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I just started learning c++. I came across scope resolution operator and I tried a program something like this

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int i = 40;
int main(){
    int i = 20;
    {  
        int i = 10;
        cout<< ::i;  // prints 40
        cout<<i;    // prints 10
        cout << i;  // how do i print variable i whose value is 20 
    }
}

But if i want to access the variable i ( i=20) inside the inner block of main(). How do i do that? is it possible? This may be stupid but I am not aware of all the built in functions of c++. So wanted to find out if theres any way to do it. Thanks

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marked as duplicate by jrok, chris, billz, ks1322, sth Mar 3 '13 at 8:17

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
I don't imagine this is possible. –  chris Mar 3 '13 at 7:16
2  
I imagine this is impossible. –  jrok Mar 3 '13 at 7:18
    
There are very few cases when you want to shadow a variable like this. In those few cases, there are absolutely zero when you also want to refer to the outer variable. So that's why this isn't possible. –  Pubby Mar 3 '13 at 7:19
    
Why write code that on a first glance is ambiguous? Just use sensible names for variables and avoid possible confusion in the future. –  Ed Heal Mar 3 '13 at 7:20
    
Possible or not, but very interesting. –  axiom Mar 3 '13 at 7:26

1 Answer 1

I think this can be done using namespaces.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
namespace inner{int i;}
int i = 40;
int main() {
    inner::i = 20;
    {
        int i = 10;
        cout<< ::i;  // prints 40
        cout<<i;    // prints 10
        cout << inner::i; // this prints 20
    }
}

I hope this can be used for several i's in a code.

EDIT The answer changes the program semantically as it makes inner i a global variable.

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2  
this changes the semantics of the program, though, inner::i is now global where it was local before. –  Stephen Lin Mar 3 '13 at 8:16
    
should i consider to remove the answer? @StephenLin –  Sumit Gera Mar 3 '13 at 9:06
    
probably, all it can do it confuse –  Stephen Lin Mar 3 '13 at 9:15

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