX)) res <- cbind(INDEX[!duplicates,],res)
    else rownames(res) <- INDEX[!duplicates]
    res
}

multi.by(df,df[,1:2],
    pre=mean(Val[Type=="pre"]), 
    post=mean(Val[Type=="post"]),
    Num.pre=sum(Type=="pre"),
    Num.post=sum(Type=="post"),
    ParD=paste(ParD, collapse="_"))
share|improve this answer

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